Blais delivers State of the Student Union address

first_imgStudent body president Becca Blais gave her State of the Student Union address at student senate’s Wednesday night meeting. Blais talked about the many accomplishments of the Student Union thus far in her term.“Your work in the Student Union has culminated in nearly 100 different policy and programming initiatives, with more to come,” Blais said.Blais cited a few, mentioning changes made during the summer to University Health Services, the introduction of LimeBike, the Flick on the Field event, support for DACA and undocumented students, initiatives related to Notre Dame-South Bend relations and GreeNDot training for both Student Union members and varsity athletes.“Where are we now? Last senate of the semester, 250 days down, 115 to go in this term,” Blais said.Even though only 75 days will remain in her term after winter break, Blais hopes the accomplishments of the Student Union will continue.“It is never too late to try something new and engage in these roles in creative ways,” Blais said. “We will not slow down, we will not keep pace, but we will strive beyond in our service this spring.”Finally, Blais echoed the sentiment with which she began the address.“If people aren’t calling us crazy, then we aren’t doing enough,” Blais said.Tags: Becca Blais, DACA, Flick on the Field, greeNDot, LimeBike, State of the Student Union, student senate, University Health Serviceslast_img read more

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NAHBS 2013: Argonaut Shows Kevlar-Reinforced Prototype SL Road Bike Frame

first_imgWith his original road bike still fairly fresh, Argonaut founder Ben Farver is already working on an superlight version.The SL version has a higher mix of hi-mod carbon fiber with a base layer of Kevlar. Farver said the goal is to drop about 80g from the from the frame without affecting the ride feel.To do this, the first layer wrapped over the mold is Kevlar, which adds a bit of damping since hi-mod carbon is stiffer. It also offers improved impact protection since hi mod is more brittle.The result is that they can build an SL frame to feel just like a regular frame, except lighter.It’s mainly the top and down tubes that get the increased percentage of hi mod fibers. They’ll be test riding it through the summer with a possible release in Fall. It’ll likely carry about a $500 premium. Hit that ‘more’ link for detail shots inside the frame… Those little silver bits are rivet ends that fell through the frame during normal construction. No, they wouldn’t end up in your frame.Want to see how Argonaut’s custom monocoque frames are made? Check out our exclusive inside look at their production process. The Kevlar is the yellow part.last_img read more

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Veteran Broadway Actor Merwin Foard Dies at 59

first_img View Comments Merwin Foard, a multi-talented stage actor who accrued more than a dozen Broadway credits throughout his career, died on March 9 in his home state of North Carolina, according to a close friend. Foard was 59.Foard made his Broadway debut in the ensemble of Show Boat (1983), later taking on roles in Mame (1983), Les Misérables (1987), Beauty and the Beast (1994), Jekyll & Hyde (1997), 1776 (1997), Kiss Me, Kate (1999), Oklahoma! (2002), Assassins (2004), La Cage aux Folles (2004), Sweeney Todd (2005), The Little Mermaid (2008), The Addams Family (2010) and Annie (2012).Foard took Broadway’s Show Boat and Les Misérables on the road, later also touring with a 2015 production of The Sound of Music. In addition, he was seen on the main-stem stage in the 2005 benefit Chidren and Art at the New Amsterdam Theatre.He would return to that main-stem venue years later, from 2014 to 2015 serving as standby to the roles of Jafar and Sultan in Aladdin, which marked his final Broadway credit. Merwin Foard(Photo: Fernando Leon/Getty Images)last_img read more

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Hoff Hall at Castleton attains LEED gold certification

first_imgDEW Construction Corp as announced that its Castleton State College Hoff Hall project received a gold rating certification for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).Hoff Hall includes a 28.8 kW rooftop solar array (120 panels) along with four new rooftop micro-wind turbines, installed after construction. These specific micro-wind turbines are the only wind turbines designed to coexist with solar energy. Wind and solar generation are considered complementary renewable generation sources. Both are connected to the cloud based software system that presents real-time power generation data in the lobby of Hoff Hall ‘ so students can view the energy usage and generation.LEED is the nationally accepted standard and rating system for high performance (green) buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council.ABOUT DEW:DEW Construction Corp. offers commercial development, preconstruction and construction services throughout the Northern New England Region and upstate New York.’  The company is headquartered in Williston, VT with regional offices in Hanover and Keene, NH.last_img read more

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Weekly unemployment claims fall under 500

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Weekly unemployment claims fell again last week after a brief spike, caused by the seasonal reduction in school bus drivers. For the week of June 30, 2018, there were 470 claims, 140 fewer than than they were the previous week, and 143 fewer than they were a year ago. Altogether 3,770 new and continuing claims were filed, a decrease of 35 from a week ago, and 485 fewer than a year ago. For most weeks of 2017 and 2018 claims have been below the year before. For UI claims last week by industry, Services, which typically accounts for most claims, accounted for 51 percent of all claims.Vermont’s unemployment rate for May was 2.8 percent. This is unchanged for the last several months. SEE STORY.On July 1, 2017, the state reduced taxable rates for individual employers according to their experience rating. The rate reduction cut the highest UI tax rate from 8.4 percent to 7.7 percent, and the lowest rate from 1.3 percent to 1.1 percent. Additionally, July 1 marked the sunset of a provision that required claimants to wait one week between the time they were determined eligible for benefits to when they could collect those benefits.Rates will fall again on July 1, 2018 and payments will increase on January 1, 2019, as claims continue to be lower than previous projections. The rate reduction anticipated in July of 2018 will reduce the highest UI tax rate from 7.7. percent to 6.5 percent. The lowest UI tax rate will see a reduction from 1.1 percent to 0.8 percent.The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)last_img read more

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Aqua Lung Group welcomes Matthieu Bazil as CEO

first_img Related Aqua Lung Group, a designer, manufacturer and distributor of dive and watersports equipment for 75 years, has appointed Matthieu Bazil as its new CEO, effective immediately. Hel will be based from the Aqua Lung Group offices in Carros, France.Aqua Lung pioneered the creation of modern diving equipment in 1943. It has since expanded to recreational, swim, technical and military applications in more than 100 countries around the world, under the brand names Aqua Lung, MP Michael Phelps, Aqua Sphere, Apeks, O.ME.R, U.S. Divers, and Stohlquist.Bazil, a watersports enthusiast and scuba diver, arrives at Aqua Lung after roles at Fox Racing, Oxbow, Boardriders (with global leadership roles at both DC Shoes and Quiksilver), and key account management with adidas.“I have worked in the sports industry all my life and have sought out brands that are authentic and credible in their space and leaders in their industry,” Matthieu Bazil said. “Aqua Lung fits this definition perfectly, being the pioneer of scuba diving, and each brand of the portfolio being the most authentic and credible player in their segment.”In addition to the scuba category, the Aqua Lung Group is also heavily invested in the world of swimming, with Aqua Sphere and a longstanding partnership with Michael Phelps around the MP Brand swimming line for competitive swimmers and triathletes.“We will rely most on the strength of our assets, whether it’s the best to ever get in the pool in Michael Phelps, or the first family of the Oceans with Philippe and Ashlan Cousteau – combining these iconic personalities with our incredibly capable internal teams and brands, we will push forward with truly remarkable next-generation products built by our dedicated experts worldwide,” concluded Bazil. “There is much on the horizon for the Aqua Lung Group and it is my honour to be joining this talented team.”www.AquaLung.comwww.michaelphelps.comwww.AquaSphereSwim.comlast_img read more

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Mission explores changes to regulations that could affect long-standing business signage

first_imgPlanning Commissioner Scott Babcock said the Village Inn sign was a good example of why he wanted to be cautious about stepping up regulation of pole signage in the city. Photo via Yelp.By Jerry LaMartinaMission leaders have started to dig into the weeds of what it would take to declutter the city’s business areas from the kinds of imposing signage that have drawn complaints in recent years — but concerns persist about how such changes might affect longtime businesses.At a joint meeting of the City Council and Planning Commission Monday, officials discussed proposed ordinance changes that had been laid out an Oct. 26 work session, focusing on marquee signs, monument signs in the Main Street District 1, window signs, electronic signs, temporary signs, pole signs and costumed characters.During the Planning Commission’s regular meeting Monday, Chairman Mike Lee asked questions about how the behavior of costumed characters could be regulated under the city’s loitering ordinance.“If Mike Lee decides that he wants to dress up as the Statue of Liberty as a Mission resident and (walk) down the street, what would constitute that being loitering?” Lee said.“That’s not my specialty, so I’m not going to try to answer that,” City Planner Danielle Sitzman said. “But you’re not getting paid to do it.”“The concern,” Lee said, “is that (it’s) because I’m advertising a business or I’m a distraction or it’s a safety hazard? … I mean, I don’t like them, but it is sometimes amusing to sit there and watch them.”During the public comments segment of the Planning Commission’s regular meeting, former Mission Mayor Laura McConwell, who spoke as the lawyer representing The Mission Bank’s owner, Valley View Bancshares, said that Valley View had found itself “in a little bit of a pickle” regarding the sign ordinance. The company recently changed the name of its nine banks to Security Bank of Kansas City and has four pole signs at its banks in Mission. The sign ordinance requires removal of a pole sign when a business changes its name.“I do understand that the goal is to work at ultimately phasing out some of the pole signs,” McConwell said. “We have had some pole sign clutter in Mission, and over the years that has been eliminated. …“Nothing about the operation of Mission Bank has changed,” she said. “This sign-maintenance ordinance does not allow them to just reface these existing signs. That’s an impairment to this business that’s been in Mission … longer than I’ve been around, and I’ve been around a long time.”McConwell said that she didn’t think Valley View Bancshares’ change of its banks’ names constituted “(thumbing) their noses at the design ordinance or the community in any way” and asked that the company and others in similar circumstances not be penalized.In the joint work session, Planning Commissioner Scott Babcock cited the iconic Village Inn sign as an example.“That sign’s been there since the mid-‘60s,” Babcock said. “He takes very good care of it. It’s very appropriate for where it’s located. … And it’s part of the city. And it’s a fixture of the city. … Why would we tell him to get rid of this sign? Now, if he leaves, take it down.”Ward 3 Councilwoman Debbie Kring said in the joint work session that the sign ordinance should be written and enforced consistently, and that “the exception has to be based on some set of criteria that could be applied across the board.”Planning Commissioner Frank Bruce said in the joint work session that he thought it was “the responsibility of every single person in this room to do everything we can to support our business community.”“That (sign) is a high-revenue generator for the Village Inn,” Bruce said. “If you want to get your driver’s license renewed, you can drive right by there and not have any idea that the driver’s license bureau is right down there in a hole that you can’t see from Johnson Drive. So, many of those signs are really lifeblood to those people.”The Mission Planning Commission will continue discussion of the proposed ordinance changes at its Feb. 27 meeting.last_img read more

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Briefs

first_img June 15, 2007 Regular News Lisa Marie Macci participated in Law Day 2007 on behalf of the Palm Beach County Bar in Mrs. Aiasha Walker’s class at Village Academy Elementary School in Delray Beach. “We had a great time doing a mock trial of ‘The Big Bad Wolf’ and then had a question-and-answer session about lawyers, the law, judges, and the courts,” Macci said.Landamerica recently sponsored its first Charity Trivia Challenge, which pitted teams from LandAmerica’s law firm agents against each other as well as a team from the company’s Major Transaction Group. Each of the nine teams that competed selected a charity to play for. First prize was a $5,000 donation to the winning team’s charity, second was $3,000, and third was $1,000. The winning team was from Killgore, Pearlman, Stamp, Ornstein and Squires and they selected the Orlando Breakfast Rotary Club Foundation which benefits Orange Center Elementary School. The foundation provides supplies, clothing, mentoring, and gifts to the school’s neediest students. Briefs Lt. Marc J. Soss, a lawyer from Bradenton and a U.S. Navy supply corps reservist, won a SemperComm Award, which is presented each year to active duty personnel serving at remote overseas military bases. The award is given by the SemperComm Foundation, a charitable nonprofit founded to boost the morale of U.S. service members stationed at bases. Soss won the award for his major efforts to boost unit morale while serving in Afghanistan in 2006. Assigned to Camp Clark in Khowst, Afghanistan, Soss was assigned the job of unit morale, welfare, and recreation director, something often thought of as the unit’s “movie night director.” Almost despite this idea, his service went well above arranging a movie night once in a while: Soss secured a 300-plus DVD library. He set up a regular Thursday poker tournament. He made sure birthdays got proper recognition and parties happened for each person. He pulled off delivery of television service several months ahead of schedule so that unit members could watch American television. He put together a unit pool party and barbecue, complete with hotdogs, hamburgers, steaks, and soda — a major feat in the mountains of Afghanistan. Soss pulled together equipment for a 21-person gym, vastly improving on the previous five-person facility. An avid running enthusiast, Soss arranged for secure transportation and lodging for unit members to participate in a marathon nearly an hour away. Soss also created and coordinated two marathons at Camp Clark itself: a Halloween “Boo Run” and a Veteran’s Day Run. To cap off his efforts, he managed a fundraiser for the Landstuhl, Germany, Wounded Warrior day trip program, which helps American military personnel receiving treatment at the hospital occasionally get out of the institutional setting to do something fun. Chief Justice Fred Lewis showed his gratitude for the Florida Board of Bar Examiners at their 2007 staff appreciation luncheon on May 24 in Tallahassee. Lewis referred to the staff as “the most important people among us,” explaining that the Board of Bar Examiners is, in effect, the gatekeeper of law in Florida. “All of us,” he said referring to Florida’s lawyers, “have passed through here.” Chief Justice Lewis, along with Vice Chair Susan Meyer Judas, and Board Member Jeffry Wahlen presented awards for years of staff service. Merit awards were presented by various department directors to Tim Briley, Julie Hannon, Melissa Benn, Ruth Tabanguil, Nijinsky Dix, and Keevia Bennett. The Brandi Cawthon Alvarado Award, presented annually to the employee who best exemplifies the ideals and high standards of the Board of Bar Examiners, was presented to Tara Benton. The Hillsborough County Bar Trial Lawyers Section recently honored several distinguished individuals at its annual Awards Luncheon presentation in May. The State Court Family Award, which recognizes professionalism, went to Donna Oakfield, judicial assistant for Judge Barbara Fleischer. Thomas Roehn of Carlton Fields was honored with the “Michael Fogarty In the Trenches Award for Civil Trial Practice.” Jay Trezevant, with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, was the recipient of the “James Kynes In the Trenches Award for Criminal Trial Practice.” The Herb Goldberg Award was presented to Jack F. Rudy II of Bush Ross. HCBA Trial Lawyers Section Chair Amy Farrior was presented an award by the incoming Chair Ken Turkel. Pictured from the left are Rudy, Trezevant, Roehn, and Oakfield. Describing life as a lawyer as a marathon played out over your adult life and not a sprint, Chief Justice Fred Lewis recently swore in 26 new lawyers at a ceremony at the Supreme Court in Tallahassee. Lewis said lawyers are entrusted with awesome powers, but with that comes tremendous responsibilities. “I hope you look back at this day and remember why it is you wanted to be a lawyer,” Lewis said. “The saddest thing that I see as I travel the state and talk to my contemporaries is so many of them are becoming disenchanted. They want to become something other than lawyers.” Lewis urged the new lawyers not to permit themselves to “become so consumed with who you are, and so consumed with this thing about being a lawyer, that you don’t have balance in your professional life.” He also urged the new lawyers not to permit anyone “to suck the spark out of your life you feel today, the excitement that you have about being a lawyer, being a member of The Florida Bar.” He reminded those in attendance that lawyers are not only officers of the court, but officers of democracy. “After today the judicial system is being placed in your hands,” he said. “You have an awesome responsibility to follow through and protect the system and improve and protect our democracy.” Justice Peggy Quince addressed the Florida A&M University College of Law hooding candidates during the school’s annual ceremony May 5 at the Mayor Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre in Orlando. More than 1,200 family members and guests turned out to celebrate with the law school graduates who earned the Juris Doctor degree from FAMU. Justice Quince was the keynote speaker for the 100 candidates recognized, including 27 honors graduates.center_img Briefslast_img read more

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This fascinating concept could help us better understand why belief in God is so widespread

first_imgShare LinkedIn Share on Twitter Psychology research published in the journal Religion, Brain & Behavior provides new clues as to why some individuals believe in a god while others do not.The two-part study of 316 Americans found that religious “credibility-enhancing displays” (CREDs) were positively linked to the belief in God and religiosity.In the study, the survey assessing “credibility-enhancing displays” included questions such as: “To what extent did your caregiver(s) act fairly to others because their religion taught them so?”, “To what extent did your caregiver(s) live a religiously pure life?” and “To what extent did your caregiver(s) avoid harming others because their religion taught them so?” Emailcenter_img Pinterest Individuals who were exposed to more of these religious CREDs tended to have a higher certainty in the existence of God. Conversely, those exposed less religious CREDs tended to have a higher certainty in the non-existence of God.PsyPost interviewed the study’s corresponding author, Dr. Jonathan Lanman of Queen’s University Belfast. Read his explanation of the research below:PsyPost: Why were you interested in this topic?Lanman: I became interested in explaining who becomes a theist and who becomes a non-theist in 2007 when I noticed a rather odd juxtaposition. On the one hand, the previous decade had seen the rapid development of the cognitive science of religion, a field aiming to explain the existence and persistence of religious belief via cognitive universals.  On the other hand, that same decade had seen a surge in both popular atheist publications (such as Sam Harris’s The End of Faith and Richard Dawkins’s The God Delusion) and the memberships of atheist and humanist groups around the world.If everyone had the universal cognitive mechanisms that drive religious belief, then why would we be seeing such a growth in atheism? I could only suspect that while cognitive universals make religious beliefs possible, they do not deterministically determine beliefs in all individuals and that other factors are necessary to explain who ends up a theist and who doesn’t.I also wasn’t satisfied with the most well-supported theory on offer, the existential security hypothesis, which holds that nations with high levels of personal and social security produce many more nontheists.  The sociological connection seemed correct to me but the psychological assumption that a need for comfort in the face of insecurity explains religious belief struck me as implausible.  Religious ideas in highly insecure places are often far from comforting (think witchcraft beliefs and angry forest spirits).   Meanwhile, it’s in the affluent West where we’ve transitioned to such comforting ideas as New Age fulfillment and hell-less Christianity.  Also, while there’s a lot of evidence for motivated reasoning in psychology, there’s little evidence to suggest that we move from a state of unbelief in some entity to a state of belief simply because it would be comforting if that entity existed.Existential security mattered, I thought, but had to be connected to theism and nontheism in some other way.  I thought that I found that other way when I came across Joe Henrich’s notion of Credibility Enhancing Displays and their role in affecting our beliefs.  If the CREDs hypothesis is correct, then we no longer need the assumption about people the world over coming to believe in supernatural agents because of a need for comfort.  Instead, we can recognize the abundant evidence suggesting that feelings of threat and insecurity increase our commitments to social groups (including religions) and our actions demonstrating such commitments.  In other words, feeling threatened and insecure increases the number and intensity of the religious CREDs people perform, which, in turn, allows for the successful transmission of religious beliefs to new generations.  High levels of existential security mean lower levels of CRED performance and, so I hypothesized, increased secularization.In short, I became interested in CREDs because I saw them as potentially being a crucial causal element in explaining differing rates of secularization around the world.What should the average person take away from your study?I think this is one of those studies where a great many people will say that the conclusion is obvious. We have such sayings as ‘practice what you preach,’ ‘walking the walk,’ and ‘actions speak louder than words’ for good reasons.  I think most people get the idea that matching your words with your actions will make you more persuasive.   This study provides firmer quantitative evidence that this is indeed the case for theistic belief in the United States.What might be new is just how important those actions are in comparison to words.  In our studies, when we put both our measure of general religious socialization (the talking the talk) and our measure of CREDs (the walking the walk) into regression models, the CREDs measure held all of the predictive power.  Actions matter more than words, but the evidence here suggests they matter dramatically more in convincing cultural learners of the existence of God.Are there any major caveats? What questions still need to be addressed?This study was only done in the United States, so we don’t know how widespread the CREDs effect is.  Recently though, Aiyana Willard and Lubomír Cingl have replicated the CREDs effect in Slovakia and the Czech Republic and Hugh Turpin has replicated it in the Republic of Ireland.  That’s still only a small sample of cultural environments, however.Another major caveat is that our studies relied on retrospective self-reports about the actions of one’s parents during one’s upbringing. Such retrospective reports can be affected by a number of other things. To really be justified in making causal claims about CREDs, we’ll need more experimental research.  Initial experiments on CREDs are promising, but we have a ways to go.Is there anything else you would like to add?The claim that exposure to CREDs is a major determining factor of who ends up a theist and who ends up a nontheist is a probabilistic claim, not a deterministic one.  Some people will get exposed to high levels of CREDs and reject theism while others will get minimal exposure and embrace it.   Further, there are certainly other factors that influence who ends up a theist and who doesn’t besides CREDs exposure, such as differences in particular cognitive biases and moral evaluations of specific religious traditions.The study, “Religious actions speak louder than words: exposure to credibility-enhancing displays predicts theism“, was also co-authored by Michael D. Buhrmester. 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