Global bosses predict U-shaped coronavirus recovery

first_img Global bosses predict U-shaped coronavirus recovery Harry Robertson Global business leaders have predicted economies will fail to post a quick recovery bounce back quickly from the coronavirus crash. Many CEOs worry their firms could cease trading altogether, according to a new survey. The International Monetary Fund, for example, has said global GDP will drop by three per cent this year in the worst crash since the 1930s. Bosses say the coronavirus lockdown is likely to cause longer-term damage to the economy than initially expected (Getty Images) whatsapp Bosses say the coronavirus lockdown is likely to cause longer-term damage to the economy than initially expected (Getty Images) Also Read: Global bosses predict U-shaped coronavirus recovery Share The report comes against a backdrop of market optimism, however. US and European stocks have in many cases risen more than 20 per cent since the initial coronavirus crash in February and March. The YPO poll found that 22 per cent of company bosses predict a double-dip recovery. The business leadership surveyed 3,534 chief executives from 109 countries between 15 and 19 April. Around a quarter expect their workforce to be down by more than 20 per cent a year from now. International organisations, governments and the private sector have made increasingly dire predictions about the damage coronavirus will wreak on the global economy. Slightly more than 10 per cent of bosses said they thought coronavirus could well spell the end for their company. Meanwhile, 40 per cent said the outbreak was a severe threat. Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBleacherBreaker4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!BleacherBreakerUndoMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryUndobonvoyaged.comTotal Jerks: These Stars Are Horrible People.bonvoyaged.comUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyUndozenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comUndoNational Penny For Seniors7 Discounts Seniors Only Get If They AskNational Penny For SeniorsUndoGloriousaDrone Captures What No One Was Supposed to SeeGloriousaUndoNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyUndoDefinitionThe Funniest Yard Signs EVER WrittenDefinitionUndo Bosses say the coronavirus lockdown is likely to cause longer-term damage to the economy than initially expected (Getty Images) Also Read: Global bosses predict U-shaped coronavirus recovery However, groups have been divided about whether economies will see a quick ‘V-shaped’ recovery or a more prolonged recession in a ‘U-shaped’ recovery. Others have worried the recovery will be ‘W-shaped’ with a so-called double-dip recession. Investors have taken heart in unprecedented central bank support. Signs that the spread of coronavirus is slowing and steps towards reopening economies have also lifted spirits. “We have not seen a crisis like this for over a hundred years, and some household names will not survive,” said Glenn Keys, YPO member and chairman of Sydney-based health firm Aspen Medical. Wednesday 22 April 2020 10:37 am whatsapp Roughly 60 per cent of bosses surveyed by business network YPO said they expect a ‘U-shaped’ coronavirus recovery that features a relatively long period of subdued activity. Yet the YPO poll suggested that markets may be getting ahead of themselves. Roughly two-thirds of business leaders said the negative impact of coronavirus on earnings will continue for more than a year.  Bosses say the coronavirus lockdown is likely to cause longer-term damage to the economy than initially expected (Getty Images) Also Read: Global bosses predict U-shaped coronavirus recovery Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners Biden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comlast_img read more

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Bank earnings preview: What to expect in this week’s quarterly results

first_imgProvisions for the fourth quarter increased by £128m, taking the total set aside for the year to £4.2bn.  Consumer spending will start returning to normal levels in the coming months, while trading figures also stabilise, but the issue of low interest rates are unlikely to subside yet.  It has been a year of cost cutting – £277m in total – while announcing its exit from the Republic of Ireland, while the Northern Irish division of Ulster Bank will remain in the group. Hewson notes that while there has been interest in the loan book but is struggling to give away the rest of the business.  The sector set aside billions in provisions for bad loans at the start of the pandemic, expecting a huge increase in defaults. However with thanks to government support bad loans have been lower than expected.  Standard Chartered’s pre-tax profit dropped 57 per cent last year to $.6bn, largely caused by higher credit impairments. It booked impairments of $2.3bn, more than double the previous year.  (Getty Images) Also Read: Bank earnings preview: What to expect in this week’s quarterly results Barclays has had a stronger year than most largely due to the performance of its investment bank. If the US banks are anything to go by this trend will continue into the first quarter for the bank.  Standard Chartered – 29th April “That gives it a lot of options, including dividends, acquisitions and buybacks. THe bank has so far said it intends to pay a “progressive dividend” but from what level is unclear,” he added. Antonio Horta-Osorio bid farewell on a high at the end of the fourth quarter. Lloyds’ figures were encouraging despite concerns lockdowns could affect its non-performing loan provisions. It did however resume its dividend for the first time since October 2019 after regulators put a temporary moratorium on payouts during the pandemic.  (Getty Images) Also Read: Bank earnings preview: What to expect in this week’s quarterly results (Getty Images) Also Read: Bank earnings preview: What to expect in this week’s quarterly results “With the dividend also getting reinstated and the outlook for this year becoming more positive, we could start to see some of the provisions that were set aside last year being added back if the economy proves to be more resilient than initially projected,” MIchael Hewson, chief markets analyst at CMC Markets said.  HSBC – 27th April  (Getty Images) HSBC is heavily dependent on its core banking business and it is likely weakness in this division will continue to hurt its top line in the first quarter, even as its sales and growth trading grow.  (Getty Images) Also Read: Bank earnings preview: What to expect in this week’s quarterly results whatsapp Nicholas Hyett, equity analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown points to the substantial cash pile Lloyds has built in the past year after it was forced to suspend dividends.  It has been quite the year for Natwest boss Alison Rose who has overseen a makeover of the bank amid the pandemic. Last year Natwest’s share price hit new lows but has since rebounded to a post pandemic high.  We’re already starting to see some of the provisions set aside by US banks last year being added back, although UK banks may be more hesitant.  whatsapp While the banking sector has recovered somewhat in the past two months this week the issue of bad loans and customer defaults will be front of mind.  The bank set aside £3.24bn in impairments for 2020, which was below expectations.  Barclays – 30th April  Jefferies analysts predict a two per cent growth in retail-related revenue, a 29 per cent rise quarter-on-quarter in financial markets and a 33 per cent jump in wealth management revenue.  Natwest – 29th April  Monday 26 April 2021 6:00 am Analysts are also speculating that StanChart could snap up Citi’s retail banking operations in 13 Asian and EMEA markets. Earlier this month Citi said it planned to exit operations in China, Malaysia and India among others, which they estimate around $50bn of loans associated with them.  Its pre-tax profits fell from £4.4bn to £3.1bn, while investment bank profits rose to £4bn.  “We calculate STAN will have around $2.4bn of excess capital at end-2021 and any use of this towards the addition of consumer books in key ASEAN markets should be taken positively,” they said. Lloyds – 28th April  HSBC is likely to outperform consensus estimates earnings, continuing the trend of the last two quarters. However revenues are likely to miss expectations – revenues for the full year 2020 were 10 per cent lower than the previous year driven by lower core banking revenues.  Share Bank earnings preview: What to expect in this week’s quarterly results Angharad Carrick Barclays reinstated its dividend with a 1 pence payout as well as a £700m share buyback in its last set of results, despite setting aside over £4.8bn in non-performing loans.  “With US banks rotating capital out of their loan loss provisions, we could well see banks in the UK do something similar, while barring a setback, in the form of a new variant or another lockdown the outlook looks much brighter now than it did at the beginning of the year,” Hewson said. Show Comments ▼last_img read more

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Swiss family sails around the world for climate change

first_imgClimate Change | Environment | Oceans | OutdoorsSwiss family sails around the world for climate changeAugust 3, 2016 by Davis Hovey, KNOM-Nome Share:The Schwoerer family is sailing around the world educating people about climate change for ToptoTop Organization. Photo (Photo courtesy of TopToTop)The Pachamama Band, also known to a few as the Schwoerer family singers, are all members of one Swiss family that has been living at sea for the past sixteen years. They’ve been sailing around the world in a boat called Pachamama, educating people about climate change and re-strengthening humanity’s relationship with nature.“It’s about respect to nature, about giving back also to others, just to care about this planet like it’s your own mother,” Dario Schwoerer said.As part of an organization the Schwoerer family started called ToptoTop, their goal was to reach the tops of the seven tallest mountains on each of the seven continents without using motorized transportation of any kind. ToptoTop also took on volunteers when possible to help crew the boat, collect data on climate change, and assist with the kids’ education. Currently, there are three volunteers living on board with the Schwoerers.Dario Schwoerer, the father of five, said the plan was to take four years to complete this record feat, but the plan has changed slightly since he and his wife first started in the year 2000.“So, our goal now is to go through the Northwest Passage to Greenland, and do, more or less, a figure eight… and on that figure eight, we will also sail south to Antarctica and hopefully do the mountain we tried to do in 2004 then,” Schwoerer said.In 2004, Dario and his family attempted to reach Mt. Vinson, the tallest mountain in Antarctica, but their self-built vessel was so damaged by the icy waters that they couldn’t continue. The Schwoerers have faced a variety of challenges during their sixteen-year long sea voyage, including a lack of funding.One of the sponsors for ToptoTop for eight years was SGS, an international inspection and certification company. But when a new CEO took over SGS, Dario said their educational project’s resources suffered; “now, we are running on half of our budget,” he said.Currently, the rest of ToptoTop’s budget comes from individual donations and from their other sponsor, Victorinox. Victorinox manufactures apparel and travel gear, but they are more commonly known for making genuine Swiss Army knives. Being of Swiss heritage, The Schwoerer family brought many Swiss Army knives with them to serve different practical purposes on board — and, maybe, a not-so-practical one.Sabine Schwoerer, a former nurse and now full time mother, used a Swiss Army knife during each of her children’s births. “We cut the umbilical cords… so we have five knives, and we will give them to them (the children) when they are 20,” she said with a laugh.Five knives for five children: the oldest is Salina, then Andri, Noe, Allegra, and the newborn, Mia, who can be heard crying in the background. All of them were born at sea and have spent their entire lives on this floating home.So when the children were asked how they felt about frequently moving from place to place, they said, “It’s good, it’s nice, you have to say ‘bye’ to a lot, that’s sad, but you get to say ‘hi’ to a lot, too.”And the Schwoerer family has said “hi” to a lot, from Mt. Everest, to the Shanghai World Expo facilities, and small villages around the world where they have taught more than 80,000 children about climate change.After seeing so many beautiful places, Dario still recalled one of his favorite sights, an ice ridge from the Piz Bernina Mountain in his homeland.“There’s a wonderful ice ridge going to the top, it’s like a stairway to heaven out of ice, it’s really beautiful,” said Dario with a twinkle in his eyes.Originally a Swiss mountain guide, Dario grew up in a remote village of 55 people located in a part of the Swiss mountains. When he saw climate change negatively affecting his workplace, Dario studied at a Swiss university to become a climatologist and made a plan to educate others about climate change.That’s why Dario is encouraging and educating children all over the world, including his own.Dario recalled, “nature teaches them something, every day, and I mean just the other day when we sailed in here and saw the Salmon Creek here. They catched (sic) more than 11 fish, and they have had a blast. Andri the 9-year-old taking them in, Noe the 6-year-old killing them, and Allegra the 5-year-old and Selena the 11-year-old cleaning them out. They came back at 10 o’clock at night, we didn’t know where they went, big smiles with all that salmon.”The ToptoTop organization’s desire, and Dario’s wish, is that after this Pole-to-Pole expedition, then a younger generation will continue this for the Schwoerers.Dario said the hope is, “that young people take over. ThatPachamama, that’s the name of the boat that stands for Mother Earth, goes around the planet many, many times more, inspiring young people, and that hopefully we get settled once then.”Having visited cities and towns all over the world, the Schwoerers are unsure as to where they would like to make port permanently, but they say Alaska is towards the TOP of their list. For now, the family will stay in Nome for approximately a week and then sail to Barrow to determine if they can continue up the Northwest Passage.Share this story:last_img read more

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Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta to get new domestic violence shelter in Hooper Bay

first_imgHealth | Sexual Abuse & Domestic Violence | SouthwestYukon-Kuskokwim Delta to get new domestic violence shelter in Hooper BayNovember 15, 2019 by Emily Hofstaedter, KNOM – Nome Share:This slough is the access point to the ocean for many people of Hooper Bay. (Creative Commons photo by Travis)The community of Hooper Bay has never had a domestic violence shelter before, but that is expected to change in January 2020, when shelter staff said they hope to be operating a new 24/7 shelter to serve women and their children.Emma Smith, the victims’ services coordinator for the Hooper Bay Victims Services Project, grew up in Hooper Bay. She said the shelter will also serve the surrounding region: including Chevak and Scammon Bay.The project is a partnership between the Rural Alaska Community Action Program, RurAL CAP, and the Native Village of Hooper Bay. That partnership between a nonprofit and tribe allows them to use nearly $500,000  of funds set aside for tribal entities from the Office for Victims of Crimes. This is a small portion of the $42 million in federal grant funding for rural public safety announced by U.S. Attorney General William Barr last month.RurAL CAP Chief Executive Officer Patrick Anderson said plans for the shelter have been in the works for about a year, after Hooper Bay listed a domestic violence shelter as their biggest tribal justice need. He expects the shelter to house 12 women and their children.“The children suffer substantially when they witness domestic violence in the home and usually there are other adverse experiences that they’ve had already so our goal is to figure out how we can provide full wrap-around services and bring the family back to a non-violent state,” Anderson said.Some of those services include hiring people skilled in trauma-informed care and victim advocates. Ideally, the shelter would be able to give financial advice too, as separation from an abuser can also result in a loss of income. While exact job descriptions are still being drafted, Anderson said RurAL CAP is looking to hire up to 10 people to work at the shelter.“We expect some to have experience or be trained in how a shelter operates and make sure that only the appropriate people are there and that the safety and security of the residents are assured,” he said.Construction began in September, renovating a three-bedroom apartment donated by the Sea Lion Corporation. Cathie Clements with RurAL CAP said the shelter is part of the Sea Lion Corporation building and will have two four-person bedrooms, one three-person room and a common area.In Hooper Bay, Smith is planning out culturally relevant programming to help future shelter residents heal.For example, she’s looking for elders willing to share knowledge on grass-weaving or sewing. Smith envisions them going out on the tundra for food-gathering or just fresh-air.“They say the tundra is healing, spiritually healing for someone that is turmoiling inside,” she said.Many details are still being worked out, Smith said, but hopefully the shelter will accommodate long-term and short-term guests. Specialists and advocates will work out of the shelter, transferring survivors to the Emmonak Women’s shelter or elsewhere if necessary.For now, Smith is focused on getting the word out to Hooper Bay and surrounding communities about the new domestic violence shelter coming to the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.If you are experiencing domestic violence, or the threat of domestic violence, you can reach out to the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.Share this story:last_img read more

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New annuity option has potential, but harbours risks, DBRS says

first_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitter James Langton A proposed new annuity model could fill a gap in the retirement product market, but it also poses risks, says DBRS Ltd. in a new report.The Toronto-based rating agency said that a new annuity product that was proposed in the latest federal budget, known as the advanced life deferred annuity (ALDA), could help guard against the risk of retirees outliving their savings. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords AnnuitiesCompanies DBRS TFSAs already a winner, but tweaks could make them even better: C.D. Howe Survey finds women aren’t relying on partners to support them in retirement The proposed ALDA would enable investors to buy an annuity for a lump sum at age 65, with payments beginning at age 85, and continuing for the rest of their life.“The lengthier deferral period in an ALDA is important, as it enables the guaranteed income payments to be much larger than if the payments started right away,” DBRS said, adding, “Purchasing an ALDA reduces the likelihood of an individual outliving their retirement savings or not having adequate income in their later years when expenses generally rise as a result of increasing assisted living needs, health care needs and inflation.”Yet, DBRS also warned that there are potential downsides to the product that must be factored in when evaluating it.These risks include inflation, a lack of liquidity in the product, giving up control over investments, diminishing assets to pass along and the risk of dying before the payments kick in.Ultimately, DBRS says that ALDAs will likely appeal to a relatively small portion of the overall population — such as retirees who can expect to live well into their 90s, and have enough savings to enable them to wait for years until the annuity payments kick in.“Nonetheless, the concept of the ALDA is an encouraging step towards ensuring enough retirement income for Canada’s growing population of retirees age 85+,” DBRS concluded. Otar: GMWBs help increase odds to meet retirement goals Related news Senior people walking on the beach goodluz/123RFlast_img read more

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Government Finalises Plans for Funeral Arrangements for Victims of Portland Tragedy

first_imgRelatedGovernment Finalises Plans for Funeral Arrangements for Victims of Portland Tragedy Government Finalises Plans for Funeral Arrangements for Victims of Portland Tragedy UncategorizedJanuary 13, 2009 RelatedGovernment Finalises Plans for Funeral Arrangements for Victims of Portland Tragedy Advertisementscenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Government has finalized plans for the funeral services of the 14 persons who lost their lives in the December 19, Rio Grande Valley tragedy in Portland.Minister of State for Project Implementation in the Office of the Prime Minister, Daryl Vaz, says autopsies have been completed for all 14 victims and the funeral dates have been finalized. (See attached document)He said funeral services for the 14 will take place between January 15-25, with one service scheduled for January 15, another one for January 17, while five of the victims will be buried on January 18, and the remaining seven will be buried on January 25.Prime Minister Bruce Golding will be among the government representatives attending the January 25th funeral service for the seven community members of Mill Bank, the community which suffered the greatest loss in the tragedy.Mr. Vaz said representatives of the government and related agencies will also be meeting with the Portland Parish Council next week Wednesday (January 14) to discuss on-going assistance for the surviving children of the 14 persons who lost their lives in the December 19 Portland tragedy.Mr. Vaz says that meeting will be attended by representatives of the Child Development Agency, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, along with the Parish Council. The meeting will be hearing recommendations from the various agencies as to how best to provide for the children who lost their parents in the accident.Mr. Vaz noted that to date government has fulfilled all its commitment to the families of the tragedy by underwriting the costs of the funerals and providing a cash grant of $25,000 to each of the families to go towards the costs of other preparations.‘We are also taking care of those who received injuries in the accident by providing a further allocation of a $20,000 cash grant to each of the injured, Mr. Vaz disclosed. He noted that this allocation was being granted to underwrite the costs of prescription drugs and other financial needs.Mr. Vaz expressed government’s gratitude for the continued support it has been receiving from donors and private sector companies, to the Portland tragedy fund set up with NCB. The contributions to the fund now stand at $3.3-million and the Minister is appealing to the public to continue to make their contributions to the fund. Donations can be sent to the NCB Current Account # 351 077 328. RelatedGovernment Finalises Plans for Funeral Arrangements for Victims of Portland Tragedylast_img read more

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Chancellor DiStefano highlights value of modernizing CU Boulder’s historic buildings before state committee

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Dec. 18, 2019 Chancellor Phillip DiStefano advocated for the modernization of CU Boulder’s historic buildings on Wednesday, Dec. 18, before the state legislature’s Capital Development Committee, highlighting the impactful role state funding could play in ensuring these spaces remain hubs of student success and research excellence for decades to come. DiStefano zeroed in specifically on two buildings—Hellems Arts & Sciences and Guggenheim Geography. Both have broad impact and have long been viewed as great opportunities to partner with the state on major renovations similar to the modernization of the Ketchum Arts & Sciences building earlier this decade. And both have recently moved to the top of the CU System’s prioritization list, with Hellems now listed as the system’s top priority for receipt of state funds and Guggenheim listed fourth.The state has very limited funds available to support maintenance and construction each year. While campus has funded recent new construction with a combination of campus cash, philanthropy and other innovative partnerships, CU Boulder has focused its requests for state funding on major renovations as a way to maximize the value of such investments by the state.“The focus of our state request, which is the same as last year, is to take care of the buildings we have,” DiStefano said. “As we maintain our historic buildings, we must also modernize the spaces to meet current education and sustainability standards.”DiStefano’s presentation comes at a particularly important point in the state’s Fiscal Year 2020-21 budgeting process. Gov. Jared Polis’s initial budget request earlier this year did not include funding for the Hellems or Guggenheim projects. The Capital Development Committee (CDC), however, is a statutory committee composed of a mix of state senators and representatives that plays an important role in the budgeting process. The CDC reviews funding requests for capital construction projects from all state agencies, and makes prioritized recommendations to the Joint Budget Committee. Construction requests seeking state funds are ranked by the CDC each year to help determine which receive funding from the legislature when the budget bill comes out each spring. DiStefano’s presentation Wednesday highlighted the value CU Boulder is providing to the state in addressing access and affordability to students, positively impacting the economy and taking a leading role in sustainability. Highlights included:CU Boulder’s Fall 2019 freshman class was the university’s most diverse in school history.Improved graduation rates.A concerted effort to increase investment in Colorado resident students, who now graduate with $1,100 less in student debt than the Colorado average.The Boulder campus generates $3.85 billion annually to the state’s economy.The university’s legacy of sustainability is being carried forward in construction and renovations, with 11 buildings on campus now certified LEED Platinum.DiStefano pointed out that modernizing CU Boulder’s historic buildings will be crucial to the continued success of such efforts. The deferred maintenance backlog for campus general fund buildings has reached $558 million. The state has contributed $22 million toward that backlog over the past five years, while CU Boulder has contributed $77 million toward these efforts during that period.The chancellor laid out an approach by which the campus is increasing utilization of the buildings already on campus to minimize the amount of new construction that is needed. As the campus addresses deferred maintenance to major systems in aging buildings, such projects are coupled with renovations that modernize and enhance teaching and research environments for 21st-century learners.For Hellems, the university is proposing a four-phased project totalling $83.5 million. The project would include $33.4 million in crucial facilities improvements from the state and $50.1 million in academic space improvements funded by the university. For Guggenheim, CU Boulder is proposing a $27.7 million project that includes an $11.1 million request for state funds, with $16.6 million committed by the university.The university will know which projects receive state funding by late spring.Categories:Deadlines & AnnouncementsCampus Communitylast_img read more

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Amavi Cellars and Pepper Bridge Winery Hire New National Sales Manager

first_imgEmail Home Industry News Releases Amavi Cellars and Pepper Bridge Winery Hire New National Sales ManagerIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessAmavi Cellars and Pepper Bridge Winery Hire New National Sales ManagerBy Press Release – April 21, 2016 39 0 Share AdvertisementMark Melia, Industry Veteran to Lead Pioneering Walla Walla BrandsApril 21, 2016 (Walla Walla, WA) – Mark Melia joined Amavi Cellars and Pepper Bridge Winery as the National Sales Manager this month. He oversees distributor sales for the two Walla Walla estate wineries. Melia’s experience in distribution, on and off-premise sales, wineries and his overall passion for the wine business brought him to the pioneering Walla Walla group.Growing up in Massachusetts in a wine drinking family gave Melia early exposure to many European wines and sparked an interest that led him to his career. From working in a small wine shop on Martha’s Vineyard over twenty years ago to running the wine program at the AAA Five Diamond rated Boulders Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona, Melia has an extensive background in both on and off-premise sales. Years working on the East Coast with distributors both small and large round out his experience.An opportunity to run US sales for renowned Willamette Valley winery Penner-Ash Wine Cellars brought him to the Northwest. Melia subsequently worked with Scott Paul Wines as National Sales Manager before joining Amavi Cellars and Pepper Bridge Winery.“Mark’s sales experience in a variety of wholesale channels is key for the growth of Amavi Cellars and Pepper Bridge Winery,” said Eric McKibben, General Manager and Partner. “Understanding the nature of boutique brands make him a great fit for our business.”About Amavi CellarsAmavi Cellars symbolizes love (amor) and life (vita) through its wines, which are 100% estate, 100% sustainable, and 100% Walla Walla Valley. Winemaker Jean-François Pellet brings the Walla Walla Valley AVA to life with his handcrafted, terroir-driven wines. Amavi Cellars is owned and operated by three families: the McKibbens, the Goffs and the Pellets, who not only are dedicated stewards of the land, but also are committed to producing premium quality wines that appeal to the palates and sense of aesthetics of today’s wine drinkers. www.amavicellars.comAbout Pepper Bridge WineryPepper Bridge Winery represents the pioneering spirit of the Walla Walla Valley. Owned and operated by three families – the McKibbens, the Goffs and the Pellets, the winery is a leader in quality winemaking, innovative technology and vineyard development. Pepper Bridge Winery produces Bordeaux-style wines using traditional winemaking techniques, French oak and estate fruit from the Walla Walla Valley. Combining old-world philosophy with modern innovation, the winery has become an industry leader. www.pepperbridge.comAdvertisement Facebook ReddIt TAGSAmavi CellarsMark MeliapeoplePepper Bridge Winery Previous articleVintners Build on Success of Inaugural Sonoma County Barrel AuctionNext articleAfternoon Brief, April 21 Press Release Twitter Linkedin Pinterestlast_img read more

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International Teen Film Festival returns to Santa Monica

first_img[email protected] :BFA Film & Digital ContentClaire DenisGuillermo Del ToroMelissa HuenSteven SpielbergThe Santa Monica International Teen Film FestivalThe Santa Monica Next Gen Awardshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentLaughing Matters – The Butcher of Brentwood and the Stable GeniusLA County motel rooms could be turned into homeless housingYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall8 hours agoEntertainmentLifeNoteworthyTales of Two DaughtersCharles Andrews14 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson19 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter19 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor19 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press19 hours ago HomeLifeEntertainmentArtsInternational Teen Film Festival returns to Santa Monica Jun. 21, 2019 at 6:00 amArtsEntertainmentEventsFeaturedNewsInternational Teen Film Festival returns to Santa MonicaAngel Carreras2 years agoBFA Film & Digital ContentClaire DenisGuillermo Del ToroMelissa HuenSteven SpielbergThe Santa Monica International Teen Film FestivalThe Santa Monica Next Gen Award A film directing wunderkind akin to Steven Spielberg, Guillermo Del Toro or Claire Denis could be discovered at an upcoming film festival this weekend. The Santa Monica International Teen Film Festival returns for its 14th iteration this weekend.  The festival showcases 60 second to 15 minute film submissions from teens around the globe, ages 13-18. Prizes for filmmakers will include gift certificates, trophies and, for best overall film, a $40,000 tuition scholarship to the BFA Film & Digital Content program at the Studio School, a four-year entertainment college in Downtown Los Angeles.While the film festival is international, Santa Monica teens will also have a chance to take home some recognition as well. The Santa Monica Next Gen Award, an award for budding Scorseses that live, work, or go to school in Santa Monica, will be awarded to Santa Monica’s best filmmaker.  Past winners of the festival have included filmmakers from Germany, Florida, Singapore and of course, right here in Santa Monica. “It’s a great community event,” said Melissa Huen, director of marketing at Studio Enterprise.  “It’s a wonderful opportunity to see how the world tells stories, to see what young people can do and what they have to say about their own unique perspectives.”Huen says the film festival received roughly 400 entries from 33 different countries, with most entries coming from the U.S., Canada, India and Australia. Of the festival’s categories ⁠— live action, experimental/music video, documentary, animation, sustainability, public service announcements ⁠— Huen says live action and animation reigned supreme in submissions. “With today’s technology, anyone can make a movie and put a film out there,” Huen said. “When you can see what these kids can do, what they can get across in their films, you’ll be surprised.”After sifting through every last one of those 400 entries, Huen says moviegoers should give the Santa Monica International Teen a shot over whatever’s at the multiplex this weekend for one reason ⁠— tomorrow’s movie makers are making thoughtful movies today.“The films, it seems like a lot of the students had things to say, they all had messages. It wasn’t just the fact that they had incredible stories to tell. They were moved by getting a message out there.”The Santa Monica International Film Festival takes place Saturday, June 22nd and Sunday, June 23rd at the Miles Memorial Playhouse, 1130 Lincoln Boulevard. For more information, visit https://www.smgov.net/teenfilmfest.aspxlast_img read more

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Exxon Claims Spill Damage Limited, Gov. Doubtful

first_imgLAUREL – An oil pipeline that spewed tens of thousands of gallons of crude oil into Montana’s Yellowstone River was temporarily shut down in May because of concerns over rising waters, and regulators last year warned Exxon Mobil of several safety violations along the line.Exxon officials estimated that up to 1,000 barrels, or 42,000 gallons, spilled late Friday night before the flow from the damaged pipeline was stopped. The break near Laurel has fouled miles of riverbank and forced municipalities and irrigation districts to close intakes across eastern Montana.The 12-inch pipeline was shut down in May because of concerns over the rising waters, Exxon Mobil Pipeline Co. president Gary Pruessing said Sunday.The company decided to restart the line after examining its safety record and deciding the risk was low, he said.The cause of the spill has not yet been determined, but company and government officials have speculated that high waters in recent weeks may have scoured the river bottom and exposed the pipeline to debris that could have damaged the pipe. Eastern Montana received record rainfall in the last month and also has a huge snowpack in the mountains that is melting, which has resulted in widespread flooding.“We are very curious about what may have happened at the bottom of the river. We don’t have that yet,” Pruessing saidThe U.S. Department of Transportation, which oversees pipelines, last year issued a warning letter to Exxon Mobil that cited seven safety violations along the ruptured Silvertip pipeline. Two of the warnings faulted the company for its emergency response and pipeline corrosion training.Transportation department spokeswoman Patricia Klinger said the company has since responded to the warnings and the case was closed.The company was also cited for “probable violations” in a letter in February. The problems included inadequate pipeline markers in a housing development, a section of pipeline over a ditch covered with potentially damaging material and debris, vegetation in housing area covering a portion of line that prevented aerial inspections, and a line over a canal not properly protected against corrosion.The company responded in a March letter that it had corrected all of the problems, most of them within a few weeks of being notified.The 20-year-old pipeline was last inspected in 2009 using a robotic device that travels through the line looking for corrosion, dents or other problems, Pruessing said. Tests to determine the pipeline’s depth were taken in December, and at the time, the line appeared to be 5 to 8 feet below the riverbed, he said.“It was completely in line with all regulatory requirements,” he saidThe spill is likely to amplify calls from some safety advocates and environmentalists for the government to impose more stringent regulations on the pipeline industry.Dozens of federal workers along with U.S. Coast Guard personnel joined about 120 Exxon Mobil crew members in the cleanup and containment effort at the flooded river, the EPA said.The Environmental Protection Agency said it can’t confirm any damage to wildlife or fish kills, but investigators were checking and the federal agency expected to know more Monday.Crews have been putting absorbent material along short stretches of the river in Billings and near Laurel, but no attempts were made at capturing oil farther out. In some areas, oil flowed underneath booms.There was no clear word on how far the damage extended along a scenic river famous for its fishing and vital to farmers who depend on its water for their crops.Pruessing said Sunday that flyovers had shown most of the damage from the weekend’s spill has been limited to a 10-mile stretch of river.But Gov. Brian Schweitzer dismissed Pruessing’s estimate as premature. The Democratic governor said Exxon Mobil needed to get more personnel to inspect the situation close-up. He also slammed Pruessing’s statement to reporters that no injured wildlife had been found.“For somebody to say at this early stage that there’s no damage to wildlife, that’s pretty silly,” Schweitzer said. “The Yellowstone River is important to us. We’ve got to have a physical inspection of that river in small boats — and soon.”EPA spokeswoman Sonya Pennock said its staff had spotted oil at least 40 miles downstream. There were other reports of oil as far as 100 miles away, near the town of Hysham.State officials earlier reported a 25-mile long slick headed downstream toward the Yellowstone’s confluence with the Missouri River, just across the Montana border in North Dakota. Authorities had no further reports on that slick, and Pruessing said the oil appeared to be evaporating and dissipating as the Yellowstone carries it downstream.EPA on-scene coordinator Steve Way said fast flows along the flooding river were spreading the oil over a large area, making it harder to capture. But Way said that also could reduce damage to wildlife and cropland along the river.The uncertainty frustrated riverfront property owners such as Linda Corbin, who worried that severe damage would be revealed as the flooding Yellowstone recedes in coming weeks. The stench of spilled crude was obvious in Corbin’s backyard — a reminder of the potential problems lurking beneath the surface of the nearby river.“The smell has been enough to gag a maggot,” said Corbin, 64. “I just hope it doesn’t come too far because I’m on a well, and I won’t appreciate having to shower in Exxon oil.”The spill was small compared to other oil-related disasters, such as the 11 million gallons leaked by the Exxon Valdez in Alaska in 1989. But officials said the pristine nature of the Yellowstone, along with its turbulent waters and riverside communities, complicated their cleanup efforts and attempts to assess the damage. Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

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