World Cup ThirdPlace Match Crib Notes Brazil vs Netherlands

It isn’t nearly as important or anticipated as the final, but Saturday’s third-place match is good enough to be a World Cup final. It pits pre-tournament favorite Brazil against the Netherlands, which put up one of the two most impressive performances of the World Cup in routing defending champion Spain, 5-1, in the group stage.Brazil vs. the Netherlands, 4 p.m. EDTIN BRIEFSee our World Cup predictions for the latest probabilities.IN DEPTHThe other most impressive World Cup performance was Germany’s 7-1 semifinal rout of Brazil, which is the reason the hosts have to play in this warmup act. Although the score was embarrassing, the outcome — a shot at third place —  wasn’t so bad. Brazil lost to one of the best teams in the world and improved on its quarterfinal exits in the past two Cups. Spain, which flamed out (like some other defending champions), had a far worse tournament. By reaching the semifinal stage, Brazil guaranteed fans two more matches featuring its national team. And other World Cup hosts have played in the third-place match, most recently Germany in 2006 and South Korea in 2002.In the Netherlands, Brazil has a worthy opponent. The Dutch have played in more finals than any other side to never win the Cup, a streak that will continue after their Wednesday loss to Argentina on penalty kicks. Now they can set their sights on a more modest goal: finishing third for the first time in their World Cup history.OK, so the stakes are low and the match is being belittled as a “pointless sideshow” or “meaningless exercise.” But a match between these two teams doesn’t need high stakes to be watchable.Without star striker Neymar and captain Thiago Silva, Brazil wasn’t as good in the semifinal as its top ranking in ESPN’s Soccer Power Index suggested. But it was nowhere near as bad as it looked against Germany. Now Brazil will have Silva back to help shore up its battered defense and to rally supporters behind his teammates.The Netherlands, meanwhile, is coming off an embarrassing performance of a different sort. At least Brazil scored against Germany, while getting off 18 other attempts in 90 minutes. The Dutch, though, took just seven shots in 120 minutes against Argentina in their seminal match, and just one forced a save.The silver lining of a low-stakes match is that neither team should feel pressure to play safe. If these two offenses — still rated two of the four best in the world by SPI — decide to attack, that should make for a great show, even if it is of the pointless-sideshow variety.OFF THE PITCHThe Brazilians and the Dutch both had heartbreaking losses this week, but at least they can go to each other for consolation. The countries’ relationship is strong, dating to the days of the Dutch West India Company. Back then, when the extent of contact was months-long journeys by sea, trade was the only real connection. But times have changed, and travel between the two nations now consists of a 12-hour plane ride, meaning more opportunity to visit for pleasure. So how many Dutch and Brazilian citizens take advantage of this?According to the Netherlands Board of Tourism and Conventions, about 102,000 Brazilians visited the land of tulips in 2011, and Brazil’s Ministry of Tourism reports that 72,162 Dutch traveled the opposite direction in the same year. When adjusted for each country’s total population, those travelers make up just 0.4 percent of Dutch citizens and .05 percent of Brazilians. Travel may be easier than it was in the 17th century, but it looks like 12 hours may still be a bit much to endure. — Hayley MunguiaFURTHER READINGCould the World Cup Champion Beat the Best Club Team in the World?U.S. vs. Belgium Was the Best Match of the World Cup So FarMessi Is Better Than Maradona, But Maybe Not PeleHow Does Germany’s Blowout of Brazil Compare to Those in Other Sports? read more

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Bryce Harper May Already Be Past His Prime

From ABC News: The Philadelphia Phillies and star outfielder Bryce Harper on Thursday reached a record free-agent agreement in terms of total dollars ($330 million) and years (13). After waiting 123 days since the World Series ended, Harper breaks the mark set just days earlier by Manny Machado. The previous open-market record — Alex Rodriguez’s free-agent contract for $275 million deal with the Yankees on Dec. 13, 2007 — stood for 11 years until this winter.1Before Thursday, Giancarlo Stanton had set the record for the richest deal signed, a $325 million extension with the Miami Marlins in 2014.But Harper’s deal falls short in terms of annual average value ($25.4 million). For instance, Rodriguez’s mega deals signed in 2007 and 2001 each had greater average values, and offseason speculation expected that Harper might command more than $30 million per season.2After all, one win above replacement is valued at about $10 million. There is no opt-out clause in the deal, but there is a no-trade clause. Given the deal’s less-than-expected annual average value and Harper’s far-longer-than-expected wait on the open market, the contract suggests that the baseball industry didn’t quite know what to make of Bryce Harper.The good news for the Phillies is that Harper should help them immediately. Based on 100 simulations run for FiveThirtyEight by Out of the Park Developments, Harper will improve the Phillies from an 80.2-win team in 2019 to an 86.1-win team, though the computer forecasts still had Philadelphia missing the postseason. Harper caps an aggressive offseason for the Phillies, who traded for catcher J.T. Realmuto and shortstop Jean Segura and added notable free agents Andrew McCutchen and David Robertson to a young core led by ace pitcher Aaron Nola and slugger Rhys Hoskins.But what’s troubling for the Phillies, who are now committed to Harper through his age 38 season in 2031, is that there’s a good chance that Harper has already played his best baseball.Harper was on the cover of Sports Illustrated in 2009 at age 16, dubbed the “most exciting prodigy since LeBron.” A year later, he was the No. 1 overall pick in the draft. He debuted as a 19-year-old in 2012 and won rookie of the year. In 2015, he posted a season of 10 wins above replacement and was named as the National League MVP. Since he reached the majors in 2012, he’s 20th in position player WAR, and he owns a .900 OPS (on-base plus slugging). In many ways, he’s lived up to the hype.But seven seasons into his career, we’re not exactly sure what type of player Harper is. While he’s shown stretches of brilliance, volatility in performance has been his most consistent trait.This has led to an unusual career trajectory to date.He’s one of only 15 position players 25 and younger to own a 10-WAR season, according to Baseball-Reference.com. The rare company includes Ted Williams, Mike Trout, Willie Mays, Lou Gehrig and Cal Ripken Jr. But he’s had just the one elite-level season.3We consider a season “elite” when a player has at least 8.0 WAR. His other campaigns have had a range of outcomes, from 1.1 to 5.1 WAR. Even within seasons, he’s had dramatic peaks and valleys. Last year, for instance, he hit .214 with an .833 OPS in the first half but was a star in the second half when he hit .300 with a .972 OPS. Injuries have played a role in this. Harper has played fewer than 120 games in three of his seven years in the majors, and those partial seasons have also limited his ability to rack up WAR, which is a cumulative stat that rewards just showing up for work.FiveThirtyEight examined all players in MLB history who have had one season of 8 or more WAR — but only one — before turning 26, and then we studied the trajectory of those players’ careers. There are 32 such players in MLB history, including three other than Harper who are still active: Aaron Judge, Matt Chapman (who hasn’t played his age 26 season) and Evan Longoria. Of the 28 players who are no longer active, 17 never produced another 8-plus WAR season after their age 25 season.The historical players studied peaked at age 24 (6.6 WAR) and 25 (6.5 WAR), then they declined steadily. A player’s peak is often earlier than conventional wisdom would expect. Jeff Zimmerman at FanGraphs found that while the average ballplayer peaks at age 27, good players peak at either 25 or 26 years old.While there are exceptions like Adrian Beltre and Henry Aaron, who had some of their best years later in their careers, the best baseball happens early for many excellent players. That doesn’t mean that Harper (or Machado, for that matter) can’t be a star-level player regularly, but history is betting against him becoming a consistent MVP presence like Mike Trout. Baseball may not quite know what Bryce Harper is, but the Phillies are going to find out.Neil Paine contributed research. read more

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Sponseller ends Ohio State career with AllAmerican honors

Colt Sponseller found a small silver lining after the senior from Glenmont, Ohio, finished his college wrestling career at Ohio State. Sponseller was named an All-American wrestler as he finished fourth in the nation at the 2011 NCAA championships at 165 pounds. Although he earned All-American honors, Sponseller said his season did not end the way he wanted as his fourth-place finish fell short of his high expectations. “I didn’t go there and do what I wanted to do,” he said. “I lost my final college match, and I’m never happy when I lose.” Sponseller’s finish in the NCAA Tournament was the first time he has placed in his three years at the NCAA championships. He lost in the semifinals to the eventual national champion Jordan Burroughs from Nebraska, and in the third-place match to Wisconsin’s Andrew Howe. “I finally got over the hump,” he said of earning his All-American honors. Sponseller finished this season with a 25-7 record and a 105-24 record throughout his career. He said although the All-American honors make him feel good, he is not satisfied with his career because he was not able to earn a national championship. “I’d probably say that, overall, it didn’t really go the way I wanted it to,” he said. “But it ended on a somewhat good note.” Coach Tom Ryan said the team expected Sponseller to be an All-American and a national champion, but he was only able to achieve the former. “People like Colt come to college with very high expectations,” Ryan said. “They’re highly motivated people, and to do well is critical.” Ryan said although Sponseller did not win a national championship, he was always a hard worker and his losses were not for a lack of effort. Sponseller’s wrestling eligibility has run out, but Ryan said he is bringing the senior back to help the coaching staff. “He’s finishing his degree in business,” Ryan said. “His major is marketing, and he will be in the role as student-coach.” Sponseller said he still has two quarters to finish and that he will try to help the younger wrestlers succeed on the mat with his strong work ethic. “He represents everything that OSU wrestling wants to represent,” Ryan said. “He is just a great leader.” Besides Sponseller’s All-American honors, he was named to the academic All-Big Ten list this year and is a two-time OSU Scholar Athlete. He was the runner-up in the Big Ten Championships in 2010 and 2011, losing to Howe both seasons. Sponseller’s mom, Sue, has a distinct whistle that she uses at every match to help her son while he is wrestling. “I have kind of a deep voice,” she said, “so whistling was always easier to get them to react.” Sue uses different types of whistles to encourage her son to work harder or get moving. “I can do all kinds of whistles,” she said. “I can almost break glass.” Sue said she was very proud of her son for not only his wrestling success but his success in the classroom as well. She said his All-American honors were a welcome announcement for the Sponseller family. “When that match was over, we were just so happy and relieved,” she said. “It just seemed that every year there was something standing in the way.” Ryan said the team will miss Sponseller’s hard work ethic and leadership once he leaves OSU. “It’s been a pleasure coaching him,” Ryan said. “I’m very grateful he chose to be a Buckeye.” read more

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Commentary Browns may have new management but its the same old losing

It’s too soon to completely write off the current Cleveland Browns upper management team – president Mike Holmgren and general manager Tom Heckert aren’t even halfway through their second season running the team. That doesn’t mean it’s too early to be skeptical. Seemingly every time a new front office regime is in place, they remind us of the missteps of the past. The franchise has been dreadfully misguided ever since the late Al Lerner helped move the old Browns to Baltimore and flipped his minority share in that team so he could buy a majority stake in the new Browns. Then he hired former San Francisco 49ers executives Carmen Policy and Dwight Clark. With those two, the Browns had the foundation in place … to tarnish the reputations of Jim Brown, Otto Graham or any historically great Browns player. Policy’s legacy with the Browns is his response to fans hurling beer bottles at officials in 2001 – “I like the fact that the fans care.” Clark is remembered for being the worst GM in Browns history – and that includes George Kokinis, who lasted only 10 months. Head coach Butch Davis briefly revived the franchise by leading them to the playoffs in 2002. The honeymoon was over for Davis once he was given greater control of the football operations – and then ran the team into the ground. Randy Lerner – who assumed control of the franchise after his father died in 2002 – then dipped into the front office of the division’s elite by hiring Phil Savage away from the Ravens in 2005. A year in, the general manager Savage and team president John Collins got into a power struggle, forcing Collins out of town. After dismissing Savage in 2008 – the team was 24-40 under him – Randy Lerner completely disregarded common sense by hiring coach Eric Mangini before finding a general manager. That turned out to be Kokinis, essentially a puppet under Mangini’s control. Holmgren – now the face of the front office – took the Peyton Hillis contract negotiations public by going on “Mike and Mike In The Morning” and declared how desperate the team was to keep Hillis. That would be fine if the front office got the extension done in a timely fashion. Unfortunately, it continues to be a distraction to the team. Hillis didn’t play against the Miami Dolphins due to the severity of his strep throat. Not everyone is buying that. Some think it’s a protest for not getting a new deal done. Perhaps that’s warranted if the organization is holding Hillis back and purposefully limiting his role in the offensive game plan – another conspiracy theory. Regardless, rookie coach Pat Shurmur is now the whipping boy for the media, as he struggles to clarify what is going on in a very public ordeal. At one point, I was naïve enough to think the latest regime change would create some stability. It’s starting to feel like nothing has changed, which makes being a Browns fan more of a chore than anything. read more

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Ohio State prepares to go allin against Dayton in 2nd round of

Senior guard Aaron Craft (4) looks towards the basket for a layup during a game against Nebraska in the Big Ten Tournament March 14. OSU won, 71-67.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorThis one means a little more.This one — and all the rest from here on out — could be the swan song for two of a program’s most tenured and successful players.This one is the mentor against the pupil. The 14-year head coaching veteran against the young, up-and-coming fireball looking to continue making a name for himself.This is old teammates now sitting on opposing benches after wearing the same colors for two seasons.This is an in-state battle, a major conference against a mid-major adversary.This is Ohio State and Dayton.The No. 6-seed Buckeyes (25-9, 12-9) and No. 11-seed Flyers (23-10, 11-7) are set to battle to take another step forward toward the ultimate goal of winning the 2014 National Championship, Thursday at 12:15 p.m. in Buffalo, N.Y. The second game of the South region (Albany defeated Mount St. Mary’s, 71-64, in the First Round Tuesday), the game is the official kickoff for the second round of the tournament.“For us, and for Dayton, you win or you go home,” OSU coach Thad Matta said Wednesday. “There’s not a whole lot more than that.”Matta is slated to face off against one of his old assistants in Archie Miller, who spent two years in Columbus before jumping to Arizona with his older brother Sean and ultimately landing the head coaching job at Dayton.“That’s Columbus, and that’s where they are. It’s a powerful, powerful place. I was very fortunate to spend a couple of years there and feel that and understand it,” Miller said Wednesday. “But at the same time, a place like ours has its own special tradition, has a great program, an unbelievable fan base. In my opinion, the best fan base in the state of Ohio for basketball.”The similarities between Miller’s Flyers and Matta’s Buckeyes lie in the groundwork each set prior to tournament time this season. Both squads dropped five games in January, each peppered with four-game losing streaks within. Both have four players averaging at least eight points a game, and use substitution rotations of nine players. Each team won three games on a neutral floor this season, much like the one they are scheduled to play on at the First Niagara Center.Dayton redshirt-junior guard Jordan Sibert left OSU following the 2011-12 season to get more playing time, and now leads the team in scoring. Two of Sibert’s former teammates, senior guards Aaron Craft and Lenzelle Smith Jr., have played in a combined 22 NCAA Tournament games. That’s compared to a combined four games of NCAA Tournament experience for the entirety of Dayton’s roster — two games for Sibert his freshman year at OSU, and two for redshirt-senior guard Vee Sanford, one in both his freshman and sophomore years at Georgetown.Being a senior with tournament experience helps a lot, Craft said.“Just knowing what the routine is, being able to know when you have to concentrate and get things done,” Craft said Wednesday. “Lenzelle and I have been here for four years now. Just because we’ve had a little bit of success before doesn’t necessarily mean we’ll have success now, but I think it helps us prepare ourselves mentally for what the NCAA Tournament means and what it’s about.”The last meeting between the two schools was also a postseason affair, albeit in the 2008 NIT. OSU won that game, 74-63, in Columbus, before any member of either team was in college.Smith Jr. said his tournament experience is going to help him personally come tipoff Thursday.“I’ve seen everything,” Smith Jr. said Wednesday. “I’ve been on both sides of the spectrum from winning tough games to losing tough games. I just think it helps me mentally prepare better and know what to expect, especially when you get into the tournament.”The game between OSU and Dayton is set to be Miller’s first in the NCAA Tournament at the helm of a program. Going up against another member of his extensive coaching tree in such a situation doesn’t seem to mean much to Matta, however.“I honestly won’t even know he’s down there. It’s the game, it’s what’s going on there,” Matta said. “Before the game, you shake hands. After the game, you shake hands. But in between there, I don’t know what he’s doing or anything like that.”Experienced or not, power conference or mid-major — it all goes by the wayside come tipoff.“The experience isn’t going to put the ball in the basket for us this year,” Craft said. “It’s a balance of understanding it’s a new year and it’s a new team, and it’s a new experience that you’ve got to try to make the most of.” read more

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Womens Soccer Ohio State concludes regular season with 21 win over No

Ohio State freshman forward Emaly Vatne (14) heads the ball down the field in the game against Florida Gulf Coast University on Sept. 7. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorAfter capturing a 2-1 win over Purdue on Thursday night, the Ohio State women’s soccer team clinched a 2-1 victory in its final match of the 2018 regular season against No. 19 Wisconsin on Sunday.This win for the Buckeyes to finish off the 2018 regular season results with a 9-5-3 record, 6-2-3 in the Big Ten record while the Badgers drop to 12-3-3, and 6-2-3 in the conference. Ohio State got off to a speedy start at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium with sophomore forward Marissa Birzon notching a goal from six yards, assisted by senior forward Eleanor Gabriel, to lead Wisconsin 1-0 early. Birzon said that this win was major for the team for the team’s final regular season game.  “I think we came out really strong in the first half,” Birzon said. “And that carried all the way through the game.”The Badgers weren’t out of the game yet. A quick response came from Wisconsin junior forward Dani Rhodes, who made a shot from eight yards in the 18th minute of the match assisted by senior midfielder Victoria Pickett, knotting the game at 1-1. Then, an unexpected goal came in the 29th minute of the match.   Buckeye senior midfielder Sarah Roberts played a cross through the box, but a Wisconsin defender was there to deflect and the ball. The ball went into its own net instead, extending the lead to 2-1 for the Buckeyes on the Badgers’ own goal.In the first 45 minutes of the match, Ohio State secured a 4-3 advantage in shots, while Wisconsin held a 3-1 edge in corner kicks over the Buckeyes. The best opportunity for the Badgers to tie the game up once again came in the 57th minute, when sophomore forward Lauren Rice attempted a left-footed strike from the top of the box, but was then cleared away by Buckeye senior goalkeeper Devon Kerr. After several attempted shots by each team at its opponents’ net, the Buckeyes were able to hold the lead for the rest of the game. Senior forward Eleanor Gabriel said today’s victory over the Badgers was a collective team effort. “I know we’ve had some struggles during the season,” Gabriel said. “We’ve had a lot of adversity thrown our way, so I think this is a good quality win against a top opponent and I think we all came together today.”In the final 45 minutes of the match, Wisconsin came away with a 13-6 lead in shots and an 8-2 lead in corner kicks. Meanwhile, Ohio State managed to tally four total saves over the Badgers’ two, with Kerr making three of the four saves for the Buckeyes. Gabriel said coming out on top today felt great, especially being a senior player on the team.  “I know the days here are limited,” Gabriel said. “So I think that everybody rallied together and winning our last regular season home game was a big win for us.”After finishing their regular season, the Ohio State women’s soccer team will prepare for the Big Ten tournament. The tournament starts on Oct. 28. read more

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M20 reopens hours later than planned after bridge collapse sparks traffic chaos

first_imgA motorway has completely reopened more than 24 hours after a footbridge collapsed, sparking hours of traffic chaos on one of the busiest weekends of the year.Traffic can now use the westbound carriageway of the M20 in Kent, Highways England said, after a stretch between junctions one and four was cleared following Saturday’s accident, which saw the structure stuck by a digger being transported on the back of a lorry.The reopening was several hours later than planned and Highways England said the eastbound carriageway of the motorway, which leads to the Channel Tunnel and the Port of Dover, remained closed following the incident close to where it meets the M26. Scene of the bridge collapse on the M20 in Kent Stuart Thompson, a Highways England spokesman, said: “We have worked overnight and removed part of the structure on the London-bound carriageway.”We had hoped to reopen by lunchtime. Having done some of these assessments we needed to do more safety work before we reopen it. We will look to get it open again as soon as possible.”We are look at this evening, hopefully earlier, although we are reluctant to put a time on it.”It is a very, very complex situation. There are lots of different things needed to be done and we needed to be confident it is safe before we reopen it.” Scene of the bridge collapse on the M20 in KentCredit:Henry Bodkin for The Telegraph Andy Sunnucks, 24, who also saw the incident, said: “We were about 15 cars back on the same carriageway as the collision.”It looked like a lorry had jackknifed, and I could see half the bridge was missing. We went to have a look and the back end of the lorry was in pieces.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Alex Magaisa was driving past the lorry involved just as the bridge collapsed, with his wife and two young sons in the car.They were on their way to Gatwick Airport to catch a flight to Belfast to see family for the bank holiday weekend.The University of Kent lecturer, 41, said: “My instinct was just to drive through. My wife saw the bridge falling and there was a big noise. I had to manoeuvre through the debris.”We stopped afterwards for about 30 minutes, and there was another car with a family behind us. Luckily no-one seemed to have been hurt.”It was a big shock. It’s only just starting to sink in now what might have happened. We were right in the line of fire and we could have been crushed.” Thousands of motorists were caught up in delays after the collapseCredit:Kalpana Fitzpatrick The bridge came down between junctions three and four shortly after noon on Saturday when a digger being transported on the back of a lorry collided with it.A motorcyclist in his 50s was taken to hospital in Tunbridge Wells with suspected broken ribs following the incident while the driver of the lorry was treated for shock at the scene.A temporary 50mph speed limit has been put in place in both directions past the bridge.  The graphic designer, a passenger travelling from Maidstone to Sevenoaks, said: “The motorcyclist was laying down underneath his bike.”An estimated 13 million drivers are expected to take to the road for a holiday or an outing between Friday and Monday, according to the AA.Saturday was expected to be the busiest single day for motorists embarking on leisure journeys, with 10 million drivers predicted to be getting behind the wheel. M20 bridge collapselast_img read more

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English Heritage accused of pinching celebrities after blue plaque book cover features

first_imgEnglish Heritage has been accused of “pinching” celebrities from other parts of the country after a book to honour those who have been awarded a blue plaque featured five people who were not born in the capital on its cover.The newly-released Lives and Homes of London’s Most Interesting Inhabitants features a cartoon of Mahatma Gandhi, John Lennon, Amy Johnson, Winston Churchill and Sylvia Pankhurst standing among the capital’s most famous monuments on the front. Yesterday, residents in Liverpool and Hull criticised English Heritage and said its decision to use five people who were not born in London was “disappointing and insulting”.    The newly-released Lives and Homes of London's Most Interesting Inhabitants features a cartoon of Mahatma Gandhi, John Lennon, Amy Johnson, Winston Churchill and Sylvia Pankhurst standing among the capital's most famous monuments on the front Diana Johnson, the MP for Hull North, said it was “disappointing and insulting” that English Heritage “had failed to recognise Amy’s true Hull heritage”.She added: “It is bad enough that Amy’s gypsy moth airplane Jason is displayed in London rather than Hull, but it adds insult to injury to paint Hull entirely out of Amy Johnson’s life. Amy Johnson was many things but a Londoner was not one of them.”Rick Welton, who is setting up a charitable trust in Hull to celebrate Ms Johnson’s legacy, said: “It seems a little far-fetched to describe her as Londoner though I can understand London wanting to make the most of our Hull heritage.”English Heritage said the blue plaque scheme, which it took over the running of in 1986, was designed to celebrate not just those born in London but also notable figures who have lived or worked in the capital. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. They pointed out that Pankhurst came from Manchester, Johnson was born and bred in Hull while Lennon’s Merseyside roots were celebrated in some of the The Beatles’ most famous songs.Churchill, meanwhile, was born in Oxfordshire while Gandhi lived in Hammersmith and Fulham for less than three years while a law student.Dave Gannon, who runs the Lennon Bar near Liverpool’s legendary Cabin Club, said the decision was “ridiculous” as he claimed: “I never thought London was short of celebrities so I don’t know why they need to pinch one of ours.”center_img I never thought London was short of celebrities so I don’t know why they need to pinch one of ours.Dave Gannon It is one of the oldest schemes in the world, with more than 900 plaques issued in the last 150 years. In order for a plaque to be approved, 20 years must have passed since a candidate’s death and the building within Greater London must survive in a recognisable form.In Lennon’s case, a plaque was issued at 34 Montagu Square in 2010 as it was the first home the musician had shared with Yoko Ono. It was also the flat when the naked photograph of the couple was taken for the Two Virgins album cover.Meanwhile, a plaque was awarded to Johnson – who was the first female pilot to fly solo from England to Australia – as she had spent several years living in London, where she learnt to fly. She also departed on her record-breaking journey from Croydon.A spokesman for English Heritage added: “The London Blue Plaques Scheme celebrates not just people who were born in London but Londoners in a wider sense (defining Londoner as ‘a native or inhabitant of London’).”All of those featuring on the front cover have lived in London. No official complaints have been made about the £16.99 book, which will act as a portable guide for the scheme. The newly-released Lives and Homes of London’s Most Interesting Inhabitants features a cartoon of Mahatma Gandhi, John Lennon, Amy Johnson, Winston Churchill and Sylvia Pankhurst standing among the capital’s most famous monuments on the frontCredit:English Heritagelast_img read more

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Victims of cyberbullies are picked on at school first researchers find

first_imgBullyingUK said calls relating to cyberbullying rose by 77 per cent last year.ChildLine reported an 88 per cent increase in calls related to cyberbullying in the past five years. The research was published in the journal European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Prof Dieter Wolke, of the department of psychology at the University of Warwick, said: “Many media reports have portrayed that cyberbullying is an epidemic, suggesting many new victims are created. Our findings show that very few new victims are created.”The same bullies that confront their victims in school and know them face to face also now use cyber tools to bully their victims and extend their reach to outside school. The same bullies that confront their victims in school and know them face to face also now use cyber tools to bully their victimsProf Dieter Wolke “However, being directly victimised and relationally excluded are still the main forms of bullying.” They also wanted to find out if online abuse was worse psychologically for victims than traditional playground bullying.Although nearly one in three of the children said they had been bullied, just one per cent were only bullied online, the study found. Cyberbullying was found to lower self-esteem and increase depression as seriously as traditional bullying.When youngsters were bullied by multiple means, such as being beaten, socially excluded, or victimised online, the psychological impact was worse. Being able to target victims online allowed the reach of bullies to extend into their homes. Cyberbullying has largely affected children who were already being picked on rather than creating new victims, according to researchers.In recent years, helplines for children have reported huge increases in the number of online victims, who are often abused and taunted through social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook.But a study found that 99 per cent of children would have been bullied regardless of new technology, as the internet merely gave bullies another outlet to torment victims.Academics at the University of Warwick questioned 2,700 pupils aged between 11 and 16 from secondary schools in Britain, to determine whether cyberbullying finds new victims. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Countryfile presenter says BBC should give show more money for drones due

first_imgWe will be out filming something and there are times you can’t afford a couple of hundred quid for a drone, and you think that would really advance the piece.Tom Heap The budget is tight, very tight, for such a popular programme.Tom Heap Countryfile presenter Tom Heap has said that he would like the BBC to give the show more money as its budget is “very tight for such a popular programme” and it has sometimes been impossible to find “a couple of hundred quid for a drone”.Heap said he is confident the rural affairs show, which has beaten The X Factor in ratings battles, has a future, but thinks it needs to move with the times. Asked if that has an impact on the show and their ability to do what they want, he replied: “Yes it does.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He told the Press Association: “There is no reason it can’t go on, I would say it needs to evolve to survive.”I don’t think revolutionary change is what it’s about, but I think staying alert to changes that are going on in society and the countryside, both in the audience we are broadcasting to and those that we are filming [is important]. But I don’t see why it can’t continue.”We have a very good slot and as long as the lords of the BBC keep us there that will help, and as long as they don’t cut the budget to the bone as well.”The budget is tight, very tight, for such a popular programme.”center_img He continued: “We would like to do bigger investigations and the budget makes that difficult, in terms of people time and camera time.”If we are a journalistic outfit, we are called the investigations unit, sometimes a little bit more room on that would be very handy.”And when you are one of the BBC’s premium brands, that occasionally would feel a little bit constricting.” (Pictured L- R) Countryfile presenters Anita Rani, Ellie Harrison, John Craven, Adam Henson, Matt Baker and Tom HeapCredit:Caroline Lott – countryfile@hous Heap said this sometimes impacts upon “smaller things”, adding: “We will be out filming something and there are times you can’t afford a couple of hundred quid for a drone, and you think that would really advance the piece.”I wouldn’t be able to put my finger on individual issues, but some things maybe require undercovers, time to follow things, where you can’t just turn up and film on schedule, and those could be things we struggle to do.”I’m sure all BBC programmes say they want more budget, we are not unique in that, but I do feel we are constrained.”I don’t know the figures, but per audience member we must be one of the cheapest programmes on the BBC.” (Pictured L- R) Countryfile presenters Anita Rani, Ellie Harrison, John Craven, Adam Henson, Matt Baker and Tom Heaplast_img read more

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