22 Notre Dame students awarded fellowships

first_imgMembers of the class of 2017 received an array of prestigious fellowships and awards this year, including two Rhodes Scholarships and 15 Fulbright grants.Jeffrey Thibert, interim director of the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), said the Rhodes Scholarship process is intensely selective.“For Rhodes, this year there were 882 candidates, and they chose 32,” Thibert said. “We had two of them.”Thibert said the Rhodes Scholarship supports two years of study at the University of Oxford for a graduate degree or another undergraduate degree. Here, he said, senior Rhodes Scholarship recipients Alexis Doyle and Grace Watkins will study alongside the other 30 U.S. Rhodes Scholars, as well as many others from around the world.“As with most fellowships, a key part of the experience is connecting with a cohort of future leaders from around the world at Oxford who are also Rhodes Scholars,” Thibert said.Doyle, a biology and peace studies double major, said she initially planned to take a gap year and do social work before medical school, but was pushed by professors to apply for the scholarship.“A couple professors explained to me that it would be a good opportunity to get a platform on which I could advocate at a larger scale for the things I care about,” she said.After working at the American Public Health Association in Washington, D.C. after her junior year, Doyle said she realized she had a passion for public health policy.“The health of the most vulnerable will be determined by policies,” she said. “I would really love to study policy in greater depth, and the Rhodes will give me an opportunity to do that before going to medical school.”Being a Rhodes Scholar will also provide Doyle with an opportunity to learn from the other students in the program at Oxford, she said.“I think a huge part of my education here has been being able to interact with peers who have all of these ideas outside of my field of study that are so fascinating and have influenced my thought on a bunch of things,” Doyle said. “I’ll get to meet a lot of people at Oxford that will have a positive influence on me and the way that I think.”In addition to Doyle and Watkins’s Rhodes Scholarships, 15 members of the class of 2017 received grants from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, Thibert said.“The Fulbright Program is our biggest fellowship in terms of students applying,” he said. “What the Fulbright U.S. Student Program does is provide opportunities for students to spend a year after graduation doing study, research or English teaching.”Ten of the Fulbright Scholars were offered English Teaching Assistantship grants from the Fulbright program in several countries around the world. Haley Adams and David Arney will complete their assistantships in Poland, Dana Drysdale will complete hers in South Korea, John Gadient will complete his in Germany, Madeline Hahn and Joseph Rebagliati will complete theirs in Spain, Maya Jain will complete hers in Peru, Peter Stankiewicz will complete his in Russia and Connor Bliss and Dolores Vargas declined their assistantship offers.Gadient, who will graduate with a degree in international economics with German, said the uniqueness of the opportunity is part of what drew him to it.“It’s an experience I wouldn’t be able to get with any other job or graduate school,” Gadient said. “This is something that I can’t do anywhere else.”Gadient has studied abroad in Germany twice — in Freiburg after his freshman year and in Heidelberg during his junior year — and said his desire to return to the country contributed to his decision to apply for the grant.“I wanted to go back to Germany,” Gadient said. “While I was there I actually got to become a part of the community I was living in, and [the assistantship is a] way to go back and give back to the people.”The other five Fulbright Scholars from the Class of 2017 were awarded research grants. Sara Abdel-Rahim will complete her research in Greece, Luke Donahue and Matthew O’Neill will both complete theirs in Germany, Kiley Adams will complete hers in India and Daniel Barabasi declined his research grant offer.Four more seniors — Bradley Bowles, Julia Butterfield, Paulina Eberts and Sreeraahul Kancherla — received Graduate Research Fellowships from the National Science Foundation (NSF). According to its website, the program “recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees.”Additionally, senior political science major Jenny Ng received full funding for a one-year Master’s of China Studies program at Yenching Academy — a distinguished college within Peking University — and senior applied and computational mathematics and statistics major John Huber received a prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship.CUSE plays a crucial role in setting students up for success in these fellowship application processes, Thibert said.“The idea behind CUSE was that the kind of scholarly engagement that we try to enable students to do — like undergraduate research, service learning and internships — we try to connect students to the different resources on campus and beyond campus for doing those things,” he said.By giving students access to these resources, Thibert said, CUSE hopes to propel them to research and experiences that can make them valuable candidates for fellowships.“The students who do those things and excel in those areas might be the very same students who would be strong candidates for fellowships,” he said. “We build a strong relationship with students by working with them on scholarly engagement, and so then they already know and have this relationship with us when they become interested in fellowships.“In these past few years, we’ve seen consistent growth first in the number of students who are engaging with CUSE in different ways. That includes workshops we give about undergraduate research, one-on-one advising we do to give students feedback on proposals for research grants and fellowships. We’ve also seen growth overall in the number of students applying for fellowships and in the number receiving fellowships.”Thibert said CUSE hopes to expose students to opportunities that can change the course of their lives for the better.“I think generally one of the benefits of these fellowships is they tend to allow you to make connections that will open doors that you didn’t even know were there,” he said. “I think a lot of people go into an internship with one life plan, and they come out the other end with a slightly revised life plan because of the opportunities they were offered through that fellowship.”Tags: Class of 2017, Fellowships, Fulbright Scholars, Fulbright U.S. Student Program, Gates Cambridge Scholarship, NSF Graduate Research Fellowships, Rhodes Scholarslast_img read more

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VSP: I-91 fatal crash as truck crosses median

first_imgVermont State Police On 06-28-2018 at 07:33 am Vermont State Police responded to the report of a two car motor vehicle crash on Interstate 91 in the Town of Hartland. The crash occurred in the area of mile marker 60 north bound near Exit 9. Investigation revealed that the 2008 Chevy truck being operated by Joshua Rondeau of Charlestown, NH, was traveling south bound on I91, lost control and crossed the median striking the 2007 Toyota Matrix head on which was traveling north bound. The operator of the Toyota Matrix, 36 year old Laura McNaughton of Perkinsville, VT was pronounced dead at the scene, her 8 year old child, Isaac McNaughton sustained non-life threatening injuries and was transported to Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center. The operator of the Chevy truck and two juvenile occupants, 8 year old Makayla Rondeau and 11 year old Shane Esh were also transported to DHMC with non-life threatening injuries. I91 north bound was closed for a period of time at exit 9 while crash investigators completed their on scene investigation. It was reopened at approximately 1:00 pm. Investigation to the cause of the crash is ongoing at this time.Story: One dead, three children injured in I-91 crash in Hartland (link is external)CASE#: 18B202636                                          RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Corporal Mark HarveySTATION: VSP Royalton                                           CONTACT#: 802-234-9933DATE/TIME: 06-28-2018 07:33AMSTREET: Interstate 91 North BoundTOWN: HartlandLANDMARK AND/OR CROSS STREETS: Exit 9INTERSTATE MILE MARKER: mm60WEATHER: Rain           ROAD CONDITIONS: WetVEHICLE #1OPERATOR: Joshua RondeauAGE: 37    SEAT BELT? YCITY, STATE OF RESIDENCE: Charlestown, NHVEHICLE YEAR: 2008VEHICLE MAKE: ChevroletVEHICLE MODEL: SilveradoVEHICLE #2OPERATOR: Laura McNaughtonAGE:  36   SEAT BELT? YCITY, STATE OF RESIDENCE: Perkinsville, VTVEHICLE YEAR: 2007VEHICLE MAKE: ToyotaVEHICLE MODEL: MatrixDAMAGE TO VEHICLE #1: Total LossDAMAGE TO VEHICLE #2: Total Losslast_img read more

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Senate hearing held on Sanders’ legislation to expand dental care for veterans

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee held a hearing Wednesday afternoon to consider legislation authored by US Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) to expand access to dental care for veterans.“The goal of my legislation is really pretty simple: to improve and expand access to dental care for veterans throughout the country,” said Sanders, who is a longtime member and former chair of the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee. “Today, millions of veterans have access to timely, high-quality health care through the VA.  However, very few of these veterans have access to dental care through the VA. To my mind, this doesn’t make sense. The evidence is very clear that a person’s oral health is directly linked to a person’s general health.” “If a person has oral health problems – problems with their teeth or their gums – those problems can cause serious diseases and illnesses, everything from heart disease to premature births,” Sanders said.Sanders’ legislation would create a three-year pilot program to test the idea of ensuring all veterans who are eligible for VA health care are also eligible for VA dental care.Sanders’ legislation also gives the VA the authority to provide restorative dental care services to veterans. “That means if the VA pulls a veteran’s tooth to prepare them for surgery, they will be able to then furnish the veteran with dentures or implants. We know that missing teeth can have a huge impact on a person’s life. It can affect their mental health, their ability to get or keep a job, or – quite simply – make it hard for them to eat,” Sanders said.Sanders’ legislation also would empower the VA to provide veterans education and training on effective oral hygiene. “That’s another common-sense, low-cost solution that will help veterans take care of themselves, prevent problems and save the system money,” Sanders said.Under Sanders’ legislation, the VA would be required to build or lease a dental clinic in any state that doesn’t already have one. This is essential to veterans in Vermont since the VA does not currently offer any onsite dental care at any of the eight facilities that serve Vermont’s veterans.Sanders’ measure also allows the VA to carry out a demonstration program that uses alternative dental care providers – like those who will be trained through Vermont Technical College’s new dental therapy program – as a low-cost way of improving access to dental care for veterans. Finally, Sanders’ legislation includes a provision that would extend access to dental care to veterans who are eligible for VA health care due to toxic exposures. “Many veterans from the Vietnam War, and other eras who were exposed to toxic chemicals by their own government, have terrible problems with their teeth,” Sanders said. “I think we should all be able to agree that these veterans deserve to have their oral health care covered.” Wednesday’s Senate hearing included testimony from VA Under Secretary for Benefits Paul Lawrence, as well as representatives from several veterans service organizations, including Rick Weidman, executive director for policy and government affairs for the Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA).Weidman, a native Vermonter, said in his written testimony, “VVA most definitely endorses and fully supports this pilot project, and Senator Sanders’ initiative.”Likewise, the Veterans of Foreign Wars supported Sanders’ legislation – specifically emphasizing their support for the provision that requires the VA to have a dental clinic in every state. “This draft legislation would also provide the Secretary with the authority to construct or lease a dental clinic for any state that does not currently have a VA facility that offers dental services. The VFW finds this to be incredibly important, as veterans must have access to dental care and they should not have to cross state lines to obtain that care,” Gerald Manar, former director of the National Veterans Service at the Veterans of Foreign Wars, said in his written testimony.“Right now, there are veterans out there who are suffering because Congress hasn’t made sure that our laws have kept pace with the medical community,” Sanders said. “I think we owe it to our veterans to right this wrong. We owe it to veterans to make sure the VA is leading the way.”Source: WASHINGTON, Aug. 1 – Sanderslast_img read more

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Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_imgThe Prairie Village pool will stay open until 10 p.m. Friday.Johnson County manager says state policy prompts need for property tax hike. Johnson County Manager Hannes Zacharias said last week that the state’s decision to phase out the mortgage registration fee is to blame for the need to raise property taxes in the county for the first time in eight years. The proposed 2015 budget includes a .814 mill increase, translating to about $23.28 for the average homeowner. The county is looking to replace about $49 million dollars that will be lost over the next five years from the elimination of the mortgage registration fee.[Zacharias blames state lawmakers for budget woes — Kansas City Star]Register to continuelast_img read more

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Well Done Shiv!

first_img Jul 4, 2020 Aug 17, 2020 ‘The Wehby Report’ Distributed to CWI Stakeholders (Windies Cricket Press Release) ST JOHN’S, Antigua – For 21 years he thrilled fans in the West Indies and all over the world. (On), October 25, he received the Honorary Doctor of Laws by the University of the West Indies. We salute Shivnarine Chanderpaul. The 44-year-old is one of the most outstanding batsmen in West Indies history. He is presently one of the CWI Ambassadors for the ICC Women’s World T20 tournament – to be played in the West Indies from November 9 to 24. Jennifer Nero, Director of CWI and Tournament Director of ICC Women’s World T20, paid a special tribute to Chanderpaul. Related Posts Special tribute for The Shadow at UWI graduation(The University of the West Indies Press Release) ST. AUGUSTINE, Trinidad and Tobago. October 23, 2018 – The University of the West Indies (UWI) joins the national community in mourning the passing of Mr. Winston Mc Garland Bailey, The Shadow, one of Trinidad and Tobago’s most prolific singers/ songwriters. Mr.…October 24, 2018In “CARICOM”Chanderpaul retires from cricketST. JOHN’S, Antigua, January 22 – Shivnarine Chanderpaul has officially retired from international cricket almost 22 years after making his debut. The durable left-handed batsman, affectionately known as ‘Tiger’, formally notified the West Indies Cricket Board in an email that he will no longer be available for selection for West…January 22, 2016In “CARICOM”Calypsonian and Cricketer to get UWI DoctoratesCalypso legend Winston Bailey, better known at The Mighty Shadow, will have all reason to “dingolay” this October, as three weeks after he celebrates his 77th birthday, he will be awarded an honorary doctorate from The University of the West Indies’ St Augustine campus. Bailey is one of five people…August 8, 2018In “Culture”Share this on WhatsAppcenter_img “We want to congratulate Shivnarine Chanderpaul on this significant honour by UWI. It is well deserved. He is an outstanding West Indian, a truly remarkable person who rose to become one of the finest cricketers in West Indies history. A student of the game, a wise head, a strong individual, a leader and fine example to the young people of this region,” Nero said. “He has demonstrated by virtue of his commitment and performances that once you are prepared to work hard you will reap reward, respect and global acclaim.” Read more at: Windies Cricket Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CARICOM mourns loss of cricket icon Jul 29, 2020 CDB hails Arthur as Steadfast, Passionate Defender of… last_img read more

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Proterra Names John Walsh As Senior Vice President Of Sales

first_imgAdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementProterra, a provider of heavy-duty electric transportation, has announced that John Walsh has joined the company as senior vice president of sales. With nearly three decades of experience in the mobility industry and particular expertise in the heavy-duty vehicle sector, Walsh brings a track record of helping grow companies disrupting the transportation industry. Walsh will lead Proterra’s bus sales business, helping to continue the company’s success in the North American market.“As more transit agencies and cities make the transition to battery-electric bus fleets, we are thrilled to have a seasoned industry executive leading our sales team,” said Proterra CCO Matt Horton. “John’s extensive knowledge of the heavy-duty and specialty vehicle industries, and his experience with innovative transportation technologies will be an asset as the electric bus market enters full maturity.”Most recently, Walsh was president and chief operating officer of Davey Coach Sales, Inc., one of the leading dealers of new and used mid-sized buses and shuttles in North America. Prior to that, he served as president of the REV Group, one of the largest bus manufacturing groups in the United States. Walsh also vice president of sales and marketing at ARBOC Specialty Vehicles and CEO of VPG Autos, maker of the MV-1, the first purpose-built wheelchair-accessible car. Before that, Walsh spent more than two decades at National Bus Sales & Leasing, Inc. and served as president, where he grew National from a small school bus dealership to the largest bus dealership at the time.Advertisement“Electric buses are taking over the transit bus industry and Proterra is the company that is positioned best to succeed in the market with the only buses that are truly designed from the ground up to be battery-electric,” said Walsh. “I look forward to working with a great team as we continue to bring the best technology to transit agencies and a cleaner, quieter ride to the public.”The electric bus market is growing as more cities continue to set ambitious goals to move fleets to 100-percent electric. Recently, the California Air Resources Board adopted the Innovative Clean Transit regulation, requiring state public transit agencies to transition to 100-percent zero-emission vehicles by 2040. With more than 90 customers throughout North America, Proterra has continued to see strong growth in the transit market. The company says Walsh’s leadership in this market strengthens its readiness to meet increasing demand for zero-emission buses.last_img read more

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Special Olympics Torch Run

Share The Law Enforcement Torch Run to raise awareness and support for the Special Olympics stepped off from the Montauk IGA at 9 AM on June 4 and arrived at the East Haampton Village Police Department shortly after 11:15 AM.         There, the more than 50 officers who took part in the run and were escorted by motorcycle officers from various East End departments, were cheered on by a group of East Hampton school children, and served lunch.         The torch run is one of many being held across New York State leading up to the Special Olympics New York Summer Games, which will be held in Poughkeepsie on June 14 and 15.         Closer to home, Hampton Bays High School will once again hold the regional games on Sunday, June 9, from 8 AM to 4 PM. Volunteers can visit the school district’s website, www.hbsschools.us, for more information. read more

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Code of Conduct – several important areas in need of greater clarity

first_imgThough the new Code of Conduct has been updated, it is still unclear in its wording and could lead unwary solicitors into allegations of practising while uncertificated. In previous Gazette articles I drew attention to the problems posed for in-house and local government lawyers by the application of the Solicitors Practice Rules (SPR) and rule 20.01 of the Code of Conduct 2007. One only needed a practising certificate if held out as a solicitor or if undertaking the reserved activities (such as conducting litigation or obtaining grants of probate). The Law Society’s enforcement philosophy, however, took a much wider view, and this led to many unfair regulatory investigations under the SPR. This philosophy was codified and expanded with the introduction of the 2007 code and the requirement to hold a practising certificate if undertaking ‘business services’. The 2007 code drew much criticism from, among others, the Commerce & Industry (C&I) Group, which tirelessly pursued negotiations with the Solicitors Regulation Authority to bring the code into line with primary legislation. My firm was involved with those negotiations for the C&I Group, and that lobbying led to important amendments being achieved in the 2009 revisions (the 2009 code, in force from 31 March 2009). Tony Guise is a partner at Guise and a member of the Solicitors Assistance Scheme and the duty solicitor rota at the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal Undefined servicesIn particular, the introduction of a new guidance note (number 55) set out the requirements of primary legislation. Unfortunately, the 2009 code (in rule 20.02) remains at odds with primary legislation. The SRA has gone further in that the phrase ‘business services’, which gave rise to so much uncertainty in the 2007 code, has been replaced by the equally enigmatic term ‘other services’ in the 2009 code. Like ‘business services’, the term ‘other services’ remains undefined in the glossary. Rule 20.02, of course, takes precedence over the helpful guidance in note 55. When the use of the phrase ‘other services’ was first mooted with me as a possible solution on a visit to the SRA’s Redditch office in November 2008, I expressed concern that this phrase did not assist in arriving at a clear understanding of when a solicitor would, or would not, require a practising certificate. The officers explained that ‘other services’ included the kind of services that people of business affairs would provide, but this, it seems to me, only serves to confuse the issue further. During the course of the next 12-24 months the code must be amended again to facilitate alternative business structures, and I hope the SRA takes the opportunity to sort out the mess on that occasion. The representative Law Society would perform a great service to in-house and local government lawyers by making appropriate representations to the SRA about this matter. The problems that the present drafting create may lead many in-house and local government lawyers to become unnecessarily subject to protracted and expensive regulatory investigation. This begins when, for whatever reason, someone on the roll of solicitors but not holding a practising certificate applies for a certificate. This usually requires an explanation to be given in form RFs12 of how the solicitor has spent his or her time and whether they have been undertaking the reserved activities or have been held out. The introduction of the SRA Practising Regulations 2009 has brought a new form (REG3) to be completed. This omits the questions in section 6 of RFs12 that tended to lead to self-incrimination. In form REG3, section 6 simply asks: ‘Have you practised or been held out as a solicitor/REL since you last held a practising certificate or had registration? If “yes” please provide details on a separate sheet.’ This is an exercise that calls for great care lest an applicant leave himself or herself open to allegations of practising while uncertificated or being other than frank with the regulator, potentially a breach of the core principles in rule 1. So despite the improvements secured by the C&I Group, there still remains much to sort out.last_img read more

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Negligence

first_img Wilkin-Shaw v Fuller and Kingsley School: Queen’s Bench Division (Mr Justice Owen): 28 June 2012 The first defendant was employed as a teacher at the second defendant school. He was also team manager for the purposes of the Ten Tors Expedition (the expedition). The expedition was an annual event held on Dartmoor and organised by the Ministry of Defence (MoD). In 2006, the first defendant attended the Ten Tors Manager’s training weekend and, thereafter, trained teams of students to participate in future expeditions. The first defendant approached a number of different organisations and individuals with a view to gaining more training himself and to train students who were intending on going on the expedition. Training was also field-based with practices taking place on school grounds as well as practice walks in other locations. The expedition involving student Charlotte Shaw (CS), who was aged 14, took place in March 2007. Ahead of the expedition, the route plan and a tracing of the route were sent to the MoD, in accordance with the expedition rules. On the first day of the expedition, the first defendant, the participating students, and a team of six adults, successfully completed the planned route and camped for the night. That evening, it was decided that the group had shown sufficient ability to progress to remote supervision, involving the group walking unaccompanied and being met at check points. The next day, one member of the group was unable to continue with the expedition and the remaining group continued without the first defendant who accompanied her off the moor. The group reached Watern Tor on the route of the expedition, and had expected to meet two of the adult group members but they were not there. The first defendant was telephoned by one of the group at Watern Tor and he told the group that the two adults were on their way to meet them. At Watern Tor, the group met a scoutmaster, W. The first defendant spoke with W over the telephone and took W’s advice that the group were getting cold and should continue to walk. The group initially attempted to cross Walla Brook but found that they could not. The first defendant was telephoned by a student, CK, to inform him of this and an alternative route was advised by the first defendant. When the group returned to Watern Tor, W stated that he would accompany the group to a crossing point on Walla Brook. CS had been the last member of the group making the crossing. In his witness statement, W stated that CS had attempted to throw her rucksack ahead of her but it had dropped. She had gone to grab the rucksack and it pulled, toppled her and dragged her in to the stream. CS was swept away by the strong current and drowned. The claimant, the mother of CS, issued a claim against the first and second defendant seeking damages for personal injury, namely a chronic grief reaction and severe Post Traumatic Stress Disorder resulting from the death of CS, and as administratrix of CS’s estate, seeking damages for loss to the estate. The claimant contended that the death of CS, and the consequential loss and injury both to herself and CS’s estate, were caused by the negligence of the first and/or second defendants. The claim would be dismissed. The claimant had not established that the defendants were in breach of their duty of care. The first defendant had approached the exercise in a methodical and highly conscientious manner with evident attention to detail. The group had been alerted to the risks to which water crossing gave rise and had been given appropriate guidance as to how to address such risks. Further, the team that had been assembled by the first defendant had had the appropriate experience to enable him to safely manage the training exercise with their assistance. Furthermore, the decision to allow the group to walk unaccompanied on the second day could not be said to have been negligent. It had been taken after careful consideration and after a strong performance by the group on the first day and the manner in which the group had completed the first two legs of the second morning in adverse conditions. Finally, the advice given by the first defendant over the telephone to CK had not been negligent. The instruction not to attempt to cross the Walla Brook had been entirely appropriate. In any event, had there been a breach of the duty of care, the intervention of W had broken the chain of causation (see [62], [70], [76], [97], [134] – [136] of the judgment). Causation – Breach of duty causing or contributing to damagecenter_img Dr Michael Powers QC, Mark McDonald and Brent McDonald (instructed by Ashfords solicitors) for the claimant; Ronald Walker QC, Neville Spencer-Lewis and Henry Charles (instructed by Plexus Law solicitors) for the defendants.last_img read more

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CoA advertising for full-time judicial assistants

first_imgNew entrants to the legal profession are being offered the chance to gain experience at the Court of Appeal bench in the latest round of recruitment for judicial assistants. HM Judiciary is advertising 21 fixed-term 10-month posts as assistants to the CoA civil division.Assistants will be assigned to justices of appeal to help in preparing cases by analysis of the appeal papers, legal research and the drafting of summaries. From time to time they are requested to assist with research into specific subjects of interest in the law or the administration of justice, the advertisement states. While there is ‘no fixed profile’ for successful applicants, the scheme is intended to provide entrants to the legal profession with an opportunity to work at close quarters with judicial members of the court, to view the appeals process and to appreciate appellate advocacy at close quarters. The advertisment cautions that: ’Candidates should understand that a judicial assistant works full time. It is not possible to conduct professional practice or to devote significant time to external study while working as a judicial assistant.’last_img read more

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