Hospitals installed more sinks to stop infections. The sinks can make the problem worse

first_img When it comes to hospital sinks, there are two major issues.First, the water coming into them can contain bacteria. That’s true of any sink, anywhere; municipal water treatment systems don’t produce sterile water. But a bug that isn’t a risk for a healthy person can be dangerous for someone whose immune system is suppressed to prevent rejection of a donor organ or who is recuperating from a serious operation.The other problem is that sinks, particularly the pipes that drain them, are ideal places for bacteria to proliferate. The bugs form what are known as biofilms – colonies where they gang together and attach to a surface. These water-dwelling bacteria especially like p-traps, the U-shaped bend in pipes that drain the contents of a sink.Getting rid of biofilms once they form is, well, pretty much impossible. There are cleaning tricks hospitals try, but even those generally only lower the bacterial count for a while.“Once you have the biofilms in there, short of ripping the sinks and the piping out, it’s impossible to get rid of. And in fact, even if you do that, it frequently comes back,” said Dr. Alex Kallen, a medical officer in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s division of health care quality promotion.He said it’s not entirely clear how much of a risk biofilms in hospital sinks pose. These bacterial colonies are generally — though not always — found in the pipes leading away from sinks, so people using the sinks shouldn’t, in theory, have contact with them. In fact, to see if bacteria from biofilms in sinks drains could find their way back up to contaminate hands, the CDC ran an experiment where it had people wash their hands in sinks with contaminated drains. It saw no evidence of bacteria transferring from sinks to hands.But Kallen said more experiments are underway because of the number of reports that put sinks squarely at the heart of hospital outbreaks.Gardam has firsthand experience with an outbreak caused by a sink. It was a bad one. Three dozen patients in intensive care contracted a drug-resistance bacteria; an investigation after the fact said five died because of the infection. By Helen Branswell Oct. 25, 2016 Reprints APStock In a devilish case of unintended consequences, sinks have been linked to a number of outbreaks of serious infections in hospitals from Baltimore to Shanghai and many places in between in recent years. In one notable case, a hospital in the Netherlands took sinks out of the patient rooms in its intensive care unit in a bid to slow the spread of bacteria. (It worked.)At a time when concern is mounting about antibiotic resistance, and when the specter of untreatable infections threatens the advances of modern medicine, finding ways to slow the development and spread of drug-resistant bacteria is a major preoccupation of infection control teams. As a result, evidence that hospital sinks could exacerbate the problem presents health care specialists with a quandary.advertisement Listen: Episode 13: The superbugs are winning the battle against us “The thing about the sinks is that they’re the cornerstone of infection control policy. … All of the [hospital] guidelines in the developed world talk about having sinks — the ratio of sinks per beds and where they are and that sort of thing,” said Dr. Michael Gardam, director of infection control at University Health Network, an institution comprising four Toronto hospitals. About the Author Reprints Slimy clumps of bacteria kill thousands. Scientists are fighting back Related: Tags antibiotic resistancebacteriahospital HospitalsHospitals installed more sinks to stop infections. The sinks can make the problem worse center_img Related: Helen Branswell “Once you have the biofilms in there, short of ripping the sinks and the piping out, it’s impossible to get rid of.” Hospitals should have clean sinks — for hands — and dirty sinks, for disposing of patient specimens, said Kallen. But some health care workers would argue it’s safer to tip a specimen into the nearest sink rather than walk down a hallway with something that might spill.“There does seem to be at least anecdotal evidence that if you discard patient specimens down sinks, then you can contaminate the drains with the things that are in those specimens — which, if they’re in the hospital, are more likely to be multidrug resistant [organisms],” said Kallen.“Now whether or not that’s a true source of transmission to other patients is controversial. But you certainly can contaminate the sink that way.”As problems with sinks have become apparent, experts have been working to design better and safer sinks. Watch as a superbug is bornVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2016/10/25/hospital-sinks-infections/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0002:2502:25  The superbugs are growing in number and strength. Hyacinth Empinado/STAT But even there it’s important to look for unintended consequences. For instance, a couple of studies, including one done by Perl, looked at bacterial accumulation in electronic eye faucets — the no-tap sinks where water flow is activated by placing hands in front of a sensor.The suspicion is that sinks without taps would actually reduce the risk that freshly washed hands would be recontaminated by turning off taps. But some appear to be more likely to accumulate bacteria, Perl said, explaining they have multiple internal valves and more surfaces on which biofilms can form.It’s an important lesson, she said: New sink designs need to be tested, in the way drugs are, to ensure they are actually better.“We need to start insisting on studies so that we understand the implications of introducing novel technologies before we do it,” she said.Health care specialists say concerns about hospital sinks have provided them with another lesson: Use alcohol gel. Some people still believe it dries out their skin, and it’s not effective on its own if a health care worker’s hands are soiled.But there’s no doubt that it can help curb the spread of bacteria. And it is, in fact, what the CDC recommends when hands need to be cleaned but aren’t soiled with a contaminant that gel won’t remove.“But you know, the cornerstone of hand washing isn’t sinks, it’s alcohol gel,” said Gardam. “And the reason why the world has moved to alcohol gel is that it’s a lot cheaper, it works better, it’s faster, you can wash your hands while you’re walking, it doesn’t dry your hands out as much. I can go on and on and on.” Figuring out how the patients were getting infected took sleuthing, but eventually suspicion fell on some sinks in the ICU. They had gooseneck faucets that directed water straight down into the drain. The pressure created back splash, with tiny droplets of bacteria-laced water spraying onto nearby porous surfaces where medical staff prepared tubing and other equipment used in patient care.Gardam ordered staff to stop using the sinks, going so far as encasing them in garbage bags. There were no new cases after that.The hospital subsequently made a number of changes, which have been adopted elsewhere as well, Gardam said.“Some of the stuff we’ve learned … is: Don’t have the gooseneck (faucet) drain directly into the drain; have it drain off the side of the bowl. Don’t allow it to splash. Make sure it’s deep enough that it can’t splash on you and splash on your clothing. Make sure that the stuff around [the sinks] is waterproof.”Exacerbating the problem is the fact that biofilms that develop in hospital sinks may house really bad bugs – bacteria that are resistant to key antibiotics. That’s because sinks aren’t just used to wash hands. Staff sometimes use them to dispose of patient specimens – urine, for instance – or to drain the dregs of an intravenous bag of antibiotics.“It’s just like: How do you use your kitchen sink? You dump your disgusting stuff down there and then you wash your hands,” said Dr. Trish Perl, an infection control expert who is chief of infectious diseases at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. @HelenBranswell Dr. Alex Kallen, CDC Senior Writer, Infectious Disease Helen covers issues broadly related to infectious diseases, including outbreaks, preparedness, research, and vaccine development. When you’re a patient in a hospital, you’d like to think the doctors, nurses, or orderlies standing at your bedside had recently washed their hands, wouldn’t you?You’d also probably be glad to hear that hospitals in recent years have pushed for more hand-washing stations — part of an effort to cut down on the spread of bacteria that thrive in hospitals, further compromising the health of people who are already sick.There’s a problem here, however. Those sinks have been implicated in the spread of dangerous bacteria.advertisementlast_img read more

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GTA home sales up 362% since last April, but market is starting to slow

first_img Keywords Housing However, home sales in April were down 12.7% from 15,652 in the month prior.While the first three months of the year were full of bidding wars, soaring prices and a mad scramble to snatch up any available homes, Toronto real estate broker Wins Lai is seeing conditions cool.“The stay-at-home order is definitely slowing things down a bit for people,” she said.“I have a lot of [clients looking to buy] that have sold, but they’re just waiting on the sidelines because they want to see what is the right move for them.”She’s predicting there will be another housing boom later in the spring, when more people are vaccinated and taking part in past times that were curtailed for the pandemic.She’s noticed people being more judicious about what they bid on lately and careful about following Covid-19 restrictions, but found many still want to buy now to take advantage of low interest rates.The number of homes they have to choose from is dramatically different than this time last year.New listings in April soared by 237%, when compared with last year but dropped by 8.4% when compared with March 2021, TRREB said.Many listing their homes aren’t willing to ease up on pricing, even as the market slows, because the start of the year was so hot, Lai said.“I’m working with some sellers who are not willing to bring the price down right because they think worst-case scenario, I’ll just not sell it and stay where we are,” she said.The average selling price amounted to $1,090,992, up 33% from $820,226 last April but down from $1,097,565 in March 2021.The decrease between March and April was a stark contrast to previous years when average prices typically increased between the two months and signalled the start of a flurry of spring sales.However, TRREB’s chief market analyst Jason Mercer described the decrease seen this year as “modest slowing” and pointed out that prices across all major home types remain very high.They were boosted in recent months by low borrowing costs during Covid-19, which sparked demand for housing, he said.“While the pace of price growth could moderate in the coming months, home prices will likely continue on the upward trend,” he said in a release.“Renewed population growth over the next year coupled with a persistent lack of new inventory will underpin home price appreciation.”In Toronto alone, April delivered 4,694 sales, 7,481 new listings and an average price of $1,088,02.The remaining area covered by the board and often referred to as the 905 saw 8,969 sales, 13,344 new listings and an average price of $1,090,992.While sales remained strong, TRREB president Lisa Patel called them a “marked slowing” and said they signal a pullback in activity in a market that may be fuelled by the region’s population.“We’ve experienced a torrid pace of home sales since the summer of 2020, while seeing little in the way of population growth,” she said in a release.“We may be starting to exhaust the pool of potential buyers within the existing GTA population.” Global housing prices rise amid pandemic: BIS GTA home sales down 13% between April and May: TRREB Tougher stress tests won’t chill housing market: Scotia Related news Tara DeschampsCanadian Press April delivered a record number of home sales for the Greater Toronto Area, but the market is starting to slow from the intense pace seen earlier this year, the Toronto Regional Real Estate Board said Wednesday.The Ontario-based board revealed 13,663 homes were sold in the region last month, a 362% increase from the 2,957 properties sold during the prior April, which was the first full month of the Covid-19 pandemic. House. 123RF Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Prime Minister calls on Jamaicans in the diaspora to support partnership initiative

first_imgPrime Minister calls on Jamaicans in the diaspora to support partnership initiative UncategorizedAugust 12, 2006 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller has called on Jamaicans in the Diaspora to support her partnership initiative, to move the country forward. Addressing hundreds of Jamaicans at a town hall meeting at the Medgar Evers College auditorium in Brooklyn, New York , on August 11, the Prime Minister said she was seeking partnerships with all sectors of the society, to create linkages toward advancing the development goals of the nation.One such partnership, Mrs. Simpson Miller said, would be having the Jamaican Diaspora represented at the level of the Senate.She said further that consideration would also be given for overseas Jamaicans to serve on Statutory Boards, and that more advertisements would be placed in the overseas media to attract the relevant expertise, where necessary.The Prime Minister stressed that she intended to work very closely with the Diaspora community, and to ensure that the partnerships achieve their objectives.The Prime Minister urged those in the audience and elsewhere in the Diaspora to reject persons who spread gloom and doom, and pointed out that her mission was to be Prime Minister for all Jamaica.“I urge you to put aside party political differences and one-upmanship for the benefit and development of an independent Jamaica. It’s time to stop it, it’s time to reunite, because together we can make it,” Mrs. Simpson Miller said.In a wide ranging address, the Prime Minister touched on a number of key sector areas which, she said, were critical to her vision of a new and dynamic Jamaica.She explained that her administration was giving priority attention to such areas as community development, early childhood education, and low income housing. The Prime Minister said that although crime was trending down, “one murder in Jamaica is one too many”, and that she would be working closely with the Ministry of National Security and the Commissioner of Police to arrest the situation.Mrs. Simpson Miller was presented with a proclamation from the New York State Assembly by Assemblyman, Nick Perry, recognizing her outstanding political achievements. She was also presented with a portrait of the cover of Everybody’s Magazine, which featured her in its April 2006 issue. The presentation was made by Editor, Particia Boothe.Bishop Sylveta Hamilton-Gonzales, who said prayers, presented the Prime Minister with a bouquet of flowers, in recognition of her nomination as a Woman of Great Esteem for 2006. She will be presented with the ‘Emerald’ award later this year.The Prime Minister was accompanied on the platform by Colin Campbell, Minister of Information & Development; Phillip Paulwell, Minister of Industry, Technology, Energy & Commerce, and Professor Gordon Shirley, Jamaica’s Ambassador to the United States.Consul-General in New York, Dr. Basil K. Bryan, moderated the meeting.Mrs. Simpson Miller, who is in New York as guest of the Jamaica Independence Anniversary Committee (JIAC), will deliver the keynote address at the Grand Independence Ball, to be held at the New York Hilton Hotel & Towers, Manhattan, later today. RelatedPrime Minister calls on Jamaicans in the diaspora to support partnership initiative RelatedPrime Minister calls on Jamaicans in the diaspora to support partnership initiativecenter_img Advertisements RelatedPrime Minister calls on Jamaicans in the diaspora to support partnership initiativelast_img read more

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Receipt Book System Not Taxation – Clarke

first_imgRelatedReceipt Book System Not Taxation – Clarke FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister of Agriculture and Lands, Roger Clarke, has reassured farmers that the receipt book system is not a means of taxation being levied on them by the Government.Clarifying this perception in an interview with JIS News, Minister Clarke pointed out that the receipt book would be used as a means of protecting farmers. “If they are not willing to help in protecting their produce and livestock,” he argued, “then Jamaica’s agricultural sector will be in problems”.“We made it very clear from the beginning that it has nothing to do with taxes . people operating large scale farms even get tax free accommodation much more a man with two goats,” the Minister said.He noted that while some farmers have not been co-operating with the Ministry’s thrust to get registered, there was a drive to get the additional farmers registered.The Minister pointed out that the use of receipt books was now in full effect and that 50 members from the Island Special Constabulary Force (ISCF) were trained and are ready to begin working.“When you have the receipt book system in place.when you catch a man with a goat and you ask him where he got that goat and he doesn’t present his receipt, you hold on to him. Everybody has to co-operate if the system is to work,” Mr. Clarke stressed.The receipt book is the official document of trade with the JAS, which is the sole distributor through its branch offices. It will feature a unique registration number for each farmer and this number will be used by the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA), under its Agri-Business Information System (ABIS), enabling the authorities to electronically verify the origin of the produce. In addition, the law has increased the maximum fine for breaches of the Act from $1,000 to $250,000.As at January 31, some 93,000 farmers from 13 parishes were registered under the National Farmers Registration Programme, with some 60,000 being verified as legitimate farmers to legally trade agricultural produce. Advertisements RelatedReceipt Book System Not Taxation – Clarkecenter_img Receipt Book System Not Taxation – Clarke UncategorizedNovember 15, 2006 RelatedReceipt Book System Not Taxation – Clarkelast_img read more

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Activity Decrease In Exercising Older Adults Linked To Decline In Resting Metabolism

first_img Published: April 23, 2001 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail When University of Colorado at Boulder researchers came out with a study in 1998 showing older adults who exercise regularly burn more calories at rest than their sedentary counterparts, it was good news for the active older generation. Now comes some not so good news. A new CU-Boulder study has shown that active older adults who slowed down their physical activity showed significant drops in their resting metabolism in less than a week, even though they had reduced their caloric intake accordingly. Such a metabolic slowdown can set the stage for weight gain and associated problems like increased risks for cardiovascular disease and other metabolic diseases like diabetes, said postdoctoral researcher Christopher Bell. “This is further evidence of the importance of exercise for older people,” said Bell of CU-Boulder’s department of kinesiology and applied physiology who headed up the study. “Declines in the resting metabolic rate increase the challenge of weight maintenance and most likely contribute to the high prevalence of age-associated obesity and higher incidences of related diseases.” Bell presented a paper on the findings at the Experimental Biology Meeting held in Orlando in early April. Co-authors on the study included CU graduate student Danielle Day, CU postdoctoral researcher Demetra Christou, Colorado State University researcher Kris Osterberg, CSU Professor Christopher Melby and CU-Boulder Professors Douglas Seals and Pamela Jones. For the study, the researchers monitored seven healthy male and three healthy female adults between 62 and 67 years of age who exercised regularly and had less than 25 percent body fat. The researchers restricted the subjects’ exercise by the equivalent of 400 calories a day and restricted their caloric intake by roughly the same amount. In less than a week, the resting metabolic rate declined significantly, from an average of 1,248 calories on day one to 1,155 calories on day five. “Older people who grow sedentary must continually restrict their caloric intake in order to maintain healthy weight, a change that eventually may limit their ability to achieve recommended daily allowances of vitamins and nutrients,” said Bell. Studies on active and inactive young adults in their 20s and 30s show much smaller differences in metabolic rate, said Bell. Although CU-Boulder researchers have not studied the effects of regular exercise and caloric intake on metabolic rate in active and sedentary adults in their 40s and 50s, Bell predicted the metabolic differences would fall somewhere in the middle between older and younger study subjects. “In a word, the message is exercise,” said Bell. “It is important at any age to exercise and eat nutritious foods in order to stay healthy.”last_img read more

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Two people remanded in custody in connection to Lenamore Stables fire

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Google+ Two people have been remanded in custody in connection with a major fire at Lenamore stables in Muff at the weekend.Two horses died and a woman was hospitalised following the blaze which broke out shortly before 6am on Sunday morning.The man and woman appeared before Letterkenny court this afternoon.Fire crews from Derry were first on the scene on Sunday morning while members of the Donegal fire service and An Garda Siochana also attended.It’s understood the stables owners had already made attempts to rescues the horses and while five were saved, two died.A woman in her 20s was treated for minor burns and smoke inhalation at the scene and was later transferred to hospital for treatment.The stables have been extensively damaged as a result of the blaze.The area was sealed off and following a forensic examination on Monday, the fire is now being investigated as criminal damage and arson.A man and woman were subsequently arrested in connection with the incident and taken to Buncrana Garda Station for questioning.It’s understood that that two individuals are from outside the jurisdiction.They both appeared before the courts in Letterkenny this afternoon and have been remanded in custody to appear in court again on Monday. Twitter By News Highland – November 7, 2018 Two people remanded in custody in connection to Lenamore Stables fire Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleFAI Intermediate Cup Draw: Bonagee at home / Rovers go to DublinNext articleFull Capacity Protocol in place at Letterkenny University Hospital News Highland Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationscenter_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Google+ WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebooklast_img read more

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College Seeks To Solve Civil Rights-Era Cold Case Murders

first_img 16:19Imagine having a family member murdered and never knowing who committed the act or even where your loved one is buried. It sounds like a plot from a horror story and, in fact, it is. It’s a modern day horror story that still haunts hundreds of families to this day.Between the early 1940s and late 1960s hundreds of activists in the civil rights movement were murdered across the South. Many of the victims were never found or identified – leaving their anguished families to wonder and question what became of them.Syracuse University’s Cold Case Justice Initiative wants to change that. Law students, working to help alleviate the pain and suffering even a half century later, review old information and re-investigate the cases, in the hopes that their efforts might help convince authorities to prosecute the cold case murders.The CCJI is investigating almost 200 cases, led by SU College of Law Professor Janis McDonald.McDonald and one of her students, Grady High School graduate Alphonse Williams discussed the program, what it involves, the law governing the cases and more on “A Closer Look.” 16:19 | Play story Add to My ListIn My List Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility For Whom The Bell Rings Related Stories ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Party Sharelast_img read more

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DAAD Scholarship (2019-2023) at the Graduate School Practices of Literature

first_img +1 ← Typomania typographic video contest 2019 DAAD Scholarship (2019-2023) at the Graduate School Practices of Literature Tweet Reddit Pocket Deadline: 31 May 2019Open to: international students that hold a master degree (usually in literary studies)Benefits: two scholarships are awarded to international PhD-students working in the field of literary studies DAAD DIES UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT TRAINING PROGRAMME 2021 DescriptionThe Graduate School Practices of Literature (GSPoL) at the University of Münster, Germany in- vites international students in literary studies to apply for a PhD scholarship starting on October 1, 2019. The four-year scholarship is part of the Graduate School Schol- arship Programme (GSSP) funded by the German Academic Exchange Service / Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD). The program revolves around three main research areas:Literature, Culture and Society;Theories of Literature and Culture;Literary and Cultural Studies and the Professional World.Areas of study: English/American Studies, Arabic/Islamic Studies, Baltic Studies, Book Studies, German Studies, Comparative Studies, Latin Philology/Studies, (Neo-)Medieval Latin Studies, Dutch Studies, Scandinavian Studies, Romance Stud- ies (main areas: French, Spanish and Italian Literature), Sinology, and Slavonic Stud- ies.Eligibility–  Master’s/Magister/Staatsexamen degree (usually in literary studies) with a minimum grade of “gut” (2.0);–  German, English and, possibly, additional foreign language skills according to § 5 (2) of the GSPoL study regulations1 (if necessary, the DAAD programme may include a preparatory German language course);–  applicants must have received their master’s degree (i.e. taken their last fi- nal exam) no more than six years prior to the time when the DAAD receives the nomination letter;–  applicants should not have resided in Germany for more than fifteen months prior to the nomination to the DAAD.BenefitsThe Graduate School Practices of Literature is admitted into the Graduate School Scholarship Programme (GSSP) of the DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst). In the framework of the GSSP, two scholarships are awarded to international PhD-students working in the field of literary studies.How to apply? The application has 3 steps that consists of:Step 1: Application to the GSPoL (via email as a single PDF file to [email protected]) including:–  letter of motivation stating the reasons for the application to the GSPoL–  curriculum vitae (without photograph)–  proof that the applicant has completed a master’s degree (usually in literary studies) with a minimum grade of “gut” (2.0) (according to § 5 (1) of the GSPoL study regulations)–  proof of German, English and, possibly, additional foreign language skills–  brief (approx. half-page) abstract of the PhD project–  project proposal of about 10 pages in length, including a title, table of contents, detailed outline (of the topic; its originality and significance; aims and methodology), as well as a bibliography–  timeline, including optional stays/studies abroad of up to one year in total (= 25% of the duration of the scholarship), which may not be scheduled at the beginning of the programme–  two letters of reference;Step 2: personal interview at the GSPoLStep 3: nomination to the DAAD and standard application procedure at and final de- cision by the DAADFor more information, please visit the official web page.center_img LinkedIn 0 DAAD Development-Related Postgraduate Courses (EPOS) Scholarships 2020/2021 April 9, 2019 Published by sanja DAAD In-Country/In-Region Scholarship Programme Similar Stories Share 0 EY NextWave Data Science Challenge →last_img read more

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Dow Elastomers expects rise in demand for new encapsulant materials

first_imgDow Elastomers expects rise in demand for new encapsulant materialsVideo: Michael Shoemaker, Global Strategic Marketing Manager for The Dow Chemical Company, talks encapsulants with pv magazine’s Ian Clover, highlighting what technological advancements Dow Elastomers is bringing to the market. June 29, 2016 pv magazine staff Installations Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Shoemaker compares using polyolefin elastomers with using more traditional EVA for module encapsulants, pointing towards the advantages of polyolefin elastomers. He also gives his outlook on the upcoming demand for the technology. To watch the full interview, click here.Popular content ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. 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Australian scientists specializing in aluminum-ion batteries are now working w… Solar and silver price hikes pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The PV industry has experienced several rounds of price increases since the second half of 2020, from polysilicon to mat… iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… Household solutions for maximizing self-consumption using smart contro… , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRobert van Keulen, Technical Manager, GrowattGautham Ram, Assistant Professor and Researcher, D… Reducing solar project risk for extreme weather 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsDaniel H.S. Chang, VP of Business Development | RETCGreg Beardsworth, Sr. Director of Product M… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print Solar and silver price hikes pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The PV industry has experienced several rounds of price increases since the second half of 2020, from polysilicon to mat… Pushing POE for longer module lifetimes Mark Hutchins 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Polyolefin-based films are estimated to represent around 20% of the market for PV module encapsulation materials – a sha… China’s push for decarbonization Andreas Walstad 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The carbon market is finally a reality in China. After 10 years of delays, regional pilot schemes and general uncertaint… Australia’s next wave of large-scale solar development pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Call it “latent energy” – Australia’s renewable resources are expected to help some of the world’s greatest polluters to… Korea shifts into top gear pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com There is a fresh sense of urgency and common purpose in South Korea toward combating climate change. In 2021, government… Final thought: Solar ethics, forced labor pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Abigail Ross Hopper, President and CEO, Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)Issue 04 – 2021 April 7, 2021 pv maga… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

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