Agents skewered

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Download the CARIFESTA XIV App NOW and Celebrate the Arts!

first_img You may be interested in… Aug 27, 2019 Caribbean Fashion Showroom Open for Business Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Community made incremental, appreciable progress in 2019… Nov 28, 2019 Are you ready for the ultimate access to all things CARIFESTA XIV in the palm of your hands? Then we have the news you have been waiting on! The CARIFESTA XIV App is now LIVE! CARICOM Mourns Passing of Culture Director of Antigua and… Dec 18, 2019 DOWNLOAD it for TOTAL access to all things CARIFESTA. From the exciting performances and artistes to a detailed schedule of events, this will be the go-to resource for participants, delegates and of course the wider Caribbean. You can also get live updates on CARIFESTA XIV, the greatest festival for 2019 with vibrant images, real-time video and CARIFESTA radio updates. Download the CARIFESTA XIV App NOW and Celebrate the Arts! Island Beats Issa Vibe: #CARIFESTAXIV Sep 17, 2019 Trinidad and Tobago signs CARIFESTA XIV Host Country AgreementPort of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago – As the excitement builds in the lead up to this country’s hosting of the Caribbean’s premiere Festival of the Arts in 2019, Dr. the Honourable Keith Rowley, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago signed the Host Country Agreement for CARIFESTA XIV with Ambassador…December 11, 2018In “CARICOM”CAL, Liat flight specials for CARIFESTA XIV – Time to book!Are you planning to be at CARIFESTA XIV? This year the event is being held August 15-26 in Trinidad and Tobago. Nineteen countries have confirmed their attendance at this iconic festival of the arts: 16 Caribbean Member States and Associate Members, along with Canada, Venezuela and Curacao. Get as much as 15%…May 22, 2019In “Associate Member States”Nineteen countries confirmed for CARIFESTA XIVWith five months to go to CARIFESTA XIV, 19 countries have confirmed their attendance at this premier festival of the arts from 16 – 25 August 2019, in Trinidad and Tobago. Sixteen Caribbean Member States and Associate Members have responded to the official invitation to participate in the Festival which…March 25, 2019In “Associate Member States”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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Peak Scientific ready for Brexit

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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NatWest to withdraw LPC study loan product

first_imgA decision by NatWest to cease offering preferential loans to students studying the Legal Practice Course has prompted concerns over access to the profession. NatWest, owned by Royal Bank of Scotland, is currently the only bank to offer loans under a Professional Trainee Loan scheme for College of Law and BPP students sitting the LPC, Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) and Bar Vocational Course (BVC). The bank describes its interest rates as ‘preferential’, and students have up to 10 years to repay the loan. However, it will cease offering the product to new customers from the end of April. Junior Lawyers Division spokesman Kevin Poulter said there had already been a big decline in professional skills training loans. He said: ‘This could be the final straw. Graduates from affluent backgrounds can apply to the bank of mum and dad, but most are going to struggle.’ Law Society president Linda Lee said: ‘With so much government rhetoric about opening up access to the professions to people from disadvantaged socio-economic groups, this seems a move that will further undermine that objective from a bank with 85% public ownership.’ NatWest said other loan ­products would be available for graduates. Read Rachel Rothwell’s latest news blog on the subject.last_img read more

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Cities pose real challenges for a sustainable future

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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Inchcape warns of Spanish disruption

first_imgThe strike is scheduled to run from February 18 – 22, 2013. According to Inchcape, it is anticipated that 40 percent of scheduled flights and ten percent of international flights will be grounded. Connecting flights to Malaga airport are also likely to be affected. According to Julian Isola, operations manager, ISS Algeciras and Iberia: “We anticipate that this five day strike will affect crew changes in Spanish ports and are working closely to keep customers updated.”The unions have planned further industrial action from March 4 – 9, and March 18 – 22. www.iss-shipping.comlast_img read more

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Martin Bencher opening Sydney office

first_imgJosefin Ahlgren will manage the branch in the role of managing director. Ahlgren has worked with the company for almost seven years and in that time she has opened and managed Martin Bencher’s Stockholm office and transitioned into the role of quality manager.www.martin-bencher.comlast_img

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ALE loads out in Malaysia

first_imgBefore executing the load-out, ALE devised the engineering design and structural calculations, including the design of dead man anchors, strand jack supports, ballasting calculations and procedures.According to ALE, the load-out had to be completed against a strict schedule due to the changes in tide impacting the stability of the barge.ALE used four strand jacks for the main pulling operation, each with a pulling capacity of 441.5 tonnes, and two 600-tonne capacity break out jacks, which were used to assist with breaking out the jacket from its initial position.The ballasting and deballasting operation was performed utilising the internal ballast pumps of the barge.The jacket, which was fabricated in a yard located in Pasir Gudang, will form part of the Baram Delta Gas Gathering (Bardegg) project in the Baronia Oil Field, located offshore Sarawak, Malaysia. www.ale-heavylift.comlast_img read more

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Lawyers and the new money laundering directive

first_img Jonathan Goldsmith is secretary general of the Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe, which represents about one million European lawyers through its member bars and law societies. He blogs weekly for the Gazette on European affairs Well, at least one of my predictions from last week for 2013 has come true: the draft of the fourth money laundering directive was published a few days ago, as reported by the Gazette last week. It will have important consequences for lawyers. I will just flesh out a few of those possible consequences now, since it is still too early to be certain of the exact meaning and impact of the new articles. Two proposals were published at the same time, one the expected directive, and the other a regulation on information accompanying transfers of funds to secure “due traceability” of those transfers. Both are based on the latest Recommendations of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), and – worryingly – the European Commission boasts that it goes further than the FATF in a number of fields. The EU has always been the keenest pupil in the FATF’s class, for instance introducing lawyer reporting when other important FATF members, like Japan, Canada and the US, have resisted it. This time it is proud that it has gone beyond the FATF by lowering the limit of cash allowed for payment of goods (like furs or diamonds) before triggering the provisions of the directive, from €15,000 to €7,500. The commission says that the new directive will, among other things, improve clarity and consistency of the rules across the member states, provide a clear mechanism for identification of beneficial owners, and extend the scope of the directive (for instance to gambling, and to cover tax crimes). There are some interesting new aspects regarding lawyers and our reporting duties. I make no approving or disapproving comments at this stage, because the organisation I represent, the Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe (CCBE), is still crawling through the clauses carefully. The main new article relating to lawyer reporting is Article 33.2, which corresponds to the old Article 23.2 of the third money laundering directive, and lays out the scope of the reporting duty. Much of it appears to be the same as before. However, words have been added to highlight that the exemption to reporting in relation to lawyers applies ‘only to the strict extent that such exemption relates to information’ acquired in the listed ways, which appears to be more stringent than before. And it now also becomes mandatory for member states, and not just optional, to apply this exemption for lawyer reporting. The most interesting aspect of the draft directive for lawyers might turn out to be the attempt by the commission to codify the recent Michaud case (12323/11) before the European Court of Human Rights. That was the case which raised the question of whether a lawyer’s duty to report suspicious transactions under the money laundering legislation breached the European Convention of Human Rights, in particular Article 8 (right to respect for private and family life). The Court found, in the particular circumstances of France, that – among other things – the reporting which took place through the filter of the president of the bar was sufficient protection for professional secrecy. Just to clarify for those unfamiliar with the French system: in France, lawyers do not report suspicious transactions directly to the Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU), but rather to the president of their bar, who decides whether the report should be transmitted onwards to the FIU. Now recital 27 of the draft directive states that: ‘In line with the case law of the European Court of Human Rights, a system of first instance reporting to a self-regulatory body constitutes an important safeguard to uphold the protection of fundamental rights as concerns the reporting obligations applicable to lawyers.’ And there is an article which captures the point later in the new draft. The question – and it is no more than that at this stage – is whether the French system of reporting suspicious transactions through the president of the bar will now spread to other bars. It is already in use beyond France. Would the UK, for instance, think of implementing it? Is it safer all round, more protective of professional secrecy, than direct lawyer reporting? Does it put what might turn out to be an unbearable responsibility on the president of the bar? Of course, the exceptionally high number of reports in the UK compared to other member states might make this way forward in any way impractical, regardless of the principle of whether it is a good thing. As you can see, there is likely to be a spirited struggle ahead, as happened with previous directives on the same topic. We will need time to absorb and discuss its nuances. Lawyers, be warned.last_img read more

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Defrosted point

first_imgPRORAIL completed its first large-scale installation of Icesolution geothermal point heaters in sidings at Lelystad during December. Developed by Holland Rail Consult and Volker Stevin Rail & Traffic, Icesolution uses heat extracted from the ground to prevent the build-up of ice (RG 8.03 p513). The heaters come on only when needed, giving an 80% reduction in energy consumption compared to conventional heaters. The initial investment is higher than for conventional heaters, but ProRail expects to recover the costs within five years, and make significant savings over the 20-year life of Icesolution.Holland Rail Consult, Netherlandslast_img read more

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