Former No. 1 Ana Ivanovic retires from tennis at 29

first_imgIn this video, taken from a livestream feed on her Facebook page on Dec. 28, 2016, Ana Ivanonic announces her retirement.Updated: 5:12 a.m., Dec. 29, 2016LONDON (AP) — Ana Ivanovic retired from tennis at age 29 Wednesday, ending a career in which she was ranked No. 1 in 2008 but can no longer play at the highest level because of injuries.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next EDITORS’ PICK A finalist at Roland Garros in 2007 and the Australian Open in 2008, Ivanovic lost in the first round of this year’s US Open to 89th-ranked Denisa Allertova of the Czech Republic. It was her second consecutive exit in the first round at Flushing Meadows.Ivanovic announced a week later she would take the rest of the season off because of wrist and toe injuries, saying she had a recurring wrist injury and would also have surgery on a toe she broke at the Australian Open in January 2015.“Ana is a true champion and a great ambassador for the sport of women’s tennis,” WTA CEO Steve Simon said in a statement on the tour’s website. “She has contributed greatly to the entire sport, both in her home country of Serbia and across the globe.”ADVERTISEMENT Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH In a live broadcast on Facebook, Ivanovic said “it was a difficult decision, but there is so much to celebrate.” The Serb won 15 tour titles, including the 2008 French Open, and is now ranked No. 63.“It’s been well-known that I’ve been hampered by injuries. … I can only play if I can perform up to my own high standards and I can no longer do that,” she said. “So it’s time to move on.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliIvanovic became a UNICEF national ambassador for Serbia in 2007 and says that position will figure in her plans.“I will become an ambassador of sport and healthy life. I will also explore opportunities in business, beauty and fashion among other endeavors,” she said on her Facebook page. “I will also have more time for my philanthropic activities with my work with UNICEF. I’ve lived my dreams and I really hope to help others do so as well.” Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Senators to proceed with review of VFA PH among economies most vulnerable to virus As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercisecenter_img We are young Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes View comments Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Inquirer 7: Volleyball’s best Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportslast_img read more

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The 10 most intriguing forest stories of 2018

first_imgForest issues are probably Mongabay’s most regular kind of news coverage.Here’s what our forests editors chose as the most intriguing stories of the past year, from Bangladesh to Brazil.Leave your own top forests stories of the past year in the comments section. Throughout 2018, forests continued to be threatened and destroyed. From the Amazon, to the Congo Basin, to the Mekong Delta and scores of places in between – journalists reporting for Mongabay filed hundreds of stories about the world’s forests.Although the significance of any one story is difficult to gauge in the short-term, several Mongabay reports from 2018 stood out. These pieces dealt with illegal timber trafficking, advances in technology-based environmental protections, and human rights protections for the people doing environment-defense work – formal and informal.The last trees of the AmazonLogged trucks in the Amazon. Photo by Mongabay.A team of journalists from five Latin American countries investigated how groups of timber traffickers manage to steal and process timber from the Amazon. Illegally-sourced timber from Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, and Colombia are incorporated into the international market with falsified official documents that are almost never verified. Timber traffickers are now pursuing new species of trees, but the countries’ governments do very little to protect the species. Reported by Nelly Luna Amancio of Ojopublico and translated by Sarah Engel for Mongabay Latam.Environmental reporting in Vietnam often a comedy of errorsThe main chamber of Hang En, the third-largest cave in the world, located in Phong Nha-Ka Bang National Park. Photo by Michael Tatarski/Mongabay.Vietnam’s global press freedom ranking is one of the lowest in the world. Reporters Without Borders ranks Vietnam 175 of 180 in its 2017 annual press freedom index. Environmental journalists in Vietnam, including citizen journalists and bloggers covering forests or pollution issues, routinely face roadblocks and sometimes jail time. Reported by Michael Tatarski in Vietnam.Land restoration in Ethiopia makes progressStudents of the church live in small huts around the church’s land. Photo by Maheder Haileselassie Tadese for Mongabay.In Meket – a district in Ethiopia’s Amhara National Regional State (ANRS) – efforts are underway to restore what experts say is one of the more severely deforested and degraded regions in the country. Of the land in ANRS, less than 2 percent forested land remains, and efforts are underway to restore degraded and deforested areas. In 2016, Ethiopia turned to forestry sector development projects in the form of short rotation planting and rehabilitation of degraded lands in ANRS and other districts. Reported and photographed by Maheder Haileselassie Tadese in Ethiopia.How land is stolen in ColombiaMany areas have been used to grow large crops. Photo courtesy of the Solidarity Development Corporation (CDS).Mongabay learned that the Superintendent of Notary and Registry has a record of empty lands being used illegally in seven Colombian departments. The illegally-used land is in the departments of Norte de Santander, Antioquia, Meta, Caquetá, Casanare, Cesar, and Vichada. The land makes up a total of 762,807 hectares (almost 1,885,000 acres). Reported by Maria Fernanda Lizcano and translated by Sarah Engel.Bangladeshi forests stripped bare as Rohingya refugees battle to surviveA Rohingya boy chopping wood from tree stump he freed from soil near Kutupalong-Balukhali refugee camp on Bangladesh. Photo by Khaamil Ahmed/Mongabay.Their panicked dash from burning villages involved stumbling through forests or battling monsoon-charged waters in search of safety. Along the way and in makeshift shelters and eventually camps, refugees needed a massive supply of firewood and shelter for survival. The rapid decimation of the forest is also possibly contaminating groundwater supplies. Reported and photographed by Kaamil Ahmed on the Bangladesh-Myanmar border.In Brazil, an island laboratory for Atlantic Forest restorationA rufous-collared sparrow in Anchieta. Photo by Ignacio Amigo/Mongabay.Anchieta Island, just off the coast of Brazil near São Paulo, has seen the worst side of humans. Now, scientists and local authorities are laboring to restore its biodiversity. The island is located 800 meters (about 874 yards) from the municipality of Ubatuba, in one of the few regions of Brazil where the Atlantic Forest still thrives. Most of the island’s original forest was devastated over a long period of human habitation, and more recent attempts to introduce foreign mammal species have also had a significant ecological impact. Scientists are now studying the complex interactions at play during environmental restoration, including removing some invasive species, as they embark on an intensive reforestation program. Reported and photographed by Ignacio Amigo in Brazil.Trase.earth tracks commodities, links supply chains to deforestation riskCerrado soy feeds a booming global soy protein market. The Trase 2018 Yearbook tracks the Brazilian soy supply chain in detail, from producers to export. Image by Flávia MilhoranceLaunched in 2016, Trase is an innovative Internet tool, available to anyone, which tracks commodities supply chains in detail from source to market, and can also connect those chains to environmental harm, including deforestation. Until the advent of Trase, knowledge of supply chains was sketchy and difficult to obtain. The Trase Yearbook 2018 is the first in an annual series of reports on countries and companies trading in such commodities as soy, sugarcane and maize, which also assesses the deforestation risk associated with those crops, making it a vital tool for environmentalists, governments, investors and other interested parties. The Yearbook shows that in 2016 the Brazilian soy supply chain was dominated by just six key players – Bunge, Cargill, ADM, COFCO, Louis Dreyfus and Amaggi – accounting for 57 percent of soy exported. In the past ten years, these six firms were also associated with more than 65 percent of the total deforestation in Brazil. Trase shows that zero-deforestation commitments (ZDCs) have so far not resulted in greatly reduced deforestation risk for the commodities companies and countries making them. Between 2006 and 2016, soy traders with ZDCs, as compared to non-committed firms, were associated with similar levels of deforestation risk. Written by Claire Asher.Fire, more than logging, drives Amazon forest degradation, study findsThe Amazon arc of deforestation stretches across the southern and eastern edges of the forest and is rapidly expanding into the forest’s core. Data in Global Forest Watch from Hansen et al (2013) and Brazil’s National Institute of Space Research (INPE) PRODES project.Forest degradation has historically been overlooked in accounting and monitoring carbon stocks. A recent study combined ground-based inventory, satellite and LiDAR data to record the loss of carbon due to forest degradation in areas exposed to logging, fire damage, or both, in the arc of deforestation of the southeastern Amazon. The study revealed that fire damage causes greater losses than logging, and fire-damaged forests recovered more slowly than logged forests. Accurate depictions of both deforestation and degradation are necessary to establish emissions baselines used to inform programs to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). Written by David Klinges.Seeing REDD: A database of forest carbon emission reduction projectsA woman in Senegal farms short-cycle cowpeas instead of millet due to poor seasonal rains, which are expected to become more frequent as climate changes. REDD+ aims to reduce emissions from forest loss. Image by Thierry Brévault, copyright CIRAD.A searchable database of 467 forest carbon emissions reduction (REDD+) initiatives in 57 countries is now available through the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). The ID-RECCO database gathers in one free online tool over 100 different categories of information – including project partners, activities, and funding sources – on these subnational projects aimed at conserving forests, promoting local economies, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and degradation. The tool makes these data and their sources accessible to anyone, with minimal interpretation: while it does not summarize project results, it provides goals, activities, and links to project websites for the reader to learn more. Written by Sue Palminteri.India’s new forest policy draft draws criticism for emphasis on industrial timberThe new draft forest policy may not be beneficial for members of forest-dependent communities, such as this Malayali tribesman from Kolli Hills in Tamil Nadu. Photo by S. Gopikrishna Warrier / Mongabay.India’s Draft National Forest Policy 2018 is now open for public comment, and will replace the older 1988 policy once it comes into force. Critics are apprehensive about how the draft policy deals with community participation and industrial forestry. The current draft is bereft of knowledge-driven solutions, some experts say. Written by S. Gopikrishna Warrier. Conservation, Forests, Rainforests Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Inside an ambitious project to rewild trafficked bonobos in the Congo Basin

first_imgA decade ago, a troop of formerly captive bonobos was for the first time reintroduced to the wild in the Democratic Republic of Congo.Following that successful reintroduction, a new troop of 14 bonobos is now in the process of being released and is anticipated to be fully in the wild by September.Congolese conservation group Amis des Bonobos du Congo (ABC) is working to make sure the communities surrounding the release site feel invested in the project. BASANKUSU, Democratic Republic of Congo — On a sultry morning in the densely forested Équateur province, Victor Likofata and Ibrahim Walelo perch on the edge of a long dugout canoe as it slows down along the Lopori River.Their eyes fix on the verdant trees that line the riverbank, where a troop of bonobos (Pan paniscus), an endangered great ape endemic to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), calls excitedly in response to the sound of the boat’s approaching engine. The high-pitched shrieks reverberate across the surface of the water.Likofata and Walelo both work for a local bonobo rehabilitation project called Amis des Bonobos du Congo (ABC), which in June 2009 made an unprecedented move to reintroduce 11 trafficked and orphaned bonobos, as well as two of their captive-born offspring, from the organization’s sanctuary in Kinshasa into a wild release site that encompasses an expansive swath of Equateur’s riparian forest. The troop’s number has since swelled to 18, thanks to five wild births, the most recent of which occurred just a few weeks ago.“It was the first time this kind of thing had ever been attempted with bonobos, so there wasn’t a well-worn path for us to follow,” recalls Likofata of the early stages of the reintroduction process, as the boat idles about 20 meters (66 feet) away from the pioneering troop. “But if you look at their behavior now, you wouldn’t believe these were bonobos that had ever been kept in captivity.”Sometimes known as “pygmy chimpanzees,” bonobos weren’t recognized as a separate species until 1929. Like chimpanzees, they share 98.7 percent of their DNA with humans.But in contrast to their close relative, bonobo society is female-centered and egalitarian. Bonobos also tend to be less prone to violence than chimpanzees, preferring to maintain relationships and settle conflicts through sex.The formation of the Congo River 1.5 million to 2 million years ago likely first separated bonobos’ ancestors from chimpanzees and led to their distinct speciation. However, the remoteness of bonobos’ habitat and decades of civil unrest in the DRC have ensured that much remains unknown about the species.As a result, ABC’s first reintroduction effort was an inevitably speculative affair. But the results have been encouraging enough that in July 2018 the organization began the complex, protracted process of reintroducing a second troop of 14 bonobos into the approximately 475 square kilometers (183 square miles) that comprise the steadily expanding release site, known as Ekolo ya Bonobo, meaning “Land of the Bonobos” in Lingala, the lingua franca in much of the DRC.The new troop is currently being kept in quarantine on an island next to the main reserve, from where it has increasingly been exchanging calls with its antecedents across the water, most of whom are old acquaintances from the sanctuary in Kinshasa.According to Walelo, in charge of monitoring the new troop’s progress, they will be fully released into the main section of the reserve before September this year. “They’re already hunting for their own food in the forest. They’ve dealt with heavy rains and flooding. They’ve adapted very well,” he says. “In my estimation, they’re ready now.”last_img read more

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