Himalayan Cataract Project semi-finalist for $100 million grant

first_imgHimalayan Cataract Project photo.Vermont Business Magazine The Himalayan Cataract Project, based in Waterbury, is one of eight groups named as semi-finalists in 100&Change, a global competition for a single $100 million grant from the John D and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation. In June 2016, the MacArthur Foundation(link is external) launched the competition(link is external), offering a $100 million grant to fund a single project which makes measurable progress towards solving a significant global problem. The winner will be announced later this year.Avoidable blindness persists despite known, cost-effective solutions, with 90% of the world’s blind living in low income countries. In fact, 18 million people are completely blind due to cataracts – a condition permanently curable with an inexpensive, 10-minute surgery.The Himalayan Cataract Project has worked since 1995 to develop sustainable solutions for needless blindness throughout Asia and Africa. The organization first developed its systems in Nepal where the prevalence of blindness has fallen by two-thirds since the early 1990s. HCP’s solution scales sustainable delivery systems in three countries where the bulk of its resources are currently focused – Nepal, Ethiopia and Ghana. Collaborating with leaders in global eye care and medical technology, HCP focuses on capacity building and local empowerment while supporting high quality, high volume service in the poorest parts of a country. HCP will expand the models to include innovative, refractive programs that address uncorrected vision while also providing sustainable revenue generation. Most importantly, HCP and its partners will unlock the blueprint for sustainable eye care delivery worldwide, in a manner that can be shared, replicated and scaled. “The 100&Change grant could enable the Himalayan Cataract Project to reach the tipping point to eliminate needless blindness on a global scale.  A grant of $100 million could generate billions in leveraged investment,” says Dr. Geoffrey Tabin, the Co-Founder of the Himalayan Cataract Project.The economic empowerment generated by eye care development has been shown again and again. A recent PricewaterhouseCoopers-led study demonstrated a 400% return on every dollar invested in eye care programs in the developing world. Other studies estimate that $47 billion is lost in productivity every year due to blindness – and predominantly by the economies that can afford it the least. “Selection as a 100&Change semi-finalist is a major endorsement of the eye care model that we have developed and implemented with partners over the last two decades.  With an investment of this magnitude, we can scale up faster, expand our training, infrastructure and innovation, and cure over 500,000 blind people,” says HCP Chief Executive Officer, Job Heintz.Source: WATERBURY, Vt., Feb. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Himalayan Cataract ProjectWebsite: http://CureBlindness.org(link is external) Facebook: http://facebook.com/cureblindness(link is external) Twitter: http://twitter.com/cureblindness(link is external)last_img read more

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August 15, 2006 On the Move

first_img August 15, 2006 On the Move August 15, 2006 On the Move On the Move Robert A. Reynolds has joined the Merlin Law Group’s Davie office. Reynolds will represent insurance policyholders in the areas of insurance claim presentation and litigation, insurance claim disputes, and insurance bad faith litigation. A. Courtney Cox joined CCS Medical in Clearwater as assistant corporate counsel. Jenay E. Iurato joined the Tampa office of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick as an associate in the litigation practice group. Daniel W. Courtney opened Daniel W. Courtney, P.A., at 799 Brickell Plaza, Ste. 606, Miami 33131. The telephone number is (305) 579-0008. Richard “Rick” Hutchison, a commercial and construction litigation partner in Holland & Knight’s West Palm Beach office was appointed to the Judicial Nominating Commission for the 15th Judicial Circuit by Gov. Jeb Bush. Anthony J. Diaz joined Checchio and Stone as of counsel in its Orlando office concentrating in the areas of criminal defense, family law, civil law, and mediation. Ninowtzka Mier joined Robinson & Pecaro as an associate where she will assist with insurance defense. Douglas Kniskern joined Arnstein & Lehr’s Ft. Lauderdale office as a partner, working in the firm’s estate planning and trusts and estates administration practice groups. Theodore J. “T.J.” Heinemann joined Fox, Wackeen, Dungey. Heinemann concentrates his practice in the areas of estate, gifts and generation-skipping transfer tax planning, charitable giving, asset protection planning, choice-of-entity planning, formation and transactions, tax planning for real property transactions, and probate and trust administration. Tonya Walker joined Sachs Sax Klein as an associate who practices in the areas of family law, commercial litigation, and appeals. Scott A. Frank joined Arnstein & Lehr’s West Palm Beach and Boca Raton offices as a partner. Frank practices real estate law, representing clients with acquisitions and dispositions, development, financing, land use, and condominium law. Julie F. Klahr was named shareholder at Goren, Cherof, Doody & Ezrol. Her practice areas include local government, charter schools, employee benefits, corporate and commercial law. The firm has offices in Ft. Lauderdale and Delray Beach.Florida Solicitor General Christopher Kise joined Foley & Lardner as chair of its national appellate practice, a member of the litigation department, and white collar practice. Matthew A. Slater joined the Boston office of Morrison Mahoney. Slater’s practice focuses on litigation, products development and liability, and regulatory compliance. Harvey S. Kauget joined the Tampa office of Phelps Dunbar as a partner in the firm’s regional commercial litigation group. Kauget practices in the area of intellectual property litigation, focusing primarily upon patent litigation. Andrea G. Amigo joined Alvarez, Sambol, Winthrop & Madson as an associate. Philip L. Partridge, PA relocated to 390 N. Orange Ave., Bank of America Center— 23rd Floor, Orlando 32801. The firm handles mediations, personal injury, and probate litigation. David Anthony Hook has joined Joan Nelson Hook in New Port Richey. The law firm is now known as The Hook Law Group and will continue the practice at its current location: 4918 Floramar Terrace, Gulf Harbors, New Port Richey. Richard E. Douglas formed Richard E. Douglas, P.A., located at 46 S.W. First St., Ste. 400 in Miami. The phone number is (305) 358-0231 and the fax number is (305) 358-0232. The firm practices commercial litigation and transactional real estate. Alberta L. Adams joined the law firm of Mills Paskert Divers as a shareholder. Adams’ practice is devoted to construction, fidelity, surety, and bankruptcy matters. Lawrence G. Marín joined Horr, Novak & Skipp in Miami as an associate. Marín’s practice will concentrate on all admiralty and maritime matters.last_img read more

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February bar exam to be administered remotely

first_img The Florida Board of Bar Examiners, with the approval of the Supreme Court, will administer the General Bar Examination scheduled for February 23-24, 2021, remotely.This decision is based on current COVID-19 infection rates, which are rising in almost every U.S. jurisdiction.  Based on that current trend, and with the future trend of COVID-19 infection rates in Florida being uncertain, any plans to have an in-person administration in February 2021 would have been at risk of cancellation depending on the pandemic conditions in early 2021, according to the FBBE.The board successfully administered the October 13-14 examination remotely using ExamSoft Worldwide software  to 3,137 applicants.  The board will use ExamSoft to administer the February 2021 exam.The February 2021 exam will be administered over two days and will include Part A, the Florida-prepared portion of the examination, and Part B, the Multistate Bar Examination (MBE).   Part A will include three essay questions and 100 multiple-choice questions.  The MBE will include 200 multiple-choice questions.  Part A will be given on Tuesday, February 23, and Part B will be given on Wednesday, February 24.Applicants sitting for the February exam must have access to the technology necessary to take an online examination, including a computer with a webcam and an internet connection to allow for proctoring. All applicants taking the test must install ExamSoft’s software on the computer that they are using to take the examination. The board will not provide this technology to any applicant.Applicants should check the board’s website regularly for additional announcements about the upcoming General Bar Examination. February bar exam to be administered remotely Nov 18, 2020 Top Storieslast_img read more

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Gophers win one in Michigan

first_imgGophers win one in MichiganMinnesota scored only four runs in a three-game series against the No. 3 Wolverines.Daily File Photo; Jaak JensenMinnesota pitcher Sara Moulton winds up to throw a pitch against Indiana on Saturday, May 4, 2013, at Jane Sage Cowles Stadium. Jared ChristensenApril 21, 2014Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintNo. 13 Minnesota traveled to Ann Arbor, Mich., over the weekend and pulled off an upset victory over third-ranked Michigan on Friday before fallingSaturday and Sunday.The Gophers won 1-0 in the first game of the three-game set but lost 3-1 and 7-2, respectively, in the final two games.Minnesota’s lone win came as a result of stellar pitching from senior Sara Moulton, who started the game, and freshman Sara Groenewegen, who struck out four batters in 2.2 innings of relief.The Gophers’ pitching staff could only do so much, though — the struggling offense totaled just four runs in the three-game series.Still, the Friday win over Michigan — which snapped the Big Ten leader’s 20-game winning streak — was huge for Minnesota’s confidence.Gophers head coach Jessica Allister said she was happy with the way her team played during the first two games but was disappointed it didn’t pull out another win.“It was a bit disappointing not to come away with the series win,” Allister said, “but I think we showed we can play softball at a very high level.”Moulton collected the win in the first game, her 20th of the season, and Groenewegen was awarded the save for her relief work.Groenewegen, who was named a finalist for the National Freshman of the Year award last week, suffered the first loss of her college career Saturday.Moulton said she felt good about the weekend as a whole, and now her focus is shifting toward making improvements for the rest of the year.“We’re feeling good about the weekend,” she said, “but there are still some things we have to fix up and improve on.”Those improvements will start at the plate as Michigan’s tough-to-hit pitching staff quieted Minnesota’s bats all weekend. The Gophers’ four runs this weekend pale in comparison to the 25 they produced in their previous three games.Allister credited Michigan’s pitchers but said her team didn’t do itself any favors.“We helped them out,” she said. “We left seven runners on base Saturday and just couldn’t come up with the big hit to blow it open.”Michigan, on the other hand, came away with the big hit when opportunity knocked.Sunday’s game started as a pitchers’ duel, but the Wolverines blew the game open with a six-run fifth inning.That big inning came just after Gophers freshman infielder Sam Macken blasted a solo home run to level the score at 1-1.Macken said she was excited to give her team the offensive boost but was disappointed it didn’t win the game.“It obviously didn’t finish the way we wanted it to,” she said.The Gophers’ two losses drop them to 11-5 in the Big Ten, but their 33 wins overall are tied for second-most in the conference.Now, with 10 games left in the regular season, Moulton said the focus is on finishing strong and building momentum toward the postseason.“Now we have seven games in a row at home, and we’re playing great softball,” she said. “That should all help to finish the year strong.”last_img read more

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Minnesota falls to Stanford 3-1 in first round of Final Four

first_imgMinnesota falls to Stanford 3-1 in first round of Final FourThe Gophers are now 0-8 all-time against the Cardinal.Tommy SlettenThe Gophers volleyball team huddles up in preparation for the national semifinal match on Dec. 15. Minnesota lost 3-1 to Stanford in its second consecutive Final Four. Tommy SlettenDecember 16, 2016Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintMinnesota saw its hopeful season come to an end on Thursday with a 3-1 loss to Stanford in the national semifinal.The Gophers lost 26-24 and 25-19 in the first two sets. They made a comeback and won the third 25-22, but the Cardinal emerged victorious in a 25-22 fourth.“Congratulations to Stanford, they played a really good match,” said Minnesota head coach Hugh McCutcheon. “I’m obviously disappointed to not continue in the tournament, but as much as it stinks in the short term, when you put in this body of work, you have lots to be proud of, especially from this group.”The height of Stanford proved to be too much for Minnesota again; the Gophers had already lost to the Cardinal earlier in the season.With 6’6 Kathryn Plummer, 6’8 Merete Lutz, and 6’3 Inky Ajanaku plugging up the middle, Minnesota saw a shrinking hitting percentage for a match total of just .149, and succumbed to Stanford’s 18 blocks.“Stanford is a great blocking team, they played great out there,” senior outside hitter Sarah Wilhite said. “I just think as hitters, [the height] makes it hard to combat the block.”The Gophers did not go down without a fight, though.With the season hanging in the balance, down two sets to none, ESPNW Player of the Year Wilhite led a charge to win the third set for Minnesota 25-22.Wilhite had 25 kills in her final match, and accumulated 13 digs.However, Stanford was too difficult to hit around down the stretch.With 18 blocks as a team, and 80 digs, their defense was almost impenetrable for the night, forcing Minnesota to commit mistake after mistake. Both Ajanaku and Plummer had 15 kills, leading Stanford’s steady attack through the night.Minnesota struggled to find rhythm all night, and were unable to hit above .260 in any set in the match.Minnesota’s senior class gave a huge amount to the program over the last four years, including two consecutive Final Four trips.“It’s been a privilege to play under a coaching staff and to play with the teammates that we have. It hurts finishing this way, but we did have a great season, and I’m proud of our team. Throughout the four years we were always fighting, we were always connecting and unified, and I think that’s something to be proud of,” Wilhite said.Despite the losses of six seniors out of this class, there is hope for the future with the performances seen tonight.Junior middle blocker Molly Lohman had a productive evening and hit .421 with eight kills and had a team-high eight blocks as well.Junior libero Dalianliz Rosado had a team-high 16 digs, while first team All-American sophomore setter Samantha Seliger-Swenson had 50 assists.Star freshman outside hitter Alexis Hart also shined at times, getting 11 kills and four blocks, but struggled to find accuracy and only hit .050.“Sadly we didn’t finish the way we wanted to, and the seniors are amazing and I appreciate everything they have done,” Hart said.While this year was not the storybook ending that Minnesota had hoped for, the future may still shine bright for the Gophers.last_img read more

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Elite cyclists are more resilient to mental fatigue, study finds

first_imgShare LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter In addition, the professional cyclists performed better than the recreational cyclists in the computerised cognitive task which measure ‘inhibitory control’ or willpower. This is not surprising as the ability to suffer is a major factor in the sport of cycling .Professor Marcora, says that the two effects go hand in hand, because becoming resistant to mental fatigue should bolster willpower during the latter stages of a competition such as the Tour de France.Although largely hereditary, he speculates that superior willpower and resistance to mental fatigue may be trained through hard physical training and the demanding lifestyle of elite endurance athletes. Professor Marcora is also developing, in collaboration with the Ministry of Defence, a new training method (Brain Endurance Training) to boost resistance to mental fatigue and endurance performance even further.center_img Email As British cyclist Chris Froome celebrates his third Tour de France victory, research from the University of Kent and Australian collaborators shows for the first time that elite endurance athletes have superior ability to resist mental fatigue.Professor Samuele Marcora, Director of Research in Kent’s School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, co-authored a report in the journal PLOS ONE entitled Superior Inhibitory Control and Resistance to Mental Fatigue in Professional Road Cyclists.For the study, Professor Marcora and colleagues compared the performance of 11 professional cyclists and nine recreational cyclists in various tests. As expected, the professional cyclists outperformed the recreational cyclists in a simulated time trial in the laboratory. The new finding was that while the recreational cyclists slowed down after performing a computerised cognitive task to induce mental fatigue, the professional cyclists’ time trial performance was not affected. Pinterestlast_img read more

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Irish struggles worry Quintain’s Wembley

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Linde to disclose results on furnace analysis

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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V. Alexander reacts well

first_imgThe reactor was first shipped from its manufacturing plant in Germany to the Port of Rotterdam via barge, before being lifted directly onto a geared vessel for shipment to the Chinese port of Xiamen, where the reactor was transhipped onto another barge and delivered to the port of Gulei.The phthalic anhydride reactor, which is used in the plastic manufacturing industry, was transported alongside six other oversize units, weighing up to 50 tonnes, as well as 17 wooden cases full of installation equipment.V. Alexander, which is a member of the X2 Projects network, will deliver two additional phthalic anhydride reactors for the same project in China’s Zhangpu County over the next few months.www.valexandertransport.dewww.x2projects.comlast_img read more

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