Seven Days wins five first-place awards in national media competitions

first_imgSeven Days,Vermont Business Magazine Seven Days, Vermont’s free, independent newsweekly, won four first-place awards from the Association of Alternative Newsmedia in a virtual ceremony on September 18. One of the winning entries, a joint project with Vermont Public Radio about Vermont’s state-licensed assisted living and residential care homes, received a national Edward R. Murrow award for investigative reporting from the Radio Television Digital News Association on October 10.The AAN Awards recognize the most artful, compelling and courageous journalism produced each year by the alternative newsmedia. AAN member publications from cities like Austin, Chicago, Boston and Burlington compete against each other. This year’s contest included entries submitted by 55 publications in the U.S., Canada and Norway.Seven Days’ AAN awards included:A first place in the Health Care category for “Hooked: Stories and Solutions from Vermont’s Opioid Crisis,” written by Kate O’Neill. The judges called it “passionate, intrepid reporting. The personal story of loss blends with the big opioid crisis picture in exactly the right ways.” The series has also received awards from the New England Newspaper and Press Association, and from Recovery Vermont. It was made possible in part by underwriting support from the Vermont Community Foundation, UVM Health Network and Pomerleau Real Estate. A first place in the Specialty Publication category for What’s Good: The Annual Field Guide to Burlington. A first place in the Multimedia Category for the Stuck in Vermont episode, “Lily Stilwell Competes in Gymkhana Ice Time Trials on Malletts Bay,” produced by Eva Sollberger and James Buck. When she was 19 years old, Stilwell was paralyzed from the chest down. Sollberger and Buck filmed her competing in the Sports Car Club of Vermont Ice Time Trials on Lake Champlain in February. Stilwell is the first person to compete in these single-car timed laps using hand controls — she accelerates and brakes using her hands instead of her feet.center_img A first place in the Innovation category for “Worse for Care,” a joint investigation by Seven Days and Vermont Public Radio that exposed safety violations in Vermont’s state-regulated eldercare facilities. The series was produced at VPR by Emily Corwin and Mark Davis, and at Seven Days by Derek Brouwer, Matthew Roy, Candace Page, Andrea Suozzo and James Buck. Seven Days data editor Suozzo created a user-friendly searchable database — populated by the project team — that offers access to inspection reports and details their findings.Find a full list of AAN award recipients here.(link is external)Less than a month later, the RTDNA recognized “Worse for Care” with a national Edward R. Murrow award for investigative reporting. VPR and Seven Days reporters spent months obtaining five and a half years’ worth of complaints and state inspections, detailed in thousands of pages of documents. The series revealed troubling patterns of inadequate care that led to dozens of injuries and indignities, and at least five deaths.In a joint press release from VPR and Seven Days, the organizations noted that the Murrow Awards are among the most prestigious awards for news, recognizing local and national stories that uphold the RTDNA Code of Ethics, demonstrate technical expertise and exemplify the importance and impact of journalism as a service to the community. Murrow Award-winning work demonstrates the excellence that Edward R. Murrow made a standard for the broadcast news profession. A full list of 2020 Murrow Awards can be found here.(link is external)About Seven DaysSeven Days, Vermont’s free, independent newsweekly, was founded by Pamela Polston and Paula Routly in 1995, and is now owned by Routly and 16 other employees. The Burlington-based company also produces the Stuck in Vermont video series. Seven Days has been named Business of the Year by both the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Burlington Business Association. In 2019, the Greater Burlington Industrial Corp. presented the local media company with the C. Harry Behney Economic Development Achievement Award.Source: October 20, 2020 – Burlington, Vt. — Seven Dayslast_img read more

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Nathan Performance Gear partners with Andy Potts

first_img Related Nathan Performance Gear – the hydration, performance gear and accessories specialist – has formed a multi-year partnership with Olympian, Ironman and world champion triathlete Andy Potts. Under the deal, Nathan will serve as Potts’ exclusive hydration and performance accessories partner.The partnership, which encompasses product, marketing, and promotional appearances, makes Potts the face of the Nathan brand, and will have Potts training and competing exclusively with Nathan products. Potts will also become an instrumental vehicle in providing insight and feedback on the development of new performance accessory products for the triathlete community.“Each year, I aspire to be better than I was in the previous year, and that’s going to come down to enhancing my performance on all levels, and partnering with the right companies to help me do so,” said Potts.“I know Nathan has this commitment to growth and innovation, and to really understanding and working with athletes and their performance challenges,” he added. “In doing so, they continue to provide superior products that address and solve these challenges and concerns.”This marks the beginning of a significant relationship between one of the triathlon world’s most successful competitors and a fast-growing and dynamic company in the outdoor and fitness industries.It is a move that will shape the competitive landscape of performance product development and innovation for years to come, says Nathan Executive Vice President of Sales and Strategy, Bridgit Lombard.“Our name says it all – we’re a company invested in developing performance gear – and while we continue to be the industry leader in hydration and reflective gear, we are on our way to becoming the all-encompassing performance accessory leader in the industry,” noted Lombard. “Partnering with someone of Andy’s calibre really epitomizes the direction we are moving in, and like Andy, the sky’s the limit in terms of what we can achieve.”According to Lombard, Nathan’s commitment to developing and maintaining relationships, such as the one forged with Potts signifies a larger, overall strategy of the company, which is to partner with those who share the same core values and goals of Nathan.“Andy embodies the essential characteristics of who we want to work with in all aspects of our business – from our retailers to our international distributors to our vendors to our sponsors,” explained Lombard.“We are dedicated to partnering with those who reflect our level of performance and aspiration, and who mirror our core values of relentless determination, humility, willingness to embrace change, ability to be nimble and creatively problem-solve, and who have a sense of the greater good and the impact we can all have on improving the lives of others.“This partnership, along with several other new and landmark ones we have finalised for this year, stakes our claim as a company whose leadership is committed to its employees, its partners, its phenomenal growth, and its success in ways we once thought never possible,” Lombard added.www.NathanSports.comlast_img read more

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Apple Pay, the iPhone, and near field communication are reinvigorating the mobile payments industry

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: John HeggestuenNFC is back.A radio frequency called near field communication is at the heart of Apple Pay, the new system for using an iPhone to pay securely at stores, which launched October 20 in the US. For years, NFC was thought to be a dead-end. But now, with Apple using it in the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, it’s suddenly the preferred mobile payments tech.  In a new report from BI Intelligence, we take a look at why NFC is back. Apple Pay was the catalyst that NFC mobile payments were waiting for. But other developments on the consumer, merchant, and developer-side are also reinvigorating NFC.Here are some of the key takeaways:Globally, shipments of NFC-enabled phones already grew to nearly 300 million in 2013. That means that there is already a large installed base of phones that can make NFC mobile payments. Once the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus rollout, the installed base will grow even more. continue reading »last_img read more

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June 15, 2017 Letters

first_img LettersBias on the Bench? On the 12th Judicial Circuit Court’s website, www.jud12.flcourts.org, we have published our final official response to the Sarasota Herald Tribune’s series of articles, collectively titled: “Bias on the Bench.” That series suggests racial biases are evident in the sentences imposed by criminal courts of this state, including those of the 12th Circuit. We hope the detailed response on our website answers questions the public may have about the implications and accusations of racial bias contained in the “Bias on the Bench” series. Over the years, the Sarasota Herald Tribune has often and admirably addressed issues of social injustice, serving as an advocate for those without a public voice. As noted in our response, we take no exception to the Sarasota Herald Tribune as a newspaper. We do take exception, however, to the conclusions drawn in the “Bias on the Bench” series. Our ability to disagree in a civil manner on issues affecting our nation and our communities is one of the hallmarks of our great society. With that said, the articles at issue have an edge to them suggesting anything but impartiality on the part of the authors. From the opening comparisons of our modern judiciary to the Ku Klux Klan, to the descriptions of various judges’ backgrounds, the style of journalism displayed in the series seems at odds with the otherwise laudable and objective journalistic traditions of the Sarasota Herald Tribune. We do not anticipate our response will go unchallenged. The reporters involved have fought hard over issues associated with their data and methodology, and appear to be firmly entrenched in their positions. The reason for the reporters’ push-back is quite simple: If our position on the role of plea bargaining is correct, then most of their inferences and conclusions fail. The reality is the vast majority of sentencing outcomes (approximately 98 percent in Sarasota County) are dictated by the parties and result from negotiations that take place outside the courtroom, without any judicial input. It is apparent that the authors of the series, and some of the experts and academics they rely upon, have not properly accounted for this reality, perhaps, in part, because they have no practical experience in this field. According to one of the reporters’ sources, University of Florida Law Professor Kenneth Nunn, only 10 percent of all pleas involve a “fixed sentence.” Because we know from practical experience, and all credible literature on the subject, that the opposite is essentially true, we contacted Prof. Nunn and asked him to substantiate that claim. Nunn acknowledged speaking with a reporter, but could “not recall giving a precise figure for what you call ‘fixed pleas.’” Though he perplexingly continued to suggest that “fixed pleas” account for a relatively small number of cases, he offered no basis or legal authority for that proposition. As explained in our response, a court’s ability to control what occurs during the plea process is limited. Plea agreements often contemplate multiple charges, which may be spread across one or more cases, and are influenced by numerous factors, including the relative strength or weakness of the evidence in each case. While judges decide whether to accept a plea tendered by the parties, procedural rules and other legal authority all but preclude judicial involvement in plea negotiations. Significantly, if a judge is unwilling to accept the terms of a negotiated sentencing agreement, the judge must afford the defendant an opportunity to withdraw from the plea. The “Bias on the Bench” series underreports, or fails to account for, many of these facts. Also lost in the “Bias on the Bench” series is the reality that every criminal case carries with it a unique set of facts and circumstances that do not necessarily lend themselves to side-by-side comparisons. In our response, we identify a number of instances in which the data relied upon in the series fails to capture or contemplate the existence of significant and legitimate facts that might influence a sentencing decision. Even if we accept the premise of race-based sentencing outcomes as true, the notion that a judge possesses the ability to compare and contrast every criminal case (or collection of criminal charges or cases attributed to a single defendant) for purposes of detecting racial bias within a specific plea agreement is simply unrealistic. The practical reality is that judges lack tools to assess the role of race in plea agreements negotiated by the parties. While we welcome and have suggested funding to implement such a system, no such system presently exists. We have gone on the record in support of meaningful legislation that would combat bias of any kind. However, we object to the introduction of legislation based on the methodology used in the Herald Tribune’s series. We acknowledge that judges maintain sentencing discretion after the rendition of a verdict in a criminal trial. Judges also decide sentences in relatively rare instances when defendants enter “open pleas.” In both settings, pre-trial prosecutorial decisions may limit a judge’s sentencing discretion. Reputable criminal justice experts, including those who have generated reports for the U.S. Department of Justice, recognize the tremendous influence law enforcement and prosecutorial decisions have over those subjected to the criminal justice system. Decisions relating to the severity and number of offenses charged, the involvement of statutorily mandated minimum sentences, and the pursuit of other enhancements fall within the exclusive domain of prosecutors. Finally, though I have not presided over a criminal division since 2004, the reporters involved in this series have, for whatever reason, chosen to focus some of their attention on sentencing records from cases tried before me, and concluded that a comparison of the various sentences I’ve imposed indicates racial bias. In response to this most personal attack on my professional integrity, I have compiled summaries, including case specific information, from all of the felony criminal trials I’ve conducted during my judicial career. We have placed these summaries on our website (and also included them as an exhibit to our formal response) for the public to view and compare. As an aside, though I find it unfortunate and offensive to designate the race of the individuals discussed in these summaries, the designations have nevertheless been provided for purposes of context. We ask that the public, and especially those familiar with the criminal justice system, review these summaries and decide if there is any evidence of bias as suggested by the authors of the series. I would ask that the reviewer note three cases in particular, State v. Dwight Yarn, State v. Reginald Crockett, and State v. Nashon Shannon. We appreciate the opportunity to share our response, and we hope the response answers any questions the public may have about the integrity of the 12th Circuit as it relates to racial bias in particular, and bias in any other form.Chief Judge Charles E. Williams 12th Judicial CircuitLactation Rooms I read with great interest the June 1 story on the addition of a lactation room at the Edgecomb Courthouse in Tampa. I applaud the courthouse’s efforts to provide a private place for lactating mothers — it’s a great benefit to all the families out there that have young children and wish to breastfeed — but I am saddened by how far behind our judicial system is lagging in providing what is an expected benefit in many places of employment. After returning to work from maternity leave, I was summoned for federal jury service in Orlando. At the time, I had been a member of the Bar for over 10 years and had never served on a jury, so I was excited to see the process from that side of the courtroom. When I went through the juror screening process, I was saddened to learn that there were no facilities to pump in the courthouse (not even a bench in the bathroom), no accommodation for me to bring the pump in to the courthouse, and no accommodations for taking short breaks to pump. The best the judge could do was permit me to leave the courthouse on the short lunch break, walk a few blocks to the parking garage, pump in my car and then go through security to get back to the courtroom. Since I needed to pump more than once a day, I had to get a letter from my doctor stating that I was medically unable to serve as a juror because I was lactating! I was embarrassed and disappointed that our profession made so little accommodation for something that is a natural part of life. I hope our profession can follow the lead of many employers by supporting lactating mothers with locations for pumping or nursing and greater awareness of the small accommodations needed for short breaks. Everyone will benefit by supporting those that choose to breastfeed and keeping mothers in the workforce during the brief time in their lives when they are lactating.Melissa Burt DeVriese Ormond Beach June 15, 2017 Letters June 15, 2017 Letterslast_img read more

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Why stories matter for children’s learning

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share LinkedIncenter_img Ever wondered why boys and girls choose particular toys, particular colors and particular stories? Why is it that girls want to dress in pink and to be princesses, or boys want to be Darth Vader, warriors and space adventurers?Stories told to children can make a difference.Scholars have found that stories have a strong influence on children’s understanding of cultural and gender roles. Stories do not just develop children’s literacy; they convey values, beliefs, attitudes and social norms which, in turn, shape children’s perceptions of reality. Email I found through my research that children learn how to behave, think, and act through the characters that they meet through stories.So, how do stories shape children’s perspectives?Why stories matterStories – whether told through picture books, dance, images, math equations, songs or oral retellings – are one of the most fundamental ways in which we communicate.Nearly 80 years ago, Louise Rosenblatt, a widely known scholar of literature, articulated that we understand ourselves through the lives of characters in stories. She argued that stories help readers understand how authors and their characters think and why they act in the way they do.Similarly, research conducted by Kathy Short, a scholar of children’s literature, also shows that children learn to develop through stories a critical perspective about how to engage in social action.Stories help children develop empathy and cultivate imaginative and divergent thinking – that is, thinking that generates a range of possible ideas and/or solutions around story events, rather than looking for single or literal responses.Impact of storiesSo, when and where do children develop perspectives about their world, and how do stories shape that?Studies have shown that children develop their perspectives on aspects of identity such as gender and race before the age of five.A key work by novelist John Berger suggests that very young children begin to recognize patterns and visually read their worlds before they learn to speak, write or read printed language. The stories that they read or see can have a strong influence on how they think and behave.For example, research conducted by scholar Vivian Vasquez shows that young children play out or draw narratives in which they become part of the story. In her research, Vasquez describes how four-year-old Hannah mixes reality with fiction in her drawings of Rudolph the reindeer. Hannah adds a person in the middle with a red X above him, alongside the reindeer.My own research has yielded similar insights. I have found that children internalize the cultural and gender roles of characters in the stories.Vasquez explains that Hannah had experienced bullying by the boys in the class and did not like seeing that Rudolph was called names and bullied by other reindeer when she read Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. Vasquez suggests that Hannah’s picture conveyed her desire not to have the boys tease Rudolph, and more importantly, her.In one such study that I conducted over a six-week period, third grade children read and discussed the role of male and female characters through a number of different stories.Children then reenacted gender roles (eg, girls as passive; evil stepsisters). Later, children rewrote these stories as “fractured fairy tales.” That is, children rewrote characters and their roles into those that mirrored present-day roles that men and women take on. The roles for girls, for example, were rewritten to show they worked and played outside the home.Subsequently, we asked the girls to draw what they thought boys were interested in and boys to draw what they thought girls were interested in.We were surprised that nearly all children drew symbols, stories and settings that represented traditional perceptions of gendered roles. That is, boys drew girls as princesses in castles with a male about to save them from dragons. These images were adorned with rainbows, flowers and hearts. Girls drew boys in outdoor spaces, and as adventurers and athletes.Even though he engaged in discussions on how gender should not determine particular roles in society (eg, women as caregivers; men as breadwinners), his image suggests that reading traditional stories, such as fairy tales, contributes to his understanding of gender roles.For example, look at the image here, drawn by an eight-year-old boy. It depicts two things: First, the boy recreates a traditional storyline from his reading of fairy tales (princess needs saving by a prince). Second, he “remixes” his reading of fairy tales with his own real interest in space travel.Our findings are further corroborated by the work of scholar Karen Wohlwend, who found a strong influence of Disney stories on young children. In her research, she found that very young girls, influenced by the stories, are more likely to become “damsels in distress” during play.However, it is not only the written word that has such influence on children. Before they begin to read written words, young children depend on pictures to read and understand stories. Another scholar, Hilary Janks, has shown that children interpret and internalize perspectives through images – which is another type of storytelling.Stories for changeScholars have also shown how stories can be used to change children’s perspectives about their views on people in different parts of the world. And not just that; stories can also influence how children choose to act in the world.For example, Hilary Janks works with children and teachers on how images in stories on refugees influence how refugees are perceived.Kathy Short studied children’s engagement with literature around human rights. In their work in a diverse K-5 school with 200 children, they found stories moved even such such young children to consider how they could bring change in their own local community and school.These children were influenced by stories of child activists such as Iqbal, a real-life story of Iqbal Masih, a child activist who campaigned for laws against child labor. (He was murdered at age 12 for his activism.) Children read these stories along with learning about human rights violations and lack of food for many around the world. In this school, children were motivated to create a community garden to support a local food bank.Building intercultural perspectivesToday’s classrooms represent a vast diversity. In Atlanta, where I teach and live, in one school cluster alone, children represent over 65 countries and speak over 75 languages.Indeed, the diversity of the world is woven into our everyday lives through various forms of media.When children read stories about other children from around the world, such as “Iqbal,” they learn new perspectives that both extend beyond beyond and also connect with their local contexts.At a time when children are being exposed to negative narratives about an entire religious group from US presidential candidates and others, the need for children to read, see, and hear global stories that counter and challenge such narratives is, I would argue, even greater.By Peggy Albers, Professor of language and literacy education, Georgia State UniversityThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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Investor splashes out on Rotunda resi

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Mark of success: Mark Bourgeois interview

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Demonstrating excellence in welding awards winner

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ExxonMobil renews carbon capture partnership

first_imgThe new five-year agreement builds on ExxonMobil’s participation in Princeton’s E-filliates Partnership, a corporate membership programme that aims to help accelerate research, development and deployment of energy and environmental technologies, which begun in 2015.“We collaborate with leading universities and institutions around the world to find meaningful and scalable solutions to develop lower-emission technologies,” said Vijay Swarup, Vice-President of Research and Development for ExxonMobil Research and Engineering.“Our work with Princeton University’s Andinger Centre builds on decades-long interactions with the university, supporting the essential research in science, engineering and humanities needed to address national and global issues.”ExxonMobil has been working with carbon capture, sequestering for more than many years. Princeton University is advancing this technology with new research to better understand how stored CO2 flows within rocks and interacts with minerals, improving the understanding of underground storage capacity.Princeton University scientists are also working with ExxonMobil on the development of carbonate fuel cells. This is in addition to the company’s ongoing collaboration with FuelCell Energy to enhance technology for capturing CO2 from industrial facilities and electric power generation.last_img read more

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Mojo Maritime on point for DeltaStream

first_imgMojo Maritime has led the installation of Tidal Energy Ltd’s DeltaStream device in Ramsey Sound, off Wales.Mojo Maritime developed the installation plan and managed the specialist services required to complete the works in the challenging tidal streams experienced in the region, Mojo’s press release reads.This included dynamic positioning (DP2) vessel operations, remotely operated vehicles, hydrographic survey, heavy lift, cable operations and marine project management.Richard Parkinson, Managing Director of Mojo Maritime, said: “The deployment of DeltaStream marks a significant achievement for all involved and Mojo is delighted to have been able to support the Tidal Energy team in reaching this important milestone.”Tidal Energy Ltd’s 400 kW DeltaStream demonstration device was loaded off the quayside in Pembroke Port on December 13, by the offshore construction vessel ‘Siem Daya 1’ before making the short passage to Ramsey Sound for installation during a suitable tidal window.Mojo Maritime, part of James Fisher and Sons, specialises in project management, engineering and consultancy services for the marine renewable energy industry.last_img read more

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