Dyke a ready plug for looming Manila hole

first_imgMOST READ No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist Thrust into the starting lineup in lieu of Dionisio, the former De La Salle player showed glimpses of his improvement, leading the Stars to an 87-70 triumph over Bacolod Master Sardines on Friday night at San Andres Sports Complex in Manila.The 6-foot-3 Dyke delivered his first double-double in the MPBL, finishing with 17 points and 10 rebounds as the Stars secured their 20th win in 24 games this season. Manila stayed within striking distance of the San Juan Knights, who lead the North division with a 20-3 record.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4But Dyke, who was released by La Salle in April, emerged as the feel-good story of the game as he sparkled for a team littered with veterans like Gabby Espinas, Ronnie Matias and Mac Tallo.“I was just focused entering the game,” Dyke said in Filipino. INQ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash PLAY LIST 01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash02:54Praise, festivities at Quiapo Church ahead of Black Nazarene’s return01:06Anti-US rally in Manila against attacks in Iraq01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:45Iran police shoot at those protesting plane shootdown01:54MMDA deploys rescue team to Batangas following Taal eruption LATEST STORIES Leonardo DiCaprio, Taika Waititi, other stars react to Oscar nominations Thailand reports case of coronavirus from China When Pops met Martin’s son Santino NFA assures ample rice supply in ashfall, eruption-affected areas Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Microsoft ends free Windows 7 security updates on Tuesday Pekaf brings world tourney back ‘home’ ‘People evacuated on their own’ Lava gushes out of Taal Volcano as villagers flee Mark Dyke. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netDeemed not good enough by his college team early this year, Mark Dyke is carving his niche as an athletic, sweet-shooting forward for Manila-Frontrow in the Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League (MPBL).And with the Stars set to lose prized forward Aris Dionisio to the pro league after the Chooks to Go MPBL Lakan Season, the stage is set for Dyke to take on a bigger role.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

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N. Korea agrees to nuclear timeline

first_imgHe said later in response to a question from The Associated Press that it was the first time that North Korea had ever offered a timeline for declaring and disabling its nuclear program. Kim said, “We agreed (on) a lot of things between the United States and the DPRK. We are happy with the way the peace talks went.” “We made it clear. We showed clear willingness to declare and dismantle all nuclear facilities,” he said. The agreement is “very significant, for sure,” said Patricia Lewis, director of the U.N. Institute for Disarmament Research in Geneva, noting that North Korea had allowed U.N. inspectors back into the country and that they could verify what is declared. “Confidence can increase, and we can see whether or not it’s really being shut down,” Lewis said. Hill declined to say whether the agreement would include more than the plutonium-producing nuclear reactor in Yongbyon, which North Korea shut down in July. “We have to work out some of the details on that,” Hill told reporters. “We will have a declaration in time to disable what needs to be disabled,” he said, adding that “for example the Yongbyon reactor would have to be included.” He said he and Kim had discussed a range of issues in their two days of talks at the U.S. and North Korean missions to U.N. offices in Geneva. Kim said one of those was North Korea’s demand to be removed from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. “In return for this we will receive political and economic compensation,” he said. “We wouldn’t be an enemy country anymore.” Hill said earlier Sunday that improving U.S. relations with North Korea will depend on other progress in the talks, saying it “is a relationship that we will continue to try to build step by step with the understanding that we’re not going to have a normalized relationship until we have a denuclearized North Korea.” He said he expected the next full session of the six-nation talks in mid-September would produce a “more detailed implementation plan for `disablement.”‘ The meeting in Geneva was part of a flurry of “working group” sessions called for in February’s six-nation accord in which North Korea agreed to disable its plutonium-producing nuclear reactor and declare and eventually dismantle all its nuclear activities. In exchange, the economically struggling North will receive oil and other aid. The U.S., as part of the agreement, promised to begin the process of removing the country from the terrorism list and work toward full diplomatic relations. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TALKS: A U.S. state department official says the country must account for, disable programs this year. By Eliane Engeler THE ASSOCIATED PRESS GENEVA – North Korea agreed Sunday to account for and disable its atomic programs by the end of the year, offering its first timeline for a process long sought by nuclear negotiators, the chief U.S. envoy said. Kim Gye Gwan, head of the North Korean delegation, said separately his country’s willingness to cooperate was clear – in return for “political and economic compensation” – but he mentioned no dates. Christopher Hill, a U.S. assistant secretary of state, said two days of talks between the United States and North Korea in Geneva had been “very good and very substantive” and would help improve chances of a successful meeting later this month with Japan, Russia, South Korea and China in six-nation talks aimed at ending the North’s nuclear weapons program and improving relations between North Korea and other countries. “One thing that we agreed on is that the DPRK will provide a full declaration of all of their nuclear programs and will disable their nuclear programs by the end of this year, 2007,” Hill told reporters, using the initials for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. Hill said the declaration will also include uranium enrichment programs, which the United States fears could be used to make nuclear weapons. “When we say all nuclear programs, we mean all,” he said. last_img

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Kee’s hotel is ringing in the changes

first_imgAfter an extensive renovation to the Terrace Ballroom, Kee’s will be opening its doors for all to see on Sunday 25th September when the hotel hosts its annual Wedding Fair. Damask glittering wallpaper creates luxurious soft tones, while new lighting and mood wall with multi colour options creates a unique backdrop for top table guests. More atmosphere is created by sparkling fairy lights. Specially designed Top Table Thrones for the Bride and Groom will ensure they remain the centre of attention.The Terrace Lobby , with its own wood burning fireplace, is the perfect place for guests to mingle and spill out onto the hotel’s terrace and gardens. Another special feature has been added to the hotel as well ­ a new bell tower has been built above the entrance into the Terrace Ballroom. The antique brass bell from the 1930s has been lovingly restored and brought back into use, ceremonially ringing in the newly weds when they arrive at the Terrace Ballroom to meet their guests. Kee’s Hotel has added a number of additional complimentary benefits to their already extensive range including complimentary candy table to say thank you, mood wall lighting and fairy light backdrop, top table thrones for Bride & Groom, ceremonial antique bell of welcome, second helpings for all guests and complimentary accommodation for parents of the Bride and Groom on the night of the wedding.The hotel received extensive coverage this year when it was chosen to be featured on TG4’s documentary about historic hotels of Ireland. “It is such a lovely honour to be now recognised as one of Ireland’s most historic hotels”, says Vicky Kee.Below are some pictures of the lovely refurbishment. Kee’s hotel is ringing in the changes was last modified: September 9th, 2016 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Kee’s Hotelrefurbishmentlast_img read more

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Datebook

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant The Distillery Collective artists coalition will feature various paintings and sculptures and photographic works through March 24, 8 p.m. at Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture, Soiland Humanities Center at California Lutheran University, 60 W. Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks. Free. Call (805) 493-3316. The teenage rock band Teen Equinox will perform, 8-11 p.m. at Salvation Army, 320 W. Windsor Road, Glendale. Tickets: $3. Call (818) 5548-3374. Peru’s Tania Libertad will perform Afro-Peruvian music, 8 p.m. at Royce Hall, UCLA. Tickets: $20-$38. UCLA students: $15. Call (310) 825-2101 or visit www.uclalive.org. Mail Datebook entries – including time, date, location and a phone number – to Daily News City Desk, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365; fax (818) 713-0058; e-mail dnmetro@dailynews.com. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! FRIDAY: An ongoing cinematic production of Deep Sea 3D, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. through Aug. 3 at IMAX Theatre, 700 State Drive, Los Angeles. Tickets: $7.50 for adults, $5.50 for seniors and students; $4.50 for children. Call (213) 744-7400 for showtimes. Trail to the Stars evening hike, 6 p.m., Temescal Gateway Park, 15601 Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. A telescope will be furnished. Bring flashlight. Meet in front parking lot. Call (310) 454-1396, Ext. 106. An ongoing play based on the Stephen Sondheim-James Lapine musical “Into The Woods,” 7 p.m., through March 26 at Eclectic Company Theatre, 5312 Laurel Canyon Blvd., North Hollywood. Tickets: $15. Call (818) 508-3003. JPL scientist Paul Weissman will be the featured guest speaker for the Los Angeles Pierce College Astronomy Society, 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Campus Center, 6201 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. last_img read more

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Kenny Miller: Neil McCann played huge part in decision to sign

first_img“I’ve known him a very long time, I know the kind of person he is.“When he was a player, he was a winner, as a manager, I know he’s a winner and wants to demand the best out of his group. That’s something I wanted to be part it.“The way he plays I think will suit me as well. All in all it’s a pretty good fit.”McCann was delighted to secure the signature of his former teammate and believes that his presence will have a big impact on and off the park. McCann said: “It’s clear why I brought him here.“He’s a top player. He’s a real goalscorer.“He brings an intelligence and experience to my squad that I felt was needed.“We have found it a problem scoring goals, I don’t expect him to take the whole burden but I think he will help other strikers at the club.“They will learn from him as you don’t get to his age and still be in the condition he is in without looking after yourself and doing things right. That will rub off right through dressing room.”Miller has penned a two-year-deal which will see him turn 40 at the expiry of his contract, but said it may not be his final spell as a player.“I would never say never but it definitely takes me to the grand old age. “I’m probably past that actually and hit the next stage but I feel like I’m definitely capable of performing at that level for next two years then we’ll see.” Kenny Miller said Neil McCann played a ‘huge part’ in his decision to sign for Dundee.Miller joined his former Rangers and Scotland team-mate’s playing squad on Wednesday following his departure as Livingston player/manager last week.The 38-year-old held talks with St Mirren before his move to Dens Park but said that McCann’s influence ensured he chose the Dark Blues.He said: “The manager had a huge part.last_img read more

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Federer and Djokovic lead tributes to Murray ahead of open

first_imgDjokovic posted a tribute on Instagram to a man he has known since they first faced each other as 13-year-olds in 2001, concluding: “Whatever happens, I will always cherish our amazing matches over the years and be grateful for those experiences.” Murray’s hip problem first flared up at the French Open in 2017, with the Scot going under the knife the following January. Late in 2017, Federer took part in Murray’s charity exhibition event in Glasgow, and remembers how much the three-time grand slam champion was struggling. “I know how not well he was,” said Federer. “I couldn’t believe he actually played. But it was for a good cause. “I guess everybody can understand where he comes from. At some point when you feel like you’re never going to get back to 100%, you’ve had the success that Andy has had, you can only understand the decision. “I was disappointed and sad, a little bit shocked, to know now that we’re going to lose him at some point. I hope that he can play a good Australian Open and he can keep playing beyond that, really finish the way he wants to at Wimbledon. “Of course, it hits us top guys hard because we know Andy very well. We like him. He’s a good guy, Hall of Famer, legend. He won everything he wanted to win. Anybody would substitute their career with his. “It’s a tough one, but one down the road he can look back on and be incredibly proud of everything he has achieved.” Murray has never previously dropped a set against gritty Spaniard Bautista Agut but admitted he is in such bad shape physically that he expects to lose. He told newspaper reporters: “I know I’ve got no chance of winning this tournament and most likely I’m going to lose in the first round. I’m not happy about that. Because of the way the last six months of competing have gone, I could win but it’s likely that I won’t. It’s going to be uncomfortable. “If it is my last match, I want to try and enjoy it – enjoy the whole experience, which is maybe something during my career that I’ve not done. I’ve always been focused on tactics and winning and finding a way.” As for what comes next, Murray is considering having surgery to resurface his hip. He insisted on Friday that would be for quality of life reasons rather than with a comeback even in the back of his mind, but he has been talking to other players who have had the same procedure. Murray has interests away from the court and a young family, but admitted: “Once I’d started thinking about stopping, all of the things that I thought I would quite like to do, I have zero interest in doing right now. “Thinking about what I do when I finish playing and rushing into decisions – from speaking to psychologists – is the worst thing I should be doing. “It’s going to take time for me to deal with it. I need time to get over it and then to know what my next steps are going to be. I know that will be difficult. I love tennis. I love playing the game.” “It was very obvious for everyone, you saw it, you didn’t need to be on court, to notice that he’s struggling, that he’s not moving as well as he normally does,” said Djokovic. “We’ve seen so many years of Andy Murray being one of the fittest guys on the tour, running around the court, getting always an extra ball back. I think to that extent, we are kind of similar. “Our trajectory to the professional tennis world was pretty much similar. His birthday is one week before mine. We’ve grown together playing junior events. We played lots of epic matches in the professional circuit. Support: Murray and Djokovic. SNS Group“Obviously to see him struggle so much and go through so much pain, it’s very sad and it hurts me as his long-time friend, colleague, rival.” Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic added their tributes to the outpouring of support for Andy Murray as the Scot gears up for what could be his final professional tennis match. Murray will face Roberto Bautista Agut in the first round of the Australian Open on Monday before deciding the best next course of action for his injured right hip. It was a practice match against Djokovic on Thursday that laid bare the seriousness of Murray’s continued struggles and led to him emotionally announcing his imminent retirement the following day. Djokovic did not even appear to be playing quite at full tilt despite losing only two games, but he insisted he was not taking it easy. last_img read more

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Breaking News in the Industry: March 30, 2018

first_imgPolice searching for shoplifting suspect after he jumps off bluffPolice are attempting to rescue a shoplifting suspect after he was seen jumping off a bluff in Old Hickory, Tennessee. Officials say officers confronted the suspect for shoplifting at the Home Depot on Old Hickory Boulevard. The suspect, who is known to police and has an active warrant, was able to flee in his vehicle but struck another car and nearly hit an officer in the process. A few minutes later, police spotted the suspect’s vehicle turning on Shute Lane but never got a visual of him. Police eventually found the car parked in a driveway on Cherry Branch Lane, but the suspect was nowhere to be found. Witnesses near that location say they saw the suspect jump off a bluff into Old Hickory Lake. Police have been searching for him since then and believe he may be in the water. EMS workers are currently searching for him by boat and officers are looking for him on foot, but officials say their helicopter had to be grounded because of the weather. Neither the suspect’s identity nor his physical description has been released at this time.  [Source: WSMV4 News]UPS employee accused of stealing cellphonesA Mohegan Lake, New York, man was arrested for allegedly stealing a couple of cellphones. Yorktown Police said Lylle Ryals, 22, of Mohegan Lake, was charged with fourth-degree grand larceny, a felony. Police said around 10:30 a.m. Feb. 21 an officer was sent to investigate a theft that occurred at the United Parcel Service, 1785 Front St. in Yorktown Heights. The investigation found that an employee stole a T-Mobile cellphone and an Apple iPhone valued at $1,325, police said. Ryals was contacted by police and voluntarily turned himself in at police headquarters March 27. He was arrested, processed and released on $100 bail.  [Source: Yorktown Patch]Shoplifting suspect arrested after high speed chaseAn East Dubuque, Illinois, man is accused of leading authorities from multiple departments on a high-speed chase through Dubuque. According to scanner traffic, 30-year-old Justin Roling was suspected of taking items from the Kohl’s store on the Northwest Arterial. From there, he led officers from both the Dubuque Police Department on Dubuque County Sheriff’s Office on a chase along Pennsylvania Avenue to Grandview Avenue and eventually to Dodge Street. Roling then rolled his vehicle as he approached Dodge’s intersection with Locust Street in downtown Dubuque. Speeds apparently reached close to 70 miles per hour during the chase. After being taken into custody, Roling was taken to Mercy Hospital, where he was treated and released. He’s now facing five charges, including 4th Degree Theft, Eluding, Operating While Intoxicated, and Driving with a Revoked License. [Source: ABC9 News]- Sponsor – Teen charged with robbing store, attacking LPA teenager from New Jersey was arrested on Sunday afternoon after police say she and accomplice tried to rob a store in the Roosevelt Field Mall. According to police, Gianna Sanchez, 19, of Adams Ter Clifton, New Jersey, entered the Sephora store in the mall, located in East Garden City, with an unidentified man. Police say the two were taking merchandise from the shelves and hiding it in a handbag Sanchez was carrying. According to police, a loss prevention associate in the store saw the two leave the store without paying, and then identified himself to them in an attempt to retrieve the merchandise. When he did, police say that Sanchez punched him in the face twice and then began to scratch him in the face and neck. Sanchez and her accomplice then ran to the parking lot and toward a four-door black Nissan. The man got in the driver’s seat, but the loss prevention officer managed to block Sanchez from getting in, and the man drove away. The loss prevention officer was able to make out a New York license plate on the car with the partial registration of HSK. Police arrived on the scene and arrested Sanchez, and say they determined that the two were responsible for robbing the same Sephora on March 10. Sanchez was charged with second-degree robbery, two counts of burglary, two counts of grand larceny and two counts of criminal possession of an anti-security item.  [Source: Garden City Patch]Man arrested and charged with robbing store and pointing gun at LPThe Delaware County Grand Jury in Ohio returned a six-count indictment against an 18-year-old man was, who officers, arrested for robbing a store inside of Polaris Fashion Place last week. The incident happened on March 24 around noon inside of Macy’s. “Loss prevention associates reported a male fled the store with merchandise suspected to be stolen,” said Delaware County Prosecutor Carol O’Brien. “They were able to provide the license plate number of the suspect vehicle and let police know the man pointed a gun at them in his attempt to flee.” Officers ran the plates on the car and they came back to a vehicle that had been reported stolen a couple days prior. According to the press release, Columbus police responded to an altercation outside of Wendy’s on West Broad Street, just two hours after the robbery. The vehicle involved in the altercation was the same vehicle involved in the shoplifting incident inside Polaris Fashion Place. “Mr. Woods was taken into custody,” O’Brien said. “Macy’s loss prevention associates later identified him from a photo lineup.” Woods has been charged with aggravated robbery with a gun specification, one count of tampering with evidence, receiving stolen property, and carrying a concealed weapon.  [Source: ABC6 OnYourSide]Dunkin’ Donuts debuts sneaker designNow you really can run on Dunkin’. Just, hopefully, it’s worth the trip. Dunkin’ Donuts, the coffee and baked-goods chain, provided the inspiration for a new limited-edition sneaker by Saucony, which designs high-performance running shoes. “As we celebrate Saucony’s 120th anniversary, we’re proud to honor our hometown marathon and Boston’s rich running heritage in partnership with Dunkin’ Donuts, a brand known for ‘keeping America running,’” Saucony CMO Amanda Reiss said. The shoebox resembled one of Dunkin Donuts’ iconic doughnut box. Inside, “the shoe features a Strawberry Frosted Donut surrounded by sprinkles on each heel, the Dunkin’ Donuts logo on the shoe’s tongue, splashy images of Hot and Iced Coffee on the sockliner and the brand’s signature tagline – America Runs on Dunkin’® – placed on the center heel along the reflective stripe,” the company notes.   [Source: APP.com] Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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Married Individual’s Single Return Not “Separate Return” (Camara, TC)

first_imgLogin to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative. An individual, who erroneously claimed single filing status while married, was entitled to file joint returns. The individual’s original single return was not a “separate return” to which the limitations of Code Sec. 6013(b)(2) applied.Government’s ArgumentThe government contended that the individual was prevented from switching to joint filing status for two reasons. First, he was barred from making the election to file jointly because it was more than three years after the deadline for filing the return at issue. Second, the election is barred after a deficiency notice for the tax year at issue has been mailed to either spouse.Separate ReturnHowever, a separate return means a return on which a married taxpayer has claimed the permissible status of married filing separately. It does not mean a return on which a married taxpayer has claimed an improper filing status. This is because filing a return with an improper filing status does not constitute an election under Code Sec. 6013(b)(1). There is no valid “choice” embodied in a return on which the taxpayer erroneously indicated a filing status that is not legally available.In addition, the legislative history shows that Code Sec. 6013(b)(1) was only intended to provide taxpayers flexibility in switching from a proper initial election to file a separate return to an election to file a joint return. It was not intended to foreclose correction of an erroneous return. Therefore, Code Sec. 6013(b) does not apply unless the taxpayer previously filed a “married filing separately” return.P.S. Morgan, CA-6, 86-2 ustc ¶9842, distinguished.F. Camara, 149 TC —, No. 13, Dec. 61,030last_img read more

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Lung Cancer Screening Promises Big Benefits, Big Costs

first_imgOne of the biggest clinical trials ever run by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) came to an end today with hopeful but budget-threatening news. NCI Director Harold Varmus announced at a press conference that the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) has been halted by a monitoring panel because it has strong evidence that lives can be saved by using high-tech x-ray imaging to screen for lung cancer. Preliminary data from the study, which enrolled 53,000 heavy smokers aged 55 to 74, show that deaths among those screened with low-dose computed tomography (CT) were 20% lower than among people who got a standard chest x-ray. The study, which began in 2002, did not investigate why the CT-screened people did better. Varmus said they presumably got early and effective treatment. This is good news because no other method of screening for lung cancer has ever reduced deaths from the disease. Lung cancer is by far the biggest cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and is predicted to kill about 157,000 people this year. Worldwide, lung cancer deaths are about 1.3 million a year. If the NLST study is right, it points to a way to achieve “the greatest single reduction of cancer mortality in the history of the war on cancer,” says James Mulshine, a cancer researcher associated with the pro-screening advocacy group, the Lung Cancer Alliance, and vice president for research at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois. But the trial results are worrisome, too, Varmus said. They’re likely to place significant new demands on health care. The main concern, said NCI deputy director of basic science Douglas Lowy, is the huge cost. It’s not just the price of each scan, which is estimated to be about $300. What concerns Lowy is the high rate of false positives likely to result from mass screening. About 25% of the scans in the NLST trial identified anomalies, but the vast majority of those were not dangerous cancers. Lowy and other experts worry that thousands of people will receive false alarms and thus undergo needless x-rays and biopsies. Investigating each false alarm will be expensive and potentially quite risky. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) U.S. health agencies won’t make any recommendations for individuals based on the NLST data right away, Varmus said: The first step will be to publish a final, peer-reviewed report on the study. Varmus expects it to be out within 2 or 3 months. Then review panels will decide who should consider getting a CT scan, when, and how often.last_img read more

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The Military Industrial Complex at Fifty: Is Science Society’s Slave or Master?

first_imgIn his State of the Union address Tuesday, President Barack Obama called for increased government involvement in funding innovation. Participants at a recent event marking the 50th anniversary of the so-called military-industrial complex questioned whether this kind of federal involvement traps science as the slave of government. Or could this dependency itself be perpetuated by scientists with overly political goals? This question was among many explored last week by panelists at a discussion sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which publishes ScienceInsider, on the golden anniversary of Dwight D. Eisenhower’s famed farewell speech. In 1961, in the grip of the Cold War, Eisenhower called to Americans to hold science in respect but to beware the “danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite.” In 2011, when scientists are constantly pleading for government grants while having to justify the importance of obscure, highly technical research to the taxpayer, is the opposite true? At the same time, panelists said, scientists are increasingly called upon to serve on government task forces, write and adhere to government regulations, and provide expert opinions for competing political interests in an ever-more technical society. From that perspective, said historian and author Gregg Zachary, Eisenhower’s words are “forever fresh and relevant,” carrying as much meaning for us today as they did for a missile-shy nation half a century ago. 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Throughout Eisenhower’s presidency, Greenberg said, he surrounded himself with scientists and created the President’s Science Advisory Committee. The president agreed that the government should fund both academic and military science, Greenberg said, but Eisenhower also had a history of staying out of science-policy clashes such as the Oppenheimer affair, when the former Manhattan Project director was stripped of his security clearance after voicing ethical concerns over nuclear weapons. One of Eisenhower’s fears, said Zachary, was that the military-industrial complex would undermine the public’s faith in science. The perception that the primary purpose of science was the manufacture of war machines, he said, was an “insidious penetration” that could come about unwittingly. Keeping a sharp distinction between science and governmental affairs would therefore be a defense of science’s reputation, Zachary said. (But perhaps this wasn’t clear to the academic scientists and engineers of the age, however. Following the speech, they began to cry unfair, insulted to the point that the presidential science adviser, George Kistiakowsky, felt compelled to write letters of clarification on the issue.) Zachary addressed the double-edged sword of government-science interface: the rise of a democracy-quashing cadre of eggheads, or the suppression of technical progress by what Zachary called “an unsophisticated majority” of citizens with different priorities. The tension between science and the public has flared up in recent times, easily seen in how the appellation “elite” was used as a pejorative during recent elections. So it was not surprising that much hoopla among scientists surrounded Obama’s inaugural promise to “restore science to its rightful place.” But panelists also examined whether that “rightful place” in government could overburden scientists. “Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields,” said Eisenhower in a less-cited section of his speech. “Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity.” Some of the panelists suggested that the days of the solitary inventor are far from gone, Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos being prime examples. All the same, said William Lanouette, science policy journalist and former senior analyst at the U.S Government Accountability Office (GAO), the increasing size and complexity of machines like particle accelerators and spacecraft require intense management and funding and their price increases the competition for them among scientists, no matter who pays for them. Science can get bogged down, he said, in such competition just as easily as in political fights. So was the current commander-in-chief wise to leave this “rightful place” deliberately vague? Lanouette said that Ike’s fear of scientists becoming overly involved in public policy—no matter how many Nobels or citations they may have received—is justified. When scientific projects become earmarked by Congress, abuse can breed, he suggested. He cited reports by GAO showing cases where peer review is bypassed and poorly managed scientific projects are prioritized if there is a political advantage to funding them. “If Congress wants a project, for jobs or another end, no amount of persuasive evidence matters,” he said. One emergent difference between today and the 1950s, said Daniel Sarewitz of the Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes at Arizona State University, Tempe, was the realization that a science establishment created by elites would essentially require elites to manage it as well. The further science affects society, he said, the more far-reaching that science-industrial complex becomes, encompassing agriculture, transportation, and even Earth itself. (Geoengineering and other climate science issues tend to bring this matter to the fore.) Each of these new opportunities, however, brings a new chance to fail: in disasters such as Deepwater Horizon, there are always elites to blame. Moreover, he added, today we have not an elite, but plural elites: experts to be mobilized for competing political interests. (Two modern examples might be fuel sources or when life begins.) “Partisan nastiness and scientific elite are not incompatible,” Sarewitz said. An audience member suggested that Americans could and should take a cue from China, which has experienced an exponential increase in the number and influence of “elites” since 1960; many top Chinese leaders are engineers. Another discussed the definition of the military-industrial complex, suggesting that such companies as Google could fall under this definition as its cameras could be used for surveillance. Where pure science ends and military applications begin—and which technologies should be shared with other governments—the panelists concluded, is a difficult question best addressed by remaining aware of balance in science and government. “In Washington,” Lanouette said, quoting Winston Churchill, “scientists should be kept on tap, not on top.”last_img read more

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