Asda pulls out of £75m east London market revamp…

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People Moves: JLL, Shawbrook, Fisher German and more

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Sir Geoffrey Bindman joins Iran protest

first_imgHigh-profile human rights solicitor Sir Geoffrey Bindman spoke in support of democracy at a protest against the Iranian government last week, organised by the People’s Mojahedin Organisation of Iran. Bindman said: ‘Change is coming in the Middle East, and that would include the liberation of Iran. ‘Great courage is required. It is a very crucial period.’ The sit-in outside the Iranian embassy began on 20 February and has also been addressed by Malcolm Fowler, member of the Law Society’s International Human Rights Committee.last_img read more

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Hansom

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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Cosco ferries to Brazil

first_imgThe ferry, named Itacoatiara, was built at the Afai Southern Shipyard and weighs a total of 474 tonnes, with the dimensions 78.4 m x 14.8 m x 13.8 m.This will be the third ferry that Cosco has transported to Brazil for use in the Rio 2016 games.  www.coscol.com.cnlast_img

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World rail infrastructure market May 2014

first_imgAustralia: Aurecon and Parsons Brinckerhoff are to undertake design work for the 12 km South East Light Rail project in Sydney. Brazil: CCR Metrô Bahia has selected Thales to install Seltrac CBTC on Salvador metro lines 1 and 2. Czech Republic: AŽD Praha has begun a KC1·28bn modernisation of the 98 km eské Budjovice – Nové Údolí route to raise speeds from 50 km/h to 75 km/h. Finland: Liikennevirasto has awarded Mipro a €5·8m contract for renewal of the train control system on around 1400 track-km in western Finland. A TAKO traffic management system is to be rolled out in eight phases during 2014-18, replacing the Taika system used in the Tampere region. India: Mott MacDonald is to undertake design work on the second phase of the Bangalore metro, including the 16 km Purple Line extension to Whitefield and 6·3 km Green Line extension to Anjanapura Township, due for completion in 2017. Lithuania: AŽD Praha has won a KC43m contract to modernise signalling between Kaunas and Kazl Rda. Norway: Torpol Norge has been awarded contracts totalling NKr35m for tram track modernisation in Oslo. Poland: PKP PLK has awarded Porr a 26·4m złoty contract to modernise the Chojna – Krzywin Gryfiski section of the Szczecin – Zielona Góra line. PKP PLK has awarded a consortium of Rubau Polska, Construcciones Rubau and Rover Alcisa a 177m złoty contract for modernisation of the 28 km Rybnik – Chaupki line. Singapore: GE has won a S$159m contract to supply CBTC and platform screen doors for the Thomson and Eastern Region lines, and Singapore Technologies Electronics is to supply telecoms under a S$124m contract.Daewoo E&C has a S$352m contract for civil works for 3·2 km of the Thomson Line including one station. Slovakia: Working with Siemens and Kapsch CarrierCom, AŽD Praha has a €45m contract to install ETCS Level 2 on the 37 km route from the Czech border to Žilina, and GSM-R on this section and to Bratislava. Spain: ADIF Alta Velocidad has awarded Alstom, Bombardier European Investments and Indra Sistemas a €410·4m to supply signalling, train control and telecoms including GSM-R, for the Valladolid – León and Venta de Baños – Burgos high speed lines now under construction. The 20-year maintenance element of the contract is worth €228·8m. A joint venture of Amurrio Ferrocarril y Equipos, Felguera Melt, Jez Sistemas Ferroviarios and Talleres Alegría has been awarded a €56m contract to supply dual-gauge pointwork for the Mediterranean Corridor project. Prefabricados y Contratas, Drace Infraestructuras, GIC Fabricas and Traviesas del Norte are to supply 273608 sleepers for the Valencia – Vandellòs and Vilaseca – Castellbisbal sections under a separate contract worth €36·4m. Under a €65·7m contract, Siemens Rail Automation and Thales España GRP are to supply and maintain signalling, train control and telecoms for 51 km of new alignment between La Robla and Pola de Lena including the Pajares base tunnel. ADIF has awarded Iberovías and Coalvi a 48-month €61·2m contract to maintain track and infrastructure on sections of the high speed line between Lleida and the French border. Thales España has won a 48-month €28·6m contract to maintain traffic control systems on the Madrid – Valladolid high speed line and its branch from Olmedo to Medina del Campo. Turkey: TCDD has awarded Thales a €10m contract to modernise signalling at Eskiehir station, including the deployment of ETCS Level 1. UK: Network Rail has awarded Parsons Brinckerhoff a system integration contract for the Great Western Route Modernisation Programme. USA: As part of the East Side Access fit-out, New York MTA has appointed Frontier-Kemper Constructors to install concrete lining in the new tunnels north of Grand Central Terminal and rehabilitate the 63rd Street tunnel at a cost of $294m.last_img read more

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Alia Atkinson is the new Brand Ambassador for major company

first_imgA look at some of the top stories making the news today, May 3rd, across your Caribbean-American community in South Florida.To improve security in the region, the Caribbean Institute for Security and Public Safety has signed a memorandum with Miami Dade School of Justice to establish more joint training programs for police forces. Miami Dade College has already hosted 3 training sessions in Trinidad & Tobago with over 100 participants from the twin island republic, Guyana and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.Senator Braynon (the second) will host his 4th annual Choice Challenge empowerment event on May 7th from 9 a.m to 3:30 p.m. This is a free youth only event aimed to aid middle and high school students with the tools to make positive and conscious decisions about their future and to promote the safety of our youth.Roman Catholic priest Clyde Reginald Hezekiah, also called “Father Reggie”, was laid to rest today. Hezekiah died of a heart attack on April 21 in Fort Lauderdale, one day before he was scheduled to return to Port of Spain and resume leadership of the Tunapuna parish in Trinidad & Tobago Father Reggie was 82 years old.In Sports, The Caribbean Premier League final and semi-final games could now be hosted in Trinidad and Tobago despite earlier reports that Guyana had secured the event. Reports from the twin island republic suggest that a late bid has prompted the organizers to hold off on making the final decision.What trending:Olympic swimmer, Alia Atkinson, is the new brand ambassador for Rainforest Seafood. The Pines native and Team Jamaica Olympian is glad for the chance to work with another great Jamaican company and the attention she will bring to the sport this year in Rio.For Today’s Weather Forecast:Scattered thunderstorms in Broward County with a high of 91 and a low of 74. For Miami-Dade, scattered storms as well with a high of 88 and a low of 75.For more information on these and other stories, visit caribbeannationalweekly.com. Remember to pick up this week’s copy of our Caribbean National Weekly at your nearest Caribbean outlet.last_img read more

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Jamaica’s healthcare system in dire need of help

first_imgJamaicans in the Diaspora seems to be perennially concerned about the reported violent crime rate in Jamaica. While this may seem justified, it is ironic when one visits Jamaica one finds the general public going about their business, enjoying life, as if there’s really “no problem” on the island.However, there’s a problem in Jamaica that is just as concerning as the reported crime rate. This problem relates to Jamaica’s healthcare system. Healthcare in Jamaica is one area that’s not keeping up with the strides the nation have accomplished since independence in 1962. Health minister working tirelesslyThe incumbent Minister of Health, Dr. Christopher Tufton, is working tirelessly to remedy the situation, but he and the government needs help, badly and quickly.In rural Jamaica people travel long distances, often meeting transportation challenges, to see a medical professional. It isn’t unusual that the delay experienced in getting quick and urgent medical treatment results in death.Just last week Dr. Tufton in a TV interview indicated the government is taking steps to upgrade the facilities at some rural clinics and hospitals. This is commendable, but because of cost challenges the upgrades will be limited. Moreover, new clinics are urgently needed in several rural parishes. Medical facilities have outgrown its efficiencyThe real problem with Jamaica’s healthcare isn’t a lack of competent doctors, nurses and other medical professionals. The main problem is the existing medical infrastructure has outgrown its efficiency to the expanding and aging population.The demand for healthcare, especially at public health facilities, have far outgrown the ability of these facilities to provide the required services. At the root of the problem of the inefficiencies of the public health facilities is cost. Expansion of existing hospitals and clinics across the island is mega-expensive; not to mention the cost of building new facilities. Patient must purchase her own hospitals supplies An example of Jamaica’s health challenges is seen in the experience of a woman in Kingston. The woman injured her shoulder while working on her domestic job in St. Andrew. She needs surgery to repair torn ligaments in the shoulder. The surgery is estimated to cost J$240,000. Her employer has offered to help with the cost, However, this woman was also informed by the hospital in Kingston that she needs to take in medical supplies to the hospital related to the surgery. She received a statement from the hospital indicating the supplies will cost another $201,000 dollars. Now she is in a plight. She cannot work with the injured shoulder. Her employers are unable to help meet the extra cost for the supplies. She cannot find the funds elsewhere. So, what does she do?This situation is experienced repeatedly in Jamaica,In another recent example, a well-known Jamaican was hospitalized in the ICU unit of another Kingston hospital with a life -threatening infection. His family was told he need an urgent antibiotic to treat the infection, but the family was required to purchase this antibiotic at an external pharmacy for approximately J$200,000.Fortunately, this family could afford to purchase the medication. If they could not, the family member would most likely have died from his infection.center_img Calling on the DiasporaThe National Weekly calls on the Diaspora to utilize its available, relevant resources to meet Jamaica’s healthcare challenges. More than short-term medical missions are needed. Jamaica’s healthcare need sustained approach from the Diaspora to alleviate the problems. Periodical medical teams not enoughEvery year, medical teams from the Diaspora visit Jamaica bringing temporary care to patients across the island. This is also commendable, but when the medical team leaves the health problems reappears. The medicines these health team distributes can only last so long. Then the patients have challenges getting medication.Jamaica’s healthcare challenges send an urgent call to the Diaspora for a structured, organized approach to assist in this critical matter. The rural areas need more health clinics; existing facilities needs more health equipment and medical supplies. Existing facilities also need structural repairs. The list seems nonending. This a huge task for the Diaspora. It’s a task that with effective leadership, and coordination can be accomplished. The government is in dire need of help to alleviate the pressures on the healthcare system.Almost every Jamaican in the Diaspora have a relative living in Jamaica. The challenges of the healthcare system will affect these relatives in some way.last_img read more

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Thousands demonstrate in Libya against Turkish president Erdogan

first_imgErdogan: Turkish army has losses in Libya Thousands demonstrated in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on Sunday against what they claim is Turkish interference in the country’s domestic affairs. /AP Thousands demonstrated in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on Sunday against what they claim is Turkish interference in the country’s domestic affairs.Thousands demonstrated in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on Sunday against what they claim is Turkish interference in the country’s domestic affairs. /APTurkey has sent mercenaries and weapons to the country’s internationally recognized government in Tripoli.The protesters carried banners bearing pictures and slogans attacking Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Libyan ally Fayez al-Sarraj, prime minister of the U.N.-backed government.“We are against the Turkish conquest, and against the Government of National Accord in Tripoli, and, God willing, we will be victorious, thanks to the vigor of our youth, may God preserve them and protect them,” said a protester, Mona Al-Farsi.They also carried signs in support of the east-based Libyan Arab Armed Forces (LAAF) and its leadership.Libya has been in turmoil since 2011, when a civil war toppled long-time dictator Moammar Gadhafi, who was later killed.The country has been divided between two rival governments since 2015 – one in the east, allied with Gen. Khalifa Hafter, and the U.N.-supported government in Tripoli.Hafter’s forces are backed by the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Russia, while the Tripoli-allied militias are aided by Qatar, Italy and Turkey.Many of these foreign backers are apparently jockeying for influence in order to control Libya’s oil resources, the largest in Africa.(With input from AP)Related Turkish President Erdogan says they won’t be silent over mercenaries in Libyacenter_img Turkish President Erdogan to attend BRICS Summitlast_img read more

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Seat Belts Must Now be Provided on Dedicated School Transport in Scotland

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInSeat Belts on School Transport (Scotland) Act 2017 in force on 1 August 2018Seat belts must now be provided on dedicated school transport in Scotland following introduction of the Seat Belts on School Transport (Scotland) Act 2017.The Act comes into effect on 1 August which should mean every child has access to a seat belt when travelling to and from school for the start of the 2018/2019 school year.National guidance and awareness-raising materials have been published online and sent to school authorities and other interested parties with information on seat belt fitting, wearing and monitoring.It’s now hoped schools and local authorities will use the guidance as an opportunity to look at what approaches have worked for encouraging pupils to wear seat belts. A recent YoungScot survey highlighted peer pressure was one of the reasons they weren’t worn on school transport.Transport Minister Humza Yousaf said:“The Scottish Government is committed to achieving safer road travel which is why we’re urging pupils to wear a seat belt where one is provided on school transport.“When the Seat Belts Act for dedicated school transport in Scotland comes into force, it will make sure every child and young person who requires a seat belt will have one as they travel to and from school.“While the Act won’t affect the law on the wearing of seat belts, which is a reserved matter, the Scottish Government has always been clear the Act represents an opportunity to promote successful approaches into seat belt wearing and wider awareness of this issue.”last_img read more

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