Governor Issues Rules For Vehicle Sales During Pandemic

first_imgGov. Michelle Lujan GrishamSTATE News:Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has authorized automobile sales by small dealers on an appointment basis utilizing strict social distancing practices during the COVID-19 Stay at Home Order.Additionally, online/Internet sales by all licensed New Mexico motor vehicle dealers are allowed.“This is great news for New Mexicans,” said Marc Powell, CEO of the New Mexico Independent Automobile Dealers Association. “New Mexico’s transportation system is built around the automobile. There are more than 1,000 small independent car dealers in every city and town in New Mexico. And the majority of cars bought and sold in New Mexico are by these small dealers.”The new rules:The customer and licensed automobile dealer must communicate about the vehicle over Internet, phone or text;No more than one appointment at the dealership at a time, with no more than two clients at each appointment;All parties must follow strict 10-foot social distancing;At the agreed time the dealer alone will greet clients. Clients may not enter the dealership alone or come into contact with any other dealership employees;Vehicles must be thoroughly disinfected before and after any test drive;Each appointment allows for test drives of two vehicles; andAll paperwork including closing will take place outside, with clients either in a vehicle or outside.“It’s virtually impossible to buy a car that costs $10,000 or less without a test drive due to the age and condition of the vehicles,” Powell said. “Many people aren’t aware that the average New Mexico vehicle is almost 14 years old – meaning many are due to be replaced. Additionally, private vehicles are needed for essential workers, especially first responders whose vehicles may have been stolen, totaled in an accident or cannot be repaired.“All New Mexico dealers applaud Gov. Lujan Grisham’s rapid action to protect New Mexico from the worst effects of this pandemic. We support all efforts to limit the spread while also serving our communities with safe, reliable transportation options,” Powell said.last_img read more

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Jones Lang LaSalle cancels after failing to fill catalogue

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Cannabis In Modern Day Wellness

first_imgIndependent/Liza BiggerThe panel discussion “Cannabis in Modern Day Wellness,” hosted by Mike Sill and Beau Schmitt, co-founders of the full spectrum CBD product line Sunday Scaries, took place at The Surf Lodge in Montauk August 1. The pair teamed up with other notable businesspeople in the industry to discuss the uncertainty in running a cannabis brand, where the industry is heading, and how to stay relevant in an increasingly competitive market, along with an array of other topics around each of the panelists’ brand stories.Sagan Schultz, MD, MBA, co-founder and CEO of WellWell, a plant-based beverage line, moderated the panel. Other speakers included Hilary McCain, founder of Sweet Reason, a hemp CBD-infused sparkling water line; a representative from Toast CBD, an all-natural hemp extract additive; and a PAX panelist, from the company that creates loose leaf, concentrate, and extract vaporizers. Sharelast_img read more

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Linde deploys additional 20 LNG fueled trucks in its US fleet

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Zurich to cut new PII business ‘significantly’

first_imgOne of the top three solicitors’ professional indemnity insurers will ‘significantly’ cut the number of new law firms it takes on this year, the Gazette can reveal. Zurich, which had a 13% share of the solicitors’ professional indemnity insurance (PII) market last year, said that it has decided to ‘significantly reduce capacity for new business’ this year because it needs to control its exposure to the assigned risks pool (ARP). The news will come as a blow to more than 3,000 law firms and sole practitioners who may need to find alternative cover during the coming renewals season because of the expected departure of Quinn from the market, and an announcement by Hiscox that it is pulling out of solicitors’ PII altogether. Zurich covers the full range of the profession, from sole practitioners to international firms. Market sources indicated that there are no new insurers presently seeking to enter the solicitors’ PII market. Zurich legal professions manager Jenny Screech said: ‘We have a significantly reduced capacity for new business because we need to control our exposure to the ARP. We have been engaged with actuaries for a number of weeks, trying to work out what our involvement will be this year. We need to very carefully control our capacity, and we will have a much reduced capacity.’ The reduced capacity relates to new business rather than renewals for existing customers. Screech declined to comment directly on which types of firm are most likely to be affected by Zurich’s decision, but said: ‘The difficulty for the profession is going to be the one- two- and three-partner firms. It’s unfortunate that there isn’t a market solution for the problems this year. If we had been able to achieve some change this year, the profession would have been looking at a very different scenario now.’ Meanwhile, the Solicitors Regulation Authority has announced a tough new enforcement ­programme aimed at firms in the ARP that have not paid their premiums. It said these firms will face regulatory sanctions, court action, and/or an intervention, and those that have not paid their ARP premium by October will be closed down. The Law Society welcomed the action. President Linda Lee said it ‘should reduce the costs of the ARP, which are ultimately borne by the profession, help to create a more affordable solicitors’ PII market and improve protection for the public’. She added: ‘The Society has been calling for a more rigorous management of the ARP for sometime and we will be providing extra funding to enable the SRA to implement the new measures effectively.’ The ARP is the insurer of last resort for firms that cannot obtain insurance on the open market. It charges punitively high premiums, which many ARP firms fail to pay. As at 14 June, £4.5m of ARP premium was due for the 2008/09 indemnity year, and only £2m had been paid. Claims against ARP firms in that year are estimated at £41m. The shortfall in premiums and the cost of claims is paid for by insurers in proportion to their share of the solicitors’ PII market.last_img read more

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Liam Fox finds his inner lawyer

first_imgPoliticians, especially when in government, find lawyers and the law make good knocking copy. As my colleague John Hyde reported in a blog from the Conservative Party Conference, MP Ben Gummer was more colloquial than most in telling solicitors to ‘get real’ and stop ‘irresponsible’ opposition to government plans on legal aid. But Gummer’s attitude was fairly typical. Any number of initiatives have aimed to remove lawyers from disputes, based on the idea that representation ‘clouds’ the real issues. The annual naming of top-earning/fat cat legal aid barristers has ‘coincided’ with announcements on changes to legal aid rates and eligibility more than once. Successive home secretaries have openly railed against the judiciary when decisions have not gone their way. So I find it interesting that, faced with revelations that could end their time in office, formerly straight-talking politicians become suddenly quite legalistic in their world-view. The defence secretary Liam Fox is the latest figure to find his inner lawyer, twisting through a series of carefully worded denials about the presence, role, access and influence of his friend Adam Werrity. Werrity’s near-omnipresence on Fox’s trips (18), and the regularity of his access to the secretary of state at the Ministry of Defence (22 visits) appear irregular, especially when set beside the defence-related interest of Werrity’s policy-focused charity. If Fox survives, it is likely to be on ‘narrow’ legal and quasi-legal findings. The argument will run that Werrity’s access was inappropriate, but that no departmental decisions were changed as a result of that access. It may be that the ministerial code, as shadow defence secretary Jim Murphy alleged, was broken, but that, again Fox didn’t change his mind on anything, and that businessmen like Harvey Boulter didn’t pay cash for access. All of which will rather misses the point on several counts. First the Ministerial Code, while noting circumstances under which a minister should offer the prime minister their resignation, is ‘designed to be a helpful guide to ministers’. It is not an extension of the criminal law, and the lack of a criminal prosecution should not be used to prove that the code was not breached. The Code is, in effect, a piece of self-regulation – as concerned with perception as actual wrong-doing. For example, Section 7 concerning ministers’ private interests, which is among those that Murphy cites, says: ‘Ministers must ensure that no conflict arises, or could reasonably be perceived to arise, between their public duties and their private interests, financial or otherwise.’ Second, the commercial advantage that a businessman gains by access may not be down to influencing a minister. As Boulter’s own account of his follow-up actions to his meeting with Fox in Dubai seems to show, perceived proximity to a minister can be an advantage. In this case, Boulter made known his meeting with Fox to manufacturer 3M to gain leverage in a commercial dispute. This happened without Fox’s knowledge, but the informal meeting made Boulter’s actions possible. Then there is the matter of Werrity himself, and his own interests here. From what we know, he runs a policy-related charity, for which he is reported to pay himself £90,000. Not enough is known at this stage to comment directly on his financial affairs or funding for his activities. But it won’t be enough to show that he has not received payment for arranging meetings. The modus operandi of US think tanks, especially on the political right, around politics, lobbying and interest show the way that money can be made available – the route is to fund other related matters. Influential people, who have access to those in power, may be paid overly generous ‘expenses’ and ‘speaker fees’, and reports, research, or ‘white papers’ are commissioned at a superannuated rate. In a similar scenario, journalist Peter Oborne recently alleged former prime minister Tony Blair had been paid £27m to ‘consult’ on the future of the Kuwaiti economy, including the production of a ‘report’ that included some fairly derivative recommendations. (Tony Blair Associates say the figure paid was lower, but will not reveal what it was.) The point is, there doesn’t need to be a specific invoice, recorded conversation or an email for wrong-doing to have occurred, helpful though Fox and Werrity’s detractors would find that. For that is not necessarily how ‘business’ is done in this world – and the failure of an investigation to turn up that sort of smoking gun evidence, would fall short of a full exoneration for Fox.last_img read more

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Raising a stink

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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On the soapbox

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Bureau Veritas issues guidance for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

first_imgThe guidelines specify the environmental conditions under which floating offshore wind turbines may serve, the principles of structural design, load cases for the platform and mooring system, stability and the structural division and design criteria for the top structure.The Guidance Note NI 572 covers floating platforms supporting single- or multiple-turbines with horizontal or vertical axes.Maxime Pachot, offshore wind turbine manager, Bureau Veritas, says, “There is growing demand for offshore wind turbines which can be safely installed in very deep water locations. They will use one or more types of floating platform to mount the turbine and may need a service life equivalent to offshore oil and gas projects. Both operators and authorities need to know these platforms are safe and will be up to the job. Although this is a new way of generating energy out at sea, it builds on proven technology and experience in offshore energy. These guidelines bring together Bureau Veritas’ experience with and rules for offshore floating units and moorings and marries them with the internationally accepted standards for wind turbines set out in IEC 61400-3: Wind turbines – Design requirements for offshore wind turbines. They will help field developers choose the right system and the right pathway for approval to meet local and international regulations and their own industrial requirements.”Three categories of floating platforms are covered: Ballast floating platforms that achieve stability by using ballast weights placed below a global buoyancy centre; Tension Leg Platforms (TLP), that achieve stability through the use of tendons; and Buoyancy floating platforms, that achieve stability by the use of distributed buoyancy.The top structure with the rotor-nacelle and tower will be certified in accordance with International Standard IEC 61400-3 and/or national regulations. The floating platform on which the generating assembly is mounted will be classified by Bureau Veritas under its Rules for the Classification of Offshore Units (Offshore Rules), which also extend to cover the mooring system.In addition to classification and certification of offshore wind projects, Bureau Veritas is able to provide extensive expertise in site analysis, meteo-ocean studies, hydrodynamic simulation and fatigue life planning and on-site inspection and maintenance.last_img read more

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Epic Games Store will continue to give away free games in 2020

first_imgWhile the launch of the Epic Games Store was rocky, Epic had made it their mission to keep people’s eye on their platform. By giving away a game every single week throughout 2019, they did a great job keeping people happy and that only got better with their excellent sales. Over the Christmas period, Epic did one better and gave a game away for free. Every. Single. Day! We all love free stuff and Epic have announced the “Free Game Per Week” trend will continue throughout 2020.Epic stated “New decade means new games and we’re looking at a great start with tons of amazing titles coming exclusively to the Epic Games Store in 2020. To kick things off, we’re extending our weekly free game program throughout 2020. Every single week, come back to claim your game. Once claimed, it’s yours to keep forever.”The Epic Games Store may be a long way from catching the attention of die-hard Steam fans but Epic seem to be taking it in their stride and hopefully, 2020 will see big changes to the store-front. Epic were happy to throw a bunch of numbers our way.Total number of Epic Games Store customers = 108MTotal number of $ by customers = $680MTotal number of $ spent on third party titles = $251MAmount of $ worth of coupons and discounts honoured = $3.2MAmount of free games given = 73Amount of free games claimed = 200MTotal value of free games = $1,455Average score of free games = 80%Amount of Instagram followers = 2.32MAmount of Twitter followers = 3.14MAmount of Facebook followers = 644KCountries and territories represented by Creators = 235Amount of Creator codes used on third party EGS purchases = 1,733,180The most popular titles on the Epic Games Store were World War Z, Satisfactory, Control, The Outer Worlds, Untitled Goose Game, Borderlands 3, Dauntless, The Division 2 and Metro: Exodus.So what are you waiting for? Head over to the Epic Games Store now!last_img read more

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