PM Christie rallies Heads of Government to address challenges youth face

first_img Jul 3, 2015 You may be interested in… The Prime Minister of The Bahamas was at the time making remarks at the opening ceremony of the 36th Meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government of CARICOM in Bridgetown, Barbados. The Meeting is being held under the theme Vibrant Societies, Resilient Economies. Chief amongst my concerns and that of The Bahamas is the future of the young people of our Region and our country.  This most recent event pains me greatly precisely because of the threat to 2 500 hundred jobs for young people just taken onto the work force.  They are last in and first out in any crisis,” PM Christie said. He told the gathering at the ceremony that the Region’s youth were” looking to us to help secure their future and dispel their sense of hopelessness. We cannot surrender them to crime and criminality. I repeat we cannot surrender our youth to crime and criminality.  It is our responsibility to ensure that they get a good education, become part of the formal economies of our countries and become beneficiaries of the practice of social mobility, equity and fairness.Additionally, in our teaching methodologies, we must embark on programmes to focus on raising the educational attainment amongst the bottom 50% in the school system, imploring our educators to find progressive and innovative ways to meet the learning needs of every child. The Bahamas Prime Minister warned the audience that if “we fail our youth, we do so at our peril”. As PM Christie handed over the chairmanship of the Community to the Rt. Hon, Freundel Stuart, Prime Minister of Barbados he said: It has been an honour and privilege to serve the Caribbean Community and represent its people in various fora around the world.  As I take my leave, I simply implore us to preserve the momentum gained on various developmental targets and stand in solidarity against any actions that hinder these achievements or negatively impact the territorial sovereignty and integrity of our jurisdictions. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CARICOM Chair advocates for youth development at CARICOM-US Summit[su_pullquote]“Let there be no mistake today. Our mission is as great an opportunity as we can have in our time, to review the important issues of our time. At the core of the mission is that of the development of our people, to make their lives better, free from crime…April 9, 2015In “CARICOM”‘Invest in youth’ – CARICOM Chair at Summit opening[su_pullquote align=”left”] “We have done the research. We have the views of the youth. Let us take the necessary action to deliver on the provision of Paramaribo and ensure that tomorrow’s leaders are academically, socially and mentally ready for building on the policies of yesteryear,” Prime Minister Christie [/su_pullquote]Chairman of the…February 26, 2015In “Antigua & Barbuda”CARICOM places emphasis on sports tourism, cultural industriesCaribbean Community (CARICOM) Heads of Government have decided to place emphasis on developing their cultural and creative industries and sports sectors to boost their economies. The announcement was made at the closing press conference of the two-day 26th Intersessional Meeting of the CARICOM Heads of Government on Friday afternoon by Chairman…February 28, 2015In “Anguilla”Share this on WhatsApp COMMUNIQUÉ Jul 4, 2015 Chair of CARICOM, Prime Minister Perry Christie of The Bahamas (File Photo) [su_pullquote]”…we cannot surrender our youth to crime and criminality. It is our responsibility to ensure that they get a good education, become part of the formal economies of our countries and become beneficiaries of the practice of social mobility, equity and fairness.” PM Perry Christie[/su_pullquote]Outgoing Chairman of the Caribbean Community, the Rt. Honourable Perry G. Christie, on Thursday focused attention on the youth and urged his colleague Heads of Government to ensure the Region’s young people were educated, and were immersed in the formal economies of Member States. He also made a call for more emphasis to be placed on teaching methodologies to meet the learning needs of the bottom 50 per cent of students. Jul 5, 2015 #AskSG876 about role of youth in advancing Single Market Montserrat continues steps towards full implementation of… Jul 1, 2018 Continue to be voices of the vulnerable – UN SG tells… last_img read more

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Well Done Shiv!

first_img Jul 4, 2020 Aug 17, 2020 ‘The Wehby Report’ Distributed to CWI Stakeholders (Windies Cricket Press Release) ST JOHN’S, Antigua – For 21 years he thrilled fans in the West Indies and all over the world. (On), October 25, he received the Honorary Doctor of Laws by the University of the West Indies. We salute Shivnarine Chanderpaul. The 44-year-old is one of the most outstanding batsmen in West Indies history. He is presently one of the CWI Ambassadors for the ICC Women’s World T20 tournament – to be played in the West Indies from November 9 to 24. Jennifer Nero, Director of CWI and Tournament Director of ICC Women’s World T20, paid a special tribute to Chanderpaul. Related Posts Special tribute for The Shadow at UWI graduation(The University of the West Indies Press Release) ST. AUGUSTINE, Trinidad and Tobago. October 23, 2018 – The University of the West Indies (UWI) joins the national community in mourning the passing of Mr. Winston Mc Garland Bailey, The Shadow, one of Trinidad and Tobago’s most prolific singers/ songwriters. Mr.…October 24, 2018In “CARICOM”Chanderpaul retires from cricketST. JOHN’S, Antigua, January 22 – Shivnarine Chanderpaul has officially retired from international cricket almost 22 years after making his debut. The durable left-handed batsman, affectionately known as ‘Tiger’, formally notified the West Indies Cricket Board in an email that he will no longer be available for selection for West…January 22, 2016In “CARICOM”Calypsonian and Cricketer to get UWI DoctoratesCalypso legend Winston Bailey, better known at The Mighty Shadow, will have all reason to “dingolay” this October, as three weeks after he celebrates his 77th birthday, he will be awarded an honorary doctorate from The University of the West Indies’ St Augustine campus. Bailey is one of five people…August 8, 2018In “Culture”Share this on WhatsAppcenter_img “We want to congratulate Shivnarine Chanderpaul on this significant honour by UWI. It is well deserved. He is an outstanding West Indian, a truly remarkable person who rose to become one of the finest cricketers in West Indies history. A student of the game, a wise head, a strong individual, a leader and fine example to the young people of this region,” Nero said. “He has demonstrated by virtue of his commitment and performances that once you are prepared to work hard you will reap reward, respect and global acclaim.” Read more at: Windies Cricket Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CARICOM mourns loss of cricket icon Jul 29, 2020 CDB hails Arthur as Steadfast, Passionate Defender of… last_img read more

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Del Norte Credit Union Celebrates 65th Anniversary!

first_imgBy CAROL A. CLARKLos Alamos Daily Postcaclark@ladailypost.com Del Norte Credit Union (DNCU) is celebrating its 65th Anniversary in Los Alamos. DNCU is a member-owned, not-for-profit financial institution with six locations in Northern New Mexico including Los Alamos, White Rock, Española, Cerrillos Road, DeVargas North and Santa Fe.“Since DNCU is a not for profit financial cooperative with the mission of improving lives it is a great privilege to lead an organization that works toward this higher purpose,” DNCU President/CEO Chuck Valenti said. “Our employees always do the right thing for our member/owners by giving them unbiased financial advice they can trust. We work hard to uplift the communities we serve and the satisfaction from knowing we are making a difference is what I value most.”Valenti spoke about the biggest challenge he faces in his role at the helm of the organization.“One of the biggest challenges is to tell our story so the communities know that we are not just another financial institution. I wish I could share all the stories of when we help people get out of predatory lending situations, buy that first home, or plan for their futures,” he said.Valenti descibed what he believes is DNCU’s greatest asset.“DNCU’s greatest asset is and always will be our employees. Each one of them contribute to our success in various ways,” he said. “The culture we have cultivated at DNCU is rooted deep in our values that we call Del Norteño pride, and that culture lives within each one of our employees. They take great pride in knowing they improve lives every day by what they do.” Valenti addressed the community during this major milestone for DNCU.“The Los Alamos community is celebrating our 65th anniversary with us. Our history began right here back in 1954. We were created by Lab employees as a local financial cooperative that would look out for Los Alamos and Northern New Mexico,” he said. “Our Valero star that you see on our logo was designed to remind us that Del Norte Credit Union was formed for the people of this community and is owned by the people of this community. In return, we value our responsibility as the guiding star that hopes to bring a better future for generations to come.”Valenti also expressed his desire to thank DNCU’s community partners, members, and the DNCU staff on the incredible work that is being done daily to promote the community as a world class destination to live, work, play and stay. “It is an honor to continue to work hard for the people that depend on financial products that make it easy to achieve your dreams. We would like to welcome all of the Los Alamos community to discover our local approach to banking. Buying your first home or car, opening up a savings account for your kids, retirement planning, and everyday banking is what we do, but Improving Lives is what sets us apart. Thank you for trusting us for 65 years—here’s to 65 more!” Valenti said.Back in 1954, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Employees Credit Union began with a mission to bring local financial solutions to Los Alamos, New Mexico.Over the years, the name changed, but the mission remained. Today, DNCU serves more than 51,000 members across New Mexico with the same philosophy of providing financial services with a hometown approach. The idea that sparked a differentiation factor for DNCU, quickly grew to be the culture instilled in every employee to this day.The idea that members of the community own their financial institution and play a crucial role in the development of products, ties in with DNCU’s hometown approach, he said. These factors contribute to DNCU’s position as a leader in customer service, in continued growth, and in recognitions by local and national organizations.Earlier this month, the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce named Del Norte Credit Union, Financial Institution of the Year for the third year in a row. On a national level, Forbes named DNCU as a Best-In-State credit union in 2018. Other recognitions highlight DNCU’s stellar financial condition. In 2019, DepositAccounts.com, the largest and most comprehensive online publication in the U.S. dedicated to banking and deposits product information for consumers, ranked DNCU among the Top 200 Healthiest Credit Unions in America. DNCU made the cut out of more than 5,000 credit unions nationwide.In another mark of DNCU’s sterling financial condition and practices, independent rating firm Bauer Financial Inc. has now graded the credit union 5 stars or Superior for 57 quarters running – 15 years of consistent excellence (as of March 2019).For DNCU, it is not about the recognition, but about the attention to their member’s lives. The DNCU team, comprised of 169 local individuals, continually attend training and learn better ways to serve the community with the help of DNCU’s leaders. With ambitions to continue its community involvement with the introduction of DNCU LOV Foundation, DNCU remains true to its promise of Improving Lives for years to come.To date, non-profit organizations like the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, Kiwanis Club of Santa Fe, Big Brothers Big Sisters Mountain Region, The Food Depot, Kitchen Angels, Esperanza Shelter, The Family Y, and countless other hardworking organizations have benefitted from DNCU’s commitment to the youth of Northern New Mexico. DNCU President/CEO Chuck Valenti at the 65th anniversary community-wide celebration Thursday at the Los Alamos Branch at 1000 Trinity Dr. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.comlast_img read more

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Local GOP Meets At UNM-Los Alamos Sept. 5

first_imgGOP News: The community is invited to hear a County Council update, 6-6:30 p.m. by Los Alamos County Councilor Katrina Schmidt (DTS). All registered Republicans are invited to stay, 6:40-7:30 p.m. for a Central Committee business meeting. A light supper will be served. The Republican Party of Los Alamos announces this month’s meeting is Sept. 5 in Jeannette Wallace Hall, Building 5 at UNM-Los Alamos. Direct questions to leadership@losalamosgop.com.last_img

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New Mexico Land Office Seeks Advisory Committee Members

first_imgLand Commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard announces an open application process to serve on advisory committees or working groups. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com NMSLO News:SANTA FE — New Mexico State Land Office and Commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard announced Tuesday an open application process for New Mexicans interested in serving on advisory committees or working groups aimed to steward access to state trust land while helping the State Land Office fulfill their mission to raise revenue for public schools, hospitals, and universities. Applicants with expertise in agriculture, conservation, and hunting and sportspeople access are encouraged to apply. Link: Online Application“In 2019, we had trusted experts on a number of committees helping us steer rule changes and decisions,” Commissioner Garcia Richard said. “I personally thank everyone for their participation and the time that they devoted to these important causes. Moving forward, it is important to open up this process to more people, more perspectives, and more leaders from our state. These committees provided valuable feedback about the way we do business, and there is much more ahead in our collaborative efforts with those we do business with on behalf of our beneficiaries. I encourage all who are interested to apply.”Applications for the following committees and working groups are being accepted online through April 15, 2020:Advisory Committees:Agriculture – The Agriculture Advisory Committee provides expertise and feedback on a range of issues directly impacting agricultural lessees. The committee is comprised of agricultural lessees, ranchers, farmers, and industry-related organizations. The committee will meet in person in Santa Fe in April and September, and will be asked to be on-call to respond to emerging issues as they arise.Sportspeople – The Sportspeople Advisory Committee provide expertise and insight into hunting and other outdoor recreation activities that take place on New Mexico State Trust Land. This committee is mainly on-call to address issues that arise such as hunting closures and access issues, but it will have at least one in-person meeting in Santa Fe every September.Conservation – The Conservation Advisory Committee provides insight to the State Land Office to ensure conservation and improvement of our public lands. This committee takes on engagement and action. Members are asked to help raise environmental awareness, educate the public, and help coordinate their respective communities in support of the State Land Office’s stewardship efforts and long-term landscape level planning. This committee is primarily on-call, but it will have at least one in-person meeting in Santa Fe every November.Working Groups:Department of Game and Fish Easement – Every March, the State Land Office and the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish enter into an easement agreement to open up nearly 9 million acres of state trust land to hunters. This working group is comprised of agricultural lessees and sportspeople. The goal is to find compromises that both stakeholder groups can agree to in order to improve the experience of hunters and agricultural lessees during hunting season.Agricultural Leasing – The State Land Office is fortunate to have over 3,500 agricultural lessees that provide stewardship and safety throughout state trust land. This working group is comprised of agricultural lessees, and it will help the State Land Office make critical decisions regarding any changes to agricultural lease terms.Camping and Backpacking – The State Land Office in partnership with the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish will establish the first-ever pilot program on state trust land to allow for backpacking and dispersed camping in 2020. This working group is comprised of sportspeople and outdoor recreational experts who will advise on the pilot program.White Peak – For generations, families have used White Peak for camping and hunting, but access continues to be threatened. The State Land Office is committed to addressing these issues and finding solutions through this working group.last_img read more

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Governor Issues Rules For Vehicle Sales During Pandemic

first_imgGov. Michelle Lujan GrishamSTATE News:Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has authorized automobile sales by small dealers on an appointment basis utilizing strict social distancing practices during the COVID-19 Stay at Home Order.Additionally, online/Internet sales by all licensed New Mexico motor vehicle dealers are allowed.“This is great news for New Mexicans,” said Marc Powell, CEO of the New Mexico Independent Automobile Dealers Association. “New Mexico’s transportation system is built around the automobile. There are more than 1,000 small independent car dealers in every city and town in New Mexico. And the majority of cars bought and sold in New Mexico are by these small dealers.”The new rules:The customer and licensed automobile dealer must communicate about the vehicle over Internet, phone or text;No more than one appointment at the dealership at a time, with no more than two clients at each appointment;All parties must follow strict 10-foot social distancing;At the agreed time the dealer alone will greet clients. Clients may not enter the dealership alone or come into contact with any other dealership employees;Vehicles must be thoroughly disinfected before and after any test drive;Each appointment allows for test drives of two vehicles; andAll paperwork including closing will take place outside, with clients either in a vehicle or outside.“It’s virtually impossible to buy a car that costs $10,000 or less without a test drive due to the age and condition of the vehicles,” Powell said. “Many people aren’t aware that the average New Mexico vehicle is almost 14 years old – meaning many are due to be replaced. Additionally, private vehicles are needed for essential workers, especially first responders whose vehicles may have been stolen, totaled in an accident or cannot be repaired.“All New Mexico dealers applaud Gov. Lujan Grisham’s rapid action to protect New Mexico from the worst effects of this pandemic. We support all efforts to limit the spread while also serving our communities with safe, reliable transportation options,” Powell said.last_img read more

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Snyder: Ashley Pond – Importance Of A Small Body Of Water

first_imgLos Alamos Ranch School boys circle Ashley Pond as they leave for a pack trip in the Jemez Mountains. Courtesy/Los Alamos Historical Society ArchiveBy SHARON SNYDERLos Alamos Historical SocietyWhen Peggy Pond Church first saw the site where her father would one day open a school for boys, she was 12 years old. She remembered it in later years as “not much more than a homesteader’s farmhouse, a few sheds, and a muddy puddle of water.”That mud puddle would one day become a centerpiece for Los Alamos. What were the events in the life of Ashley Pond, the small body of water?The first mention of the shallow depression that would become Ashley Pond dates to the homesteading era, which began on the Pajarito Plateau in the 1880s. Water was scarce for the homesteaders, who learned dryland farming techniques. They depended on rain water and snowmelt and often hauled water from sources miles away. When rains came, the depression would collect water, and homesteaders nearby would bring their livestock to the temporary pond, a depression that became known as the Stock Watering Tank.In 1917, Ashley Pond Jr. established his Los Alamos Ranch School and eventually bought the homestead lands that surrounded the Watering Tank. As the school grew in enrollment, so did the need for a more adequate supply of water. The solution was to build a small dam in Los Alamos Canyon to create a reservoir. A 6-inch pipe brought water from the reservoir to the school to be stored in a wooden water tank near the Big House.With the more reliable supply of water, Ranch School Director A.J. Connell had another plan for the Watering Tank, by then known as the Duck Pond. The ranch school had built a reputation for outdoor activities as well as its curriculum. Enlarging the pond would increase the possibilities for outdoor pursuits such as fishing, canoeing, swimming, and, in the winter, ice skating. Connell acquired the pond and several acres of land around it and eventually sold it to the school. The pond was dredged to make it deeper, and the water level was maintained by piping surplus water from the school’s water supply. In addition to the new activities for the boys, some of the water in the pond could be piped to the school’s lower fields for irrigation of crops. The reservoir and pond projects were turning points in the school’s history and success.The name Duck Pond must have seemed too common for one of the faculty members at the school. Master William Mills, known for his love of puns, offered up the name Ashley Pond in honor of the school’s founder. Of course, that would have created the tongue tangler Ashley Pond Pond, but someone with better sense discouraged the use of the second “Pond” and the shortened name became a popular choice.In early 1943, when the school was taken over for the Manhattan Project, the pond took on a new role. The Technical Area, known as TA 1, was built around the south side of Ashley Pond. The water was a safeguard in case of fire in the wooden buildings that comprised much of the wartime laboratory.Another connection to the pond was the stone ice house, built on the south side of the pond by the ranch school to store blocks of ice cut from the pond. In 1945, the ice house was used for assembling the nuclear components of the Trinity device.In recent years, the pond was once again dredged and improvements made, including new walkways, landscaping, and a covered concert stage. The pond has been a significant part of our history for more than a century, so the next time you’re strolling around Ashley Pond to admire baby ducks or turtles basking in the sun or the lovely flowers in the surrounding park, remember that you’re experiencing history! Ranch School masters and boys construct the dam in Los Alamos Canyon that created a reservoir to supply water to the school. Courtesy/Los Alamos Historical Society Archivelast_img read more

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